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Thread: Why aren't you supposed to lift weights every day? page 3

  1. #21
    Thor Falk's Avatar
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    by definition, if you can do 60-70 then this is not max strength. the "adaptive" loads in terms of strength training are generally about 25reps or lower, you can call it 12x2, or 5x5, or 3x8, or any kind of combination that gets you there.

    whether you are wasting your time? push-ups are great - but you should add a bit more stuff at one point. Overuse injury might become an issue

  2. #22
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    Not sure if you're talking to be or someone else, but I don't do 60-70 all at once. I break it up over the day. I do about 10 at once. I'm going to start alternating push ups/squats on various days and increasing my reps to 20 and see how it goes.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anivair View Post
    How does this apply to bodyweight movements? This month i'm doing push ups every day at my office. I'd say that I do 60-70 per day broken up into sets of 10 over the course of 8 hours. is that okay? Am I wasting my time? Most of them are incline, but by the end of the month, i'm hoping to be doing most of them as standard push ups (which i'm bad at). Should I be taking days off with a load that light?
    The basic metric is if your performance diminishes over any period of time, then you maybe over training. Again it comes down to goals. Doing 70 for maintainance is different than someone doing 70 because two weeks ago they could only do 35.

    Load is entirely relative.
    If your food is fast, maybe you should fast.

  4. #24
    Thor Falk's Avatar
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    Yep. Does not really matter whether you do some all at once or over the day. If you do strength training you do your 5x5 or whatever your system is then you are finished for two days - literally. If you are able to do 50 more reps throughout the day then the weight is too low, and this means you won't build muscles or strength. If you train for stremgth or body composition, don't increase the reps, increase the weight. If you do bodyweight only, rather than cranking out 70 normal ones do 5x5 inclined, or any other style that brings you close to failure. http://thorfalk.wordpress.com/series/push-up-series/

  5. #25
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    Your obviously a beginner lifter so you may be able to get away with lifting every day and even progressing linearly, but once you lift for a while you will hit the wall and will realize how important rest days are. Push ups and air squats are good but they are not anywhere near equivalent to heavy screaming in agony benching, squating, deadlifting, and power cleans.
    "Live Free or Die"

  6. #26
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    I'm reminded of a friend who does push-ups every day... and has for years. He can do A LOT of pushups, but his muscle mass has never changed. Much like the farmers and workers you mentioned, they lift the same amounts in the same fashion on a daily basis. It's safe to conclude that daily "lifting" or bodyweight exercise will increase muscle endurance, but not necessarily strength. If my friend would start doing incline pushups or put on a weighted vest, he'd probably be surprised by how few pushups he can do!
    Our ancestors certainly didn't lift the same crap over and over every day of the week. Some days it was moving an animal carcass, and other days they were pulling themselves up into trees.

  7. #27
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    This is the very first point in Practical Programming - the body adapts to the specific demands placed on it, not greater demands or different demands. This doesn't mean that pushups are useless for anything but pushups, what it means is doing 10 pushups every day will eventually make it rather easy to do 10 pushups plus a little bit more, but if you never move on to do the "little bit more", you won't continue to increase your strength. Otherwise we'd all have huge powerful legs just from walking around every day, and super dark tans just from getting a little bit of daily sun.

  8. #28
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    The old timers (like Arthur Saxon) used to train almost everyday. They didn't train much each day though. The higher the volume of the workout than the longer the rest needed between workouts.

  9. #29
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    I ran a sheet fed printing press for 18 years. I probably loaded 2 tons of paper a day. I have a pretty good grip, but it did not build me up or make much physical change in me except get used to it. as was already stated -- apples and oranges...

  10. #30
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    Is this thread about "muscle size", "muscle endurance" or "CNS adaptation"? Because they're all key elements to strength, but they're trained (and overtrained) in very different ways.

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