Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: Confused about planks page 2

  1. #11
    runnergal's Avatar
    runnergal is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    921
    Primal Fuel
    Forearm is good. You can also place a rolled towel or a small plank under the heel of your hand to take some of the bend out of your wrist in the hand variations.
    MTA: because it is rare I dont have more to say

    "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - my daughter Age 7

  2. #12
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    Quote Originally Posted by zoebird View Post
    also, your wrists will strengthen. i would first get comfortable on forearms, and then do 10-15 seconds on hands (to strengthen wrists) and then the rest on forearms, until you can do it on your wrists for as long as you'd like. you'll be surprised at how strong people's wrists can get.
    Indeed. When I first started working at handstands my wrists would get very sore but now they handle it a lot better. I always do planks on forearms but admittedly don't do them too often I do other stuff for core.

  3. #13
    slowcooker's Avatar
    slowcooker is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    510
    If you have an exercise ball, 'stirring the pot' or just balancing on the ball work great too.
    YouTube - Stirring the pot - core exercise

  4. #14
    TigerLily's Avatar
    TigerLily is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    metro Portland
    Posts
    3,250
    OOhhh! I LOVE that, slowcooker! I've never seen that one, but it would be perfect for me. Love my ball, great tool. Thnx for posting.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  5. #15
    jrherring's Avatar
    jrherring is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    1,335
    go get 'em, Griff!~
    Even if you fall flat on your face, at least you're moving forward!

    Yr 42

    Yr 41

    February Whole 30-ish

    start. stop. start.stop...now ramping up to cruising speed!

  6. #16
    Patrick's Avatar
    Patrick is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    2,196
    If you can't do forearms on the ground (too hard to maintain), place your forearms up on the side of your tub, if you have one. That's a good two feet of elevation. It'll take some of the weight off when you're just starting out with the plank and give you the same benefits of not stressing your wrists.
    "Oh, you wanted answers...yeah, sorry, I'm not so good with those. Uh, probably something to do with science or something..." -- canio6

    August 2010: 207 lb, 37" waist, 25+% BF | Currently: 177 lb, 33" waist, ~15% BF

    Sometimes blogging as The Primal Mind. (My unorthodox and filthy-mouthed journal is semi-retired at this point)

  7. #17
    lolov's Avatar
    lolov is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    334
    Actually, doing planks on forearms is more challenging to the core.

    To make planks accessible, start by doing them on something like a chair (i.e. hands holding onto the side edges of a chair, or a stair, a bench... you get the idea) where the shoulders are lower than they would be when standing, but higher than the floor. When that becomes too easy, move down to a lower stair/chair/bench or do straight arm planks. If your wrists bother you, use dumbells (preferably hex so you're leaning on a flat surface, but round ones are fine so long as you pay attention) so that your wrists are neutral (i.e. you're holding the db in your hands, the db are on the floor and your body is in plank position); alternatively, you could make your hands into fists (instead of open hands) and lean on your knuckles instead.

    Then progress to forearm planks. if you can do forearm planks from the get go, more power to you! Also, in that video, that woman's butt is WAY up in the air. Your body should be STRAIGHT from shoulders to heels... this is what makes it so hard

    Hope that helps, Griff

  8. #18
    Griff's Avatar
    Griff is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    1,827
    lolov: I've *tried* doing the planks the way you say. My wrists will simply not take it. They buckle, even with the use-dumbbells idea.
    Primal eating in a nutshell: If you are hungry, eat Primal food until you are satisfied (not stuffed). Then stop. Wait until you're hungry again. Repeat.

    Looking for my Cholesterol Primer? Here it is: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...mer-(Attempt-2)


    Ditch the scale!: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33283.html

    My Success Story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread30615.html

  9. #19
    TigerLily's Avatar
    TigerLily is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    metro Portland
    Posts
    3,250
    Quote Originally Posted by lolov View Post
    Also, in that video, that woman's butt is WAY up in the air. Your body should be STRAIGHT from shoulders to heels... this is what makes it so hard
    Unfortunately, that screen capture is right at the part where she shows how NOT to do the planks -- so her butt is in the air. (And note at the top of the screen where the text at the top says not to do it like that.) Her form is good otherwise.

    I also question that the forearm version is more difficult. (?) My physical therapist started me out this way, on forearms, fresh out of the hospital. I'm pretty sure if the hands option were easier, that's what he would have had me doing, given my state at the time.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  10. #20
    Mirrorball's Avatar
    Mirrorball is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    434
    The forearm version is more difficult for the core muscles, which is the point of the exercise. The hand version is more difficult for the arms and wrists. For me at least the hand version doesn't do anything for my core muscles, it just makes my arms hurt.
    Height: 5'4" (1.62 m)
    Starting weight (09/2009): 200 lb (90.6 kg)
    No longer overweight (08/2010): 145 lb (65.6 kg)
    Current weight (01/2012): 127 lb (57.5 kg)

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •