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Thread: Going from slow-track to 100% - Help me think! page

  1. #1
    ariatrance's Avatar
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    Going from slow-track to 100% - Help me think!

    Primal Fuel
    My goal for 2011 was to be 99% primal by the end of the year. However, certain things have happened that would clearly be improved/corrected by being 100% primal. I just need some other minds to help me think through substitutions!

    Disclaimer - I am not a good cook and I do not enjoy cooking. I am accepting that it is a time-consuming task for me and will be done when it is done (this includes the crock-pot - prep is not my friend!).

    Problem 1 - dinner at the in-laws every Sunday night. It has become a war zone over my family's food choices. I think it would be better overall if we visited them without food as the focus. Every Monday is a disaster both emotionally and physically for me and the kiddos.

    How does my husband tell them we aren't eating with them anymore....nicely?

    Problem 2 - snacks and lunch on the run. Sometimes our day starts out okay and then the shit hits the fan. I have been running through Chick-fil-a for nuggets and fruit, which is okay (doesn't cause any physical/emotional issues) but it isn't great for the budget or health in the long run. Eating pounds of trail mix (easy take along) is costly too. We've gone through 3 lbs. of trail mix in three days after picnic-ing (sp?) on Saturday plus snacks Friday and today.

    What are good take along foods for these situations?

    Problem 3 - dinner experiments are 95% fails. Crustless quiche/frittata is a no-go for my son. Chicken is just too boring. Soups/stews are only liked by one member (me!).

    Can we eat meatloaf for every dinner? Is that a problem?

    Breakfast and lunch at home seem to be going well. It is just that end of the day dinner. Everyone is tired, cranky and ready to sleep - but we need to eat first. I sometimes wish we could all IF from 3 p.m. till breakfast but that's not going to happen for the 4 yr. old and 2 yr. old.

  2. #2
    melodious's Avatar
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    Problem #3, how does your family feel about eggy dishes? You say no to quiche/frittatas. What about aiming for sweet? Last night, I felt my sweet tooth calling me, so sauteed a small banana in coconut oil and cinnamon, then added two eggs. Sweet, protein-y, fatty, yummy.
    Not for an every day thing, but it could definitely be an add-in.
    Buy pre-chopped veggies for fajita fun. When the veggies are pre-chopped and you buy some taco/fajita seasoning, then you just have to cook the meat, throw in the seasonings and veggies. The whole thing (since all is pre-chopped) should only take 15-20 minutes.
    Broil plain chicken breasts and then serve with fun sauces. Tomato, some Indian ones (korma sauces are non-sugary, based in coconut milk), pesto - all could work alongside some cooked meat.

  3. #3
    Nomad1's Avatar
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    You have dinner with your in-laws every week???? I can't imagine having a regular day each week where we had dinner with the in-laws (and I like them).

  4. #4
    Dr. Bork Bork's Avatar
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    Baked coconut milk custard makes a great hot breakfast, IMO (and house smells good to boot!)

    do you have to stop eating at your parents? Couldn't they just prepare a nice pot roast & you can eat that? What are they making that's not agreeing with you?

    If you are too busy in the middle of the day to eat, then don't. Eat when you get home. Keep your pantry well stocked. You can make your own trail mix (cheaper, tastier, and stretches further). Your children will not die if they have to wait an extra hour to eat. If they're genuinely hungry when they get home, they'll eat whatever you give them.

    If you are pressed for time on dinner, figure out some easy, fast recipes. Some of my faves are bacon wrapped chicken, bacon wrapped scallops, bruschetta chicken (chicken breast w/tomatoes, mozzarella, and EVOO), chicken stir fry, and fish. I think I love to cook because I figured out how to make meals quickly, and they taste good. Also try mark's new quick meal PB book. Very handy!

    Make the husband cook. You might be surprised. Mine enjoys cooking, so I always give him cooking duties on the weekend.
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    DaisyEater's Avatar
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    Maybe if you gave some insight into the nature of your fights with them, we might better help you to address that.

    Have you picked up any of the primal cookbooks out there? It might help you if you had a small repertoire of dishes that you knew how to make.

