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Thread: Home made yogurt: Amount of whey?

  1. #1
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    I've made yogurt a couple of times lately and I'm getting about 60% whey, the balance being the good stuff. I know this because I strain the yogurt and I wind up with about 28 oz of thick, luscious yogurt but from a half gallon of milk.


    That last batch was started with a commercial Greek yogurt "With five active cultures," and I kept the temperature between 109 and 113 degrees per digital lab thermometer.


    Sure makes for expensive yogurt.


  2. #2
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    Save the whey for lacto-fermentaion. Kim chi! Sauerkraut! Soak nuts to remove phytates!

    Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

  3. #3
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    I thought I read that the whey is where most of the lectins are. Or something not desirable.


    While not up to making kraut or eating a lot of nuts, I DID soak my last batch of ribs in the yogurt and whey for a few hours. Can't say they were any different than any other batch.


  4. #4
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    The whey is where the lactose is, but you need such a small amount when lactofermenting (for the bacteria really) that its inconsequential. But really, I soak my almonds and such in the yogurt maker (112F) overnight with some water and whey and I have soaked nuts the next morning! I just dry them and store.


    Also, I think lectins are reduced when you get grassfed, raw milk.


    Try making tzatziki or raita with the yogurt.

    Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

  5. #5
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    Nay, I just wanna eat it. I can't even say those big foreign words.....


    Still, doesn't anyone make yogurt, and can they tell me what is a normal whey/solids ratio?


  6. #6
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    OTB, I make yoghurt at home sometimes. When I use whole milk, the yoghurt is thicker and firm. In the past, when I've used 1% milk, I'd get a runny yoghurt. Don't know the whey solids ratio. Do you strain it because you like it thick and strained, or to get rid of the whey? I don't know about whey having lectins but it's said to be high quality protein. I save whey that has naturally separated from soured raw milk, in the refriegerator and use it for lacto-fermentation as Tara has suggested and add it when I'm soaking grains (for the mister).


  7. #7
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    OTB, that sounds about right. When I used to make yogurt, I would wind up with a fraction of nice thick stuff from what I started with. If you strain it, then you'll not be left with much, but it tastes oh so good.


  8. #8
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    Thanks, CC. At least it sounds like this is normal. I guess it also shows why the commercial products often use pectin and/or powdered milk.


    Last night I took some of this luscious stuff, poured on thick coconut milk, and added blackberries.


    Yum.


    maba, I just like a thick yogurt. More satisfying mentally, I guess. Since the whey is so watery, I doubt if there is much protein in it. Not that I need it. And that's probably the source of the lectins in milk.


  9. #9
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    OTB I liked my yogurt really thick as well. I'd start off with a 2 quart covered pot to incubate in, mostly full, and end up with about 3/4 of a large yogurt container (I can't remember the sizes right now, you know what I mean though!). I'd say I lost probably 50-60% of the volume, but it tastes so much more satisfying when it's thick and creamy.


    It's also a perfect substitute for sour cream, and makes good creamy salad dressings as well when it's really thick.

    You are what you eat,
    and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan


  10. #10
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    Thanks, Hanna, that's right about what I'm getting as far as finished product. Even with cheap milk, that means the yogurt is costing as much as store bought.


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