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Thread: Studies that support the Primal Diet? page

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    Matt Caton's Avatar
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    Exclamation Studies that support the Primal Diet?

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    I can't find any studies that support a Primal diet on this website. That is, evidence of actual human beings during the period of 10,000 to 1 million years ago eating that way that this website suggests. I hope you all can inundate me with the science because I love this diet and way of living, but I think our anatomy suggests we evolved eating primarily plants. I hope to be enlightened.

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    JKC
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    Check the research section of the forum - there are tons of related articles there
    Karin

    A joyful heart is good medicine

    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose. - Jim Elliot

    Mmmmm. Real food is good.

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    Do your own study.

    Go to your nearest natural land area - bush, woods, forest, open grassland, whatever.

    See how many abundant, naturally-occurring edible plants you can find and see how long you can live on them.

    There's your science.

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    I suspect we did evolve eating mostly plants - berries, fungus, roots, leafy vegetables, seeds, nuts, that kind of thing.

    However, that's not to say most of our calories didn't come from meat and fat. That's a difference concept. It takes a lot of twigs and berries and fungus to match the calorie content of a hunk of meat and fat. In short, I suspect (not "know") that ancient humans derived a lot of calories from meat, but ate a higher volume of plants.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussieluke View Post
    Do your own study.

    Go to your nearest natural land area - bush, woods, forest, open grassland, whatever.

    See how many abundant, naturally-occurring edible plants you can find and see how long you can live on them.

    There's your science.
    That depends on your knowledge. Depending on who and where you are and what you know, some people could find quite a lot.

    Also, how many wild animals do you find, just asking to be split-roasted?

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    Quote Originally Posted by captaineight View Post
    That depends on your knowledge. Depending on who and where you are and what you know, some people could find quite a lot.

    Also, how many wild animals do you find, just asking to be split-roasted?
    Not that many ...but you'd only need one to last you a while.

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    Way to be not helpful everyone.

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    peril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaineight View Post
    That depends on your knowledge. Depending on who and where you are and what you know, some people could find quite a lot.

    Also, how many wild animals do you find, just asking to be split-roasted?
    I live in Australia's largest city. The suburb is inundated with possums. The gambol on my roof most nights. A short walk takes me into a national park with wallabies and smaller marsupials. The creeks harbour rats and fish (I've caught bass in my local creek). The estuaries and ocean are teeming with fish, though pollution in the estuaries renders some of them toxic. Some of those estuaries still have the remains of Aboriginal fish traps.

    I'm sure the local Aborigines could show me how to gather edible plants, but the records also show that these pre-agricultural hunter-gathers ate all of the above (maybe excepting the rats which we introduced)
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    This does not refer to paleolithic man, and is only 5200 years old:

    The Ice Man's diet....

    Hair is preserved in many burials, but is often overlooked as an alternative material for isotopic analysis. Here we report that the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values for the hair of the 5200 year-old Ice Man indicates a primarily vegetarian diet, in agreement with his dental wear pattern.
    The Ice Man's diet as reflected by the stable nitr... [FASEB J. 1999] - PubMed result

    I realise it doesn't answer the question. I'm still looking for valid resarch (i.e. not blog entires, etc.) on the paleolithic diet. Coming up a bit empty at the moment.

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    It is a bit of a diversion from the true implications of the paleo/primal/evolutionary axiom to say that any study expounding upon the diet of paleo man can tell us what is optimal for humans. More plants, more animals, more carbs, more fats, none of this could possibly be discerned by looking at paleo man's diet since there is a stark contrast between momentary adaptation and optimal health. What we can do is look at what foods he didn't eat and infer that we might not be so adapted to those, and look at what types of foods he did eat, and infer that whatever he was getting in significant quantities (vegetation and meat) are things that we might be dependent upon for optimal health, at least in some quantity. But macronutrient ratios are impossible with this approach, only food types.

    By the way, humans have the anatomy of an animal that eats both plants and animals, hunts the animals with weapons and cooks its food, that can't be compared to any other animal. I infer that we inexorably are adapted to burning fats best because that herbivore (6 million years ago) got most of its calories from fat, fermenting fiber from plants into fats. But we have compromised fermenting power now (our appendix is dead and the gut is marginal) so exogenous fats ought to play a huge role.

    Better to use the evolutionary axiom for and then looking at the hard evidence for how far we ought to go in any one direction.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

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