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    kurite's Avatar
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    Pork skin!

    I have already emailed three farms and called my butcher and nobody sells raw pork skin. They all say they never skin pigs anymore. WTF do I do? I really want to make some pork rinds but can't find a source of skin.

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    peril's Avatar
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    Buy pork belly. Skin it. Cook rest.

    I leave the skin on when cooking pork belly as its the best tasting part. I love the gelatinous texture when it's been slow cooked
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    I am slowly perfecting the art of making a pork shoulder roast with crackling. The best part is that I get to eat the experiments. You should be able to find roasts with the skin on them.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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    kurite's Avatar
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    Thank you. Isn't pork belly what bacon is made from? Anyway to make it taste like bacon? Also how much skin is actually on it?

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    My mom grabs the pork shoulder, pulls off the fatty outside with the skin, cut it up into small squares, then slow cooks it in a cast iron pan and finally lightly salts. BEST THING EVER. So crunchy, so salty, so perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kurite View Post
    Thank you. Isn't pork belly what bacon is made from? Anyway to make it taste like bacon? Also how much skin is actually on it?
    Pork belly is indeed used for what people in America call bacon. In the rest of the world bacon is a much more complex subject. In the uk we call your bacon streaky bacon. The stuff you call Canadian bacon we call Back bacon - this is the part of the pig that is called loin of pork or basically the pork chops without the bone in and cured in salt. We also have bacon called middle bacon which is essentially the back bacon(canadian) and the streaky bacon(regular usa bacon) stuck together. We also have the option of having it smoked or unsmoked. The unsmoked is just salted and the smoked is salted and then hung in a smoke house and gets that yellow tinge to it. You can also find shoulder bacon which is bacon made from shoulder pork but it is quite rare now. Check out some stuff on youtube if youre interested in which parts of meat come from where.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jandge View Post
    My mom grabs the pork shoulder, pulls off the fatty outside with the skin, cut it up into small squares, then slow cooks it in a cast iron pan and finally lightly salts. BEST THING EVER. So crunchy, so salty, so perfect.
    Mm
    mmmm

    When you say 'slow cooks in a cast iron pan' does that mean in an oven with a lid, or on the stovetop? How long for, what temperature?

    I am driven mad by the 'pork scratchings' sold in butchers that always, always have an ingredients list a mile long with added wheat rusk and flavourings. What's wrong with 'Ingredients: pork rind, salt'? Argh.

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    Recipe from Food Network Pork Loin and Crackling with Hassel Back Potatoes Recipe : The Cookworks : Food Network

    Pork Loin and Crackling with Hassel Back Potatoes

    Ingredients
    4 pounds pork loin, center cut with a thick rind/fat cap, skin intact
    1/2 cup kosher salt
    1/4 cup olive oil
    4 cloves garlic, smashed
    8 sprigs fresh thyme
    2 sprigs fresh rosemary
    Hassel Back Potatoes, recipe follows
    Apple Chutney, recipe follows
    Special equipment: butcher's twine, a roasting pan and rack
    Directions
    Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F.

    Score the rind, using long, parallel slits 1/8 to 1/4-inch apart across the width of the loin; be careful to cut only halfway to the flesh (see Cook's Note**). Rub the rind with the salt, ensuring that the salt is rubbed well into the slits. Rub the rind with 1/2 of the olive oil.

    Flip the loin over and rub the flesh side with the remaining olive oil. Place the garlic, thyme, and rosemary up against the flesh. Using butcher's twine, tie the herbs to the loin.

    Place the loin on a rack in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and arrange the potatoes at the bottom of the roasting rack. Reduce the heat to 425 degrees F. Return the roast to the oven to cook for 1 additional hour or until an instant-read thermometer poked into the center of the loin reaches 150 degrees F. Remove from the oven and let the loin rest for 30 minutes; the internal temperature will continue to rise about 10 degrees F, and the loin will finish cooking while it's resting (see Cook's Note***).

    Slice the "crackling" (crunch skin) off in 1 piece and cut into 1/4-inch strips. Slice the pork loin into 1/4-inch slices. Serve the pork loin warm with Cracklings, Hassel Back Potatoes, and Apple Chutney.

    Cook's Notes: *Do not use extra virgin olive oil for long cooking because it has a lower smoking point and can impart a bitter flavor if overheated; pure or light olive oil is recommended because they have higher smoking points.

    **We used a thoroughly sanitized box cutter to score the pork rind, but you can also use a very sharp paring knife.

    ***Resting meat after the cooking process gives the meat time to redistribute its natural juices and makes it moister.

    Hassel Back Potatoes:

    24 small Yukon gold potatoes

    1/4 cup olive oil

    1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus salt to season

    1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus pepper to season

    Place a potato in the palm of a wooden spoon. Use a sharp knife to make cuts 3/4 of the way down the width of each potato about 1/8-inch apart. Toss the potatoes with olive oil, 1 tablespoon salt, and pepper in a large mixing bowl.

    Place the potatoes in the bottom of a roasting pan, evenly spaced apart. Cook underneath the roast during the last hour of cooking, until fork tender. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with additional salt and pepper, to taste.

    Apple Chutney:

    1/4 cup unsalted butter

    3 cups thinly sliced Vidalia onions, see Cook Note*

    1 tablespoon kosher salt

    2 cups apple cider

    2 cups cider vinegar

    1 cup sugar, plus 1/3 cup

    4 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces, see Cook's Note**

    1 star anise

    Special Equipment: Potato Masher

    In a large saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion and 1 tablespoon of salt and cover. Saute until onions are translucent. Add the apple cider and increase to high heat. Reduce the cider until nearly evaporated. Add the vinegar and 1 cup sugar; stir until the sugar dissolves. Add the apples and star anise. Cover and reduce the heat to medium. Cook for 10 minutes.

    Remove the cover and continue to cook until thickened, about 10 minutes; stirring frequently. Add the 1/3 cup of remaining sugar. Remove star anise and mash until smooth. Transfer to a plate to cool.

    Serve warm or at room temperature with pork, chicken, or curried dishes.

    Cook's Notes: *Any sweet yellow or white onion, such as a Maui or Walla Walla, can be used in place of Vidalia onions.

    **A lemon half can be used to lightly rub the apples to keep them from oxidizing if you are unable to make the sauce right away.

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    Owly's Avatar
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    The farmer I buy my pork from is English, and he sells the most lovely fatty unsmoked back bacon (from his Berkshire pigs). The stuff we get here in the supermarket has all the fat trimmed off and is almost more like ham.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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  10. #10
    kurite's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by danandvicky View Post
    Pork belly is indeed used for what people in America call bacon. In the rest of the world bacon is a much more complex subject. In the uk we call your bacon streaky bacon. The stuff you call Canadian bacon we call Back bacon - this is the part of the pig that is called loin of pork or basically the pork chops without the bone in and cured in salt. We also have bacon called middle bacon which is essentially the back bacon(canadian) and the streaky bacon(regular usa bacon) stuck together. We also have the option of having it smoked or unsmoked. The unsmoked is just salted and the smoked is salted and then hung in a smoke house and gets that yellow tinge to it. You can also find shoulder bacon which is bacon made from shoulder pork but it is quite rare now. Check out some stuff on youtube if youre interested in which parts of meat come from where.
    I may as well ask you instead of starting a thread because you seem like you know your baco but is all bacon in America smoked even if its uncured and all natural/organic?

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