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    theholla's Avatar
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    Problem 1 - Hmm...can't help on being nice - it's not my strong suit. Is it really that hard though to do a Primal-ish dinner though? I feel like I may be spoiled, but my in-laws mostly cook Southern style, so dinner is typically some meat, some greens, and biscuits that I can just skip. The worst stuff I eat over there is fried fish and the occasional pie filling. My parents are a bit trickier because Mom's a vegetarian and they keep kosher, but she makes me awesome salads and egg dishes, and doesn't mind if I cook fish for extra protein. Of course, this is all a moot point if your in-laws are just being jerks about it.

    Problem 2 - The incredible edible (hard-boiled) egg! Seriously - my favorite snack. I keep seasoning salt in my desk at work. I make them by the dozen and keep them in the fridge, and bring them with me when I don't have time for breakfast. I also like cut up apples with almond butter (not the best for weight loss, but fine for kids), cut up veggies with dip, canned sardines, and cold sausages. I pack lunch for work most days - either a big ass salad, leftovers from dinner, or chili con carne.

    Problem 3 - Yes, you can eat meatloaf for every dinner, but someone will probably start refusing to eat it very soon Though I do currently have my husband eating chili for 4 meals a week or so. So...what about chili? It's fast, it's cheap, and most people like it. Let me know if you need a recipe. In general, what types of food do you and your family like?
    The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

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  7. #7
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    As far as #1 goes, play the health and wellness card: "The kids and I don't tolerate wheat or sugar very well." You can expound a bit if they ask, but make it about healthy eating and what you as a family are willing to do or eat.

    Can you volunteer to cook primal meals at your in-laws' house?


    #2. It sounds like your problem is prep work vs. convenience here. Keep fruit and cheese and hard-boiled eggs available for snacks. Yogurt cups are convenient, though there can be a lot of sugar in some of them. Sliced veggies are great. Homemade trail mix is good.

    Make sure that you and your family are eating when you are actually hungry, not just eating because they are bored. Three pounds of trail mix in three days is a lot, even for a family of four, especially if there was chocolate or dried fruit in there.

    #3. Why do you call dinner an "experiment"? What is going wrong with it?

  8. #8
    ariatrance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
    do you have to stop eating at your parents? Couldn't they just prepare a nice pot roast & you can eat that? What are they making that's not agreeing with you?

    If you are too busy in the middle of the day to eat, then don't. Eat when you get home. Keep your pantry well stocked. You can make your own trail mix (cheaper, tastier, and stretches further). Your children will not die if they have to wait an extra hour to eat. If they're genuinely hungry when they get home, they'll eat whatever you give them.

    If you are pressed for time on dinner, figure out some easy, fast recipes. Some of my faves are bacon wrapped chicken, bacon wrapped scallops, bruschetta chicken (chicken breast w/tomatoes, mozzarella, and EVOO), chicken stir fry, and fish. I think I love to cook because I figured out how to make meals quickly, and they taste good. Also try mark's new quick meal PB book. Very handy!

    Make the husband cook. You might be surprised. Mine enjoys cooking, so I always give him cooking duties on the weekend.
    99% of the meals are pasta based, the other 1% are rice based or soup. The side dish is usually rolls or garlic bread. Sometimes there is a vegetable or lettuce and dressing too but this has only been in the last 3 years, since my son started eating solids. Even if I skip out on the obvious grain, I still end up with a headache, husband too. TMI - The kids and I end up having difficult poo the next few times after eating at their house.

    There is also the dessert issue. At 99% of the meals, a grain-based dessert is served (cake or cookies). If my children do not eat their dinner (at least 1/2), then they don't get dessert. I'm not going to fill them up on sugar right before bedtime. I apply this same rule everywhere. About every sixth dinner, something is served that the kids don't like. I let them know that they don't have to eat it but that dessert is not an option if they don't. My son is totally okay with that! I still have to re-direct the 2 year old. Grandma and Grandpa start in with WW3 at that point....over cake! The stress and bad feelings this issue is creating on both sides is not worth it in my opinion and I would rather forgo a food-based visit than continue. I'm all for visiting - just not around a meal anymore.

    Husband doesn't get home at a good time in the evenings to cook a meal before bedtime, at least not for the kids to partake, so I'd still have to cook their food.

