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    Andreas083's Avatar
    Andreas083 is offline Junior Member
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    How do I eat more carbs?

    I've been on a VLC/LCHF diet for two years now. As I've started to work out more and have a physically demanding job I wonder what I could eat to increase my carb intake?

    I'm eating mostly vegetables as my carb source. Broccoli, bell peppers, avocado, tomatoes, zucchini etc. Even if I eat a lot of these I rarely get more than 50 grams of carbs.

    I have just started to eat some more fruit but I'm a bit afraid of eating to much fructose. Is it better to eat starch rich vegetables such as yams, potatoes or swedes?

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    Dragonfly's Avatar
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    Is it better to eat starch rich vegetables such as yams, potatoes or swedes?
    Yes. And if dairy works for you, add some!

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    Sweet potatoes (yams perhaps in your part of the world) are a lot better than white potatoes and my go to carb. I'm also a big fan of leangains and I recognize you from Martin's site. Keep up the great work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    Yes. And if dairy works for you, add some!
    +1

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    I love sweet potato, and yam fries. So tasty, and my energy goes through the roof when I have them. =)

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    Thank you! I will try adding some carbs. I eat heavy cream, butter and crème fraîche but i don't eat cheese or drink milk as I'm suspecting it gives me some troubles.

    I too have been reading about IF at Leangains and found it most interesting. I wonder though, as I work as a carpenter if I risk running out of energy?

    Some days can be really physically demanding, on these days I usually skip training after work because of the lack of energy. When I was running on carbs and lifting weights I did not feel this lack of energy though. I did eat around 5000 kcal a day whiteout gaining much fat.

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    I'm not an expert, but my understanding of the fructose in fruit is that its effects are moderated by the fiber. (The sweetest plant is sugar cane, which is basically a sugary stick.) Adding a bit of fruit probably won't hurt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    I'm not an expert, but my understanding of the fructose in fruit is that its effects are moderated by the fiber. (The sweetest plant is sugar cane, which is basically a sugary stick.) Adding a bit of fruit probably won't hurt.
    No. Fructose is fructose. Fruit isn't bad per se, but fiber matters squat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andreas083 View Post
    I have just started to eat some more fruit but I'm a bit afraid of eating to much fructose. Is it better to eat starch rich vegetables such as yams, potatoes or swedes?
    I think that's debatable. Here's my logic on the situation. This is the truth as I see it, so take it with a grain of salt.

    My understanding with fructose and why it seems to intensify fat accumulation is it's almost solely the responsibility of your liver to process it whereas all your muscles get to process glucose. However, fructose is very low GI while glucose is extremely high GI. My reasoning is in small quantities, fructose is better than glucose. Eating a single apple vs eating a single white potato, I think you're better off eating the apple because you're getting the same amount of carbs, but they're much lower GI and it will give a much lower insulin response. Your liver can handle processing a single apple. The problem is when you have an apple, a soda or a glass of orange juice and a sandwich. You're in carb overload. Your entire body has to process all those carbs. Your muscles are churning out the glucose, your liver is overwhelmed with fructose overload and you wind up producing huge amounts of triglycerides and overwhelming your entire body.

    It's my opinion that in small quantities, fructose is desirable as the insulin response is minimal. However, if you're eating the average American meal with 100+ carbs per sitting, fructose is a death sentence. Your liver just can't process the volume of fructose when compared to the amount of glucose all your muscles can handle, which is why I believe fructose gets such a bad wrap.

    Fiber helps slow the processing of glucose, but since most fruit is mainly fructose, does fiber have as much effect? I doubt it, personally. Note that fructose doesn't do jack for your energy. It doesn't go into your muscles, so it's a terrible fuel for workouts. I always cringe when I see people putting berries in their post-workout protein shake. Why? You're doing nothing but forcing your liver to make unnecessary triglycerides and upping your carb count for no reason.
    Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-29-2011 at 02:08 PM.
    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
    I think that's debatable. Here's my logic on the situation. This is the truth as I see it, so take it with a grain of salt.

