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    robbie1512's Avatar
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    Is it true you can be more carb sensitive than normal? How do you know?

    Ok this is a newb question, but I have always retained more bodyfat than many of my friends, even though I lead a fairly active lifestyle. I do not drink milk and when I do eat dairy it is just the odd bit of light cheese or yoghurt. I am a newly converted PB'er and have been cuttin carbs and processed foods from my diet. However, I know many people who eat lots and lots of pasta, bread, rice and do much less physical activity than myself, yet they have much more defined muscles... Is it possible that they aren't as affected by carbs and is it possible I am much more affected? If it is true that some people are more affected than others AND I am one of those unfortunate, does that mean I am going to have to be extremely strict with my diet to drop my bodyfat from 14.5% to 11%????
    Any insight would be great!

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    No way to know yet. I would say if you want to do PB with dairy then try it out. Whether your strict or not your bound to lose bf. If you want to get even lower cut out dairy and do some high intensity training. The only the you have to be strict with is grains, legumes, sugar, processed crap and just keepin your carbs down.

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    Stabby's Avatar
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    Yes of course some people are less insulin-resistant than others. It depends upon many factors and some people can luck out and stay healthier for longer because they have managed to acquire some necessary components of a diet and avoid other ones.

    Like here, magnesium is super important for tolerating carbohydrate and most people are fairly deficient, but what if someone stumbles upon eating habits that yield more magnesium? Then they'll have lucked out. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/con...-0994.abstract

    You could go to the store, get some magnesium citrate (one very good form. Don't get oxide), take it before bed and the next day wake up more insulin-sensitive. The next day after that you will be even better and if you keep taking a fair bit of magnesium you will soon be nutritionally sufficient and your fasting glucose will be lower. Easy as pie.

    And Mark's blog and book have tons of easy info like that. People generally reap what they sow around here. You do your reading and make a big effort and you get a big reward.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stabby View Post
    Yes of course some people are less insulin-resistant than others. It depends upon many factors and some people can luck out and stay healthier for longer because they have managed to acquire some necessary components of a diet and avoid other ones.

    Like here, magnesium is super important for tolerating carbohydrate and most people are fairly deficient, but what if someone stumbles upon eating habits that yield more magnesium? Then they'll have lucked out. Magnesium Intake in Relation to Systemic Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and the Incidence of Diabetes

    You could go to the store, get some magnesium citrate (one very good form. Don't get oxide), take it before bed and the next day wake up more insulin-sensitive. The next day after that you will be even better and if you keep taking a fair bit of magnesium you will soon be nutritionally sufficient and your fasting glucose will be lower. Easy as pie.

    And Mark's blog and book have tons of easy info like that. People generally reap what they sow around here. You do your reading and make a big effort and you get a big reward.
    What about magnesium phosphate? This is what I take in powder form combined with vitamin c and zinc.

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    I truly don't know. I can't find any studies that test it. Do you feel a subjective calming sensation when you take it? If not then probably not. If you try citrate after taking phosphate and you notice a distinct effect of citrate, then you can be sure that phosphate doesn't absorb well.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

  6. #6
    randallfloyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robbie1512 View Post
    Ok this is a newb question, but I have always retained more bodyfat than many of my friends, even though I lead a fairly active lifestyle. I do not drink milk and when I do eat dairy it is just the odd bit of light cheese or yoghurt. I am a newly converted PB'er and have been cuttin carbs and processed foods from my diet. However, I know many people who eat lots and lots of pasta, bread, rice and do much less physical activity than myself, yet they have much more defined muscles... Is it possible that they aren't as affected by carbs and is it possible I am much more affected? If it is true that some people are more affected than others AND I am one of those unfortunate, does that mean I am going to have to be extremely strict with my diet to drop my bodyfat from 14.5% to 11%????
    Any insight would be great!
    I'd say don't judge it on weight alone. I was big on the carbs until I found PB. I'd get through massive amounts of bread, pasta, rice and oats. Even on this high carb diet when I wasn't exercising I didn't gain. My weight's always been 120-125lbs with low body fat %. No Matter how many carbs I had. This doesn't mean to say I could handle them. Quite the opposite - I felt rubbish most of the time. Low energy. Constant hunger. Digestive trouble, etc, etc. I eventually started paying attention to the signs. Something was wrong. That's how I found this place.

  7. #7
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    I did a headstand tutorial a while ago that you might find helpful. It's one of my older tutorials from when I first started blogging so it's not as good as some of my more recent ones, but it's still probably worth checking out.

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    Digby's Avatar
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    The short answer is YES. If you are, you adapt, just like you would if you had any other issue to deal with, like wearing glasses. I say this as a person who spent years trying to eat "normally" only to accept that normal for X is not normal for Me. Figuring all this out can take a while. Do yourself a huge favor and read Primal Blueprint, and if you have a scientific bent, read the bible on this subject by Gary Taubes, Good Calories, Bad Calories.
    This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it. Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Any given day you are surrounded by 10,000 idiots.
    Lao Tsu, founder of Taoism

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    DFH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stabby View Post
    Yes of course some people are less insulin-resistant than others. It depends upon many factors and some people can luck out and stay healthier for longer because they have managed to acquire some necessary components of a diet and avoid other ones.

    Like here, magnesium is super important for tolerating carbohydrate and most people are fairly deficient, but what if someone stumbles upon eating habits that yield more magnesium? Then they'll have lucked out. Magnesium Intake in Relation to Systemic Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and the Incidence of Diabetes

    You could go to the store, get some magnesium citrate (one very good form. Don't get oxide), take it before bed and the next day wake up more insulin-sensitive. The next day after that you will be even better and if you keep taking a fair bit of magnesium you will soon be nutritionally sufficient and your fasting glucose will be lower. Easy as pie.

    And Mark's blog and book have tons of easy info like that. People generally reap what they sow around here. You do your reading and make a big effort and you get a big reward.
    Well put.

    There is insulin resistance on one side of the spectrum, and insulin sensitivity on the other. Everyone is somewhere in between. I'm very insulin resistant, so I get the most benefit from Primal/low carb.

    There is a lot of debate over Taubes books, like the new one WWGF, and he's writing more for the insulin resistant side, which is not a small number of people.

    If you already know you are insulin resistant, stick with Primal, you will be glad.

  10. #10
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    Stabby~
    Thanks for the info on magnesium! I've started taking it recently for sleep (about 6 weeks now) and I've noticed that I have been able to eat more carbs and still drop the body fat--hurrah!

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