    Yes, my children will die if they have to wait an extra hour for food when they are hungry....because I will lose it! Both are spirited and need a very structured life, i.e. bedtime always the same, mealtime always the same, routine daily activities. A change in the schedule is a big challenge for them, so when hunger or tiredness or discomfort is added onto that, a complete meltdown by one child, if not both, is pretty much guaranteed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad1 View Post
    You have dinner with your in-laws every week???? I can't imagine having a regular day each week where we had dinner with the in-laws (and I like them).
    It came with the husband. I knew this going in eight years ago. I just didn't know about the passive-aggressive disrespect of other people's food choices.

    Quote Originally Posted by theholla View Post
    Problem 1 - Hmm...can't help on being nice - it's not my strong suit. Is it really that hard though to do a Primal-ish dinner though? I feel like I may be spoiled, but my in-laws mostly cook Southern style, so dinner is typically some meat, some greens, and biscuits that I can just skip. The worst stuff I eat over there is fried fish and the occasional pie filling. My parents are a bit trickier because Mom's a vegetarian and they keep kosher, but she makes me awesome salads and egg dishes, and doesn't mind if I cook fish for extra protein. Of course, this is all a moot point if your in-laws are just being jerks about it.

    Problem 2 - The incredible edible (hard-boiled) egg! Seriously - my favorite snack. I keep seasoning salt in my desk at work. I make them by the dozen and keep them in the fridge, and bring them with me when I don't have time for breakfast. I also like cut up apples with almond butter (not the best for weight loss, but fine for kids), cut up veggies with dip, canned sardines, and cold sausages. I pack lunch for work most days - either a big ass salad, leftovers from dinner, or chili con carne.

    Problem 3 - Yes, you can eat meatloaf for every dinner, but someone will probably start refusing to eat it very soon Though I do currently have my husband eating chili for 4 meals a week or so. So...what about chili? It's fast, it's cheap, and most people like it. Let me know if you need a recipe. In general, what types of food do you and your family like?
    Chili has been a no-go for the kids, though the husband and I will eat it with great gusto! Cut up veggies - another poster mentioned this too. Question - if I spent one evening a week prepping all the veggies, would they keep in the fridge for ~1 week? How would I store them for freshness? I used to freeze cut up veggies but the clump that forms when you don't use plastic bags is a bit of a difficulty.

  9. #9
    theholla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ariatrance View Post
    Chili has been a no-go for the kids, though the husband and I will eat it with great gusto! Cut up veggies - another poster mentioned this too. Question - if I spent one evening a week prepping all the veggies, would they keep in the fridge for ~1 week? How would I store them for freshness? I used to freeze cut up veggies but the clump that forms when you don't use plastic bags is a bit of a difficulty.
    Aw, sorry to hear the kids won't eat chili! Storing cut up veggies depends on the veggie - some last way longer than others. Generally, I've found that carrots, celery, peppers, broccoli, and cucumber keep well. Carrots and celery benefit from some water. Pepper, cucumbers, and broccoli prefer to be drier - I like to store them in these. Though they aren't exactly snack appropriate, I've also had good luck prepping chopped collard greens, peeled and diced sweet potato, and chopped red and yellow onions in advance.
    The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

    You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

  10. #10
    Nomad1's Avatar
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    Problem 1-it can only be a war zone if you participate in the war, that's why people create boundaries. If a visit is causing that much turmoil, end the visits or scale them back to a couple times a month. If you set boundaries and they cross them, it's up to you and your husband to do something about that, not just let it keep going on and on. If you don't, then you've conditioned them that it's okay to cross them.
    I also think kids over 2 are never too young to help with dinner prep and to learn proper food nutrition. Why can dinners not be a family experience, prep to clean up? Most the hang up kids have with food are bread into them by the parents so it's important to start young. I'm not a believer in dessert so it wouldn't be an issue in our house and I definitely wouldn't teach my kids that if they ate their meal then they'd get dessert...setting it up as some big reward in their mind. I think dessert is for special occasions/a rare treat.
    There are a lot of Primal recipes out there, in the books and on this website. I like simple meals during the week like steak, ham and eggs, fish, chicken, just basic meals.

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