    My understanding with fructose and why it seems to intensify fat accumulation is it's almost solely the responsibility of your liver to process it whereas all your muscles get to process glucose. However, fructose is very low GI while glucose is extremely high GI. My reasoning is in small quantities, fructose is better than glucose. Eating a single apple vs eating a single white potato, I think you're better off eating the apple because you're getting the same amount of carbs, but they're much lower GI and it will give a much lower insulin response. Your liver can handle processing a single apple. The problem is when you have an apple, a soda or a glass of orange juice and a sandwich. You're in carb overload. Your entire body has to process all those carbs. Your muscles are churning out the glucose, your liver is overwhelmed with fructose overload and you wind up producing huge amounts of triglycerides and overwhelming your entire body.

    It's my opinion that in small quantities, fructose is desirable as the insulin response is minimal. However, if you're eating the average American meal with 100+ carbs per sitting, fructose is a death sentence. Your liver just can't process the volume of fructose when compared to the amount of glucose all your muscles can handle, which is why I believe fructose gets such a bad wrap.

    Fiber helps slow the processing of glucose, but since most fruit is mainly fructose, does fiber have as much effect? I doubt it, personally. Note that fructose doesn't do jack for your energy. It doesn't go into your muscles, so it's a terrible fuel for workouts. I always cringe when I see people putting berries in their post-workout protein shake. Why? You're doing nothing but forcing your liver to make unnecessary triglycerides and upping your carb count for no reason.
    agreed
    Nutrition & Metabolism | Full text | Fructose, insulin resistance, and metabolic dyslipidemia Nutrition & Metabolism
    Concluding remarks

    The alarming increase in fructose consumption may be an important contributor to the epidemic of obesity and insulin resistant diabetes in both pediatric and adult populations. For thousands of years, the human diet contained a relatively small amount of naturally occurring fructose from fruits and other complex foods. Adaptation of humans to a high glucose/low fructose diet has meant that hepatic carbohydrate metabolism is designed to actively metabolize glucose with a limited capacity for metabolizing a small daily intake of fructose. The increasing application of high fructose sweeteners over the past few decades has resulted in a considerable rise in the dietary intake of fructose. A high flux of fructose to the liver, the main organ capable of metabolizing this simple carbohydrate, disturbs normal hepatic carbohydrate metabolism leading to two major consequences (Figure 2): perturbations in glucose metabolism and glucose uptake pathways, and a significantly enhanced rate of de novo lipogenesis and TG synthesis, driven by the high flux of glycerol and acyl portions of TG molecules coming from fructose catabolism. These metabolic disturbances appear to underlie the induction of insulin resistance commonly observed with high fructose feeding in both humans and animal models. Fructose induced insulin resistant states are commonly characterized by a profound metabolic dyslipidemia, which appears to result from hepatic and intestinal overproduction of atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Taking into consideration that a typical western diet not only contains high levels of fructose but is also rich in both fat and cholesterol, synergistic interactions among these nutrients can readily occur leading to a greater degree of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. In conclusion, emerging evidence from recent epidemiological and biochemical studies clearly suggests that the high dietary intake of fructose has rapidly become an important causative factor in the development of the metabolic syndrome. There is an urgent need for increased public awareness of the risks associated with high fructose consumption and greater efforts should be made to curb the supplementation of packaged foods with high fructose additives.

    Hepatic fructose metabolism: A highly lipogenic pathway. Fructose is readily absorbed from the diet and rapidly metabolized principally in the liver. Fructose can provide carbon atoms for both the glycerol and the acyl portions of triglyceride. Fructose is thus a highly efficient inducer of de novo lipogenesis. High concentrations of fructose can serve as a relatively unregulated source of acetyl CoA. In contrast to glucose, dietary fructose does NOT stimulate insulin or leptin (which are both important regulators of energy intake and body adiposity). Stimulated triglyceride synthesis is likely to lead to hepatic accumulation of triglyceride, which has been shown to reduce hepatic insulin sensitivity, as well as increased formation of VLDL particles due to higher substrate availability, increased apoB stability, and higher MTP, the critical factor in VLDL assembly.

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