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  1. #11
    Balance's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    I had to give up bread cold turkey since I was totally addicted to it. My digestion was so much better after removing it completely.

    My friends who eased into paleo used Julian Bakery to get their bread fix in with less guilt. They have a gluten free bread that is sprouted and very low carb as well. It tastes like a sourdough/onion English muffin. I tried it once and made a paleo cheeseburger with it and it wasn't half bad. Here is the link.
    Purity Bread

    But personally I like the stuff in between sandwiches and burgers more so I just go with the good stuff and toss the bread.
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

  2. #12
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    Unless you have celiac disease, I think true sourdough is the best wheat product to eat. Before I gave up most grains, I was following WAPF and for awhile was only eating long fermented sourdough bread. After awhile I decided it would be okay to have some white flour crackers and tortillas since the phytic acid would be low, but I got intensely constipated for a few days after eating them. So I think there is something in the gluten being less of a problem in traditionally fermented bread. I'm not willing to test it at this point by trying some sourdough again since I'm feeling so good and my discomfort from the other gluten things I ate was so extreme, but I don't know, maybe someday in the future I will. Sourdough is the only wheat product I would still have once in awhile if I could. Nothing beats it for me.

  3. #13
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    This is the best sourdough bread I have ever had.

    Truckee Sourdough Company

    Established in 1996, Truckee Sourdough Company is an artisan bakery located in the small Sierra mountain town of Truckee, California near the California/Nevada border.

    The bakery supplies crusty sourdough and other breads to markets and restaurants in the Reno, Carson, Lake Tahoe, Sacramento and California Central Valley regions.

    Truckee Sourdough is a natural Artisan Bread. It is made using only freshly milled unbleached flour, sea salt and water.

    The sourdough breads are leavened using a sour culture derived from the naturally occurring wild yeasts present in the Truckee area. The Ciabatta bread is leavened using commercial yeast in the Italian tradition. No oils, fats, preservatives, dough conditioners or artificial souring acids are used.

    The long, slow process used to prepare Truckee Sourdoughs creates the rich flavors and textures of traditionally leavened bread.

    Unlike high volume modern-day bakeries where machines process the breads in their entirety to produce perfect duplicates of one another, Truckee Sourdough breads are hand finished giving each loaf it's own delightfully uneven shape, irregular internal crumb and color. The loaves are slowly baked to create rich, thick crusted country breads reminiscent of times long ago.

  4. #14
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    IMO, any amount of gluten is a problem.
    I agree!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna View Post
    Well, it looks like there is a difference in opinion about what bread is the healthiest option. I seriously doubt I have celiac, but I guess there is always that possibility.

    So, anyway, I guess I will use this loaf of fresh, local sourdough beings I just bought it yesterday. And then I will either try a normandy rye/sourdough or gluten-free bread (Purity). The truckee bread looks good too but I doubt I can buy it in Oregon stores. Homemade artisan bread probably tastes the best, but I’m not much of a baker.

    For years now, I have had the mindset that a little in moderation is usually fine. For example, I have a real sweet tooth so I don’t keep sweets around the house but I will buy a sweet treat a couple of times per week. I know the moderation view is probably not primal’s viewpoint and people who have an allergy or intolerance to certain foods need to totally abstain.

    I’m not sure if primal is for me. I have been eating organic and relatively healthy for years. I know I feel better when I eat more meat and fresh veggies and fewer grains, but I don’t know how extreme I need to be with this. I plan to taper off the bread slowly. I hope to eventually go without gluten for one month to see if I notice a difference. I’m sure the week I went without bread or gluten was not long enough to determine. I didn’t notice much of a difference that week.

    Thanks for all the suggestions. There is a recipe posted on Elana’s Pantry for gluten-free bread made with almond flour that looks good and easy to make (gluten-free bread 2.0). It also uses arrowroot powder. I don’t know if arrowroot powder fits in with the primal plan. It has carbs, but at least it is gluten-free and non-grain.
    Elana's bread would definitely be a good transition bread. Arrowroot powder is fine, as is almond flour.
    The more I see the less I know for sure.
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  6. #16
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    Donna you don't have to have celiac to have a gluten sensitivity.

  7. #17
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    I just had that conversation with my doctor yesterday. She has many patients who do not have Celiac but when she puts them on a gluten free diet they do well and feel much better.

  8. #18
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    If someone is sensitive to gluten, do you know how long they need to go without gluten to notice a real difference in how they feel?

  9. #19
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    Someone mentioned rye as gluten-free. I'm almost 100% certain that rye contains gluten, although it's not as "strong" a gluten as wheat, and the amylases in it can necessitate adding wheat or sourdough starter *if* you want a leavened bread. But even w/o the wheat, there is gluten in it, i believe.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MamaGrok View Post
    Someone mentioned rye as gluten-free. I'm almost 100% certain that rye contains gluten, although it's not as "strong" a gluten as wheat, and the amylases in it can necessitate adding wheat or sourdough starter *if* you want a leavened bread. But even w/o the wheat, there is gluten in it, i believe.
    This is correct. From Wiki: "Rye flour has a lower gluten content than wheat flour, and contains a higher proportion of soluble fiber."

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