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Thread: Prone to Severe Cramping after Hard Rock Climbing / MotoX Session page 2

  1. #11
    Andtckrtoo's Avatar
    Andtckrtoo is offline Senior Member
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    I get horrid thigh cramps with intense exercise and dehydration. I do need to make sure I have enough magnesium, calcium and potassium in my diet, but on a primal diet, I have little issue getting thes right amount of these. 40 oz of water is enough for me if I'm sedentary. If I add exercise, I need more. I try to drink 16 ounces before I even start to work out. I usually wake up, have 16 oz of water, then drink another glass before any intense workout. I do a lot of distance hiking now that I have two foster Aussies, but I also do a lot of strenuous road biking (lots of mountains here in California), and mountain biking. Not to mention kettlebells, weight lifting, etc.
    Christine
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gymx View Post
    That's not enough water if it's hot and you're doing strenuous exercise (28oz/hour x 5 > 96 oz). A "couple" endurolytes (if you're referring to the Hammer Nutrition product) is not enough either for that duration. I was taking 2-3 per hour while doing some ultra runs in the heat. Sounds like you're doing the right things but not the the proper magnitude to match your activity level.


    As far as I was aware, ~28oz / hr is the most your body can uptake during prolonged exercise. I've also tried taking endurolytes to the recommended dose, and even above, in the past. To no avail. I toned it down because after even a few of them, my sweat is noticeably saltier, to the point of having a stingy feel. I'm also supplementing around 200mg Mg and K in the morning.

    It's also not totally continuous either. A climb will take maybe 5-15 minutes in the sun, then I seek shade for at least as long.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by randallfloyd View Post
    Hey Lars. It sounds like you're muscles are tight and tense. Full of knots most likely. Climbing and biking are likely to create, and perpetuate these. I had this for months and was at a loss as to why. Cramps, pain, weakness, clicking joints, etc. I had the lot. It got to the point where I couldn't even walk without pain, and I had to switch rooms with my housemate (now I'm on the ground floor) because I could barely climb the stairs. Anyway, someone on bikeforums.net (I'm a cyclist) told me to get the Trigger Point Therapy Workbook. Long story short, I did, and it helped, a lot...

    Thanks for the reply Randall; I'll check it out. Even as a skeptical engineer, I keep an open mind when it comes to the human body. A book called "Healing Back Pain" by Dr. Sarno fixed all the severe back problems I had (no exercise or stretching)

  4. #14
    Lars86's Avatar
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    Hmm, I posted a reply to Randall, thanking him, but it was apparently moderated because I mentioned a book that helped me with my back pain.

  5. #15
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    DFH
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    Throw the milk in the trash!

  6. #16
    Lars86's Avatar
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    Because you personally don't agree with dairy, or some factually based causality with cramping?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lars86 View Post
    Because you personally don't agree with dairy, or some factually based causality with cramping?
    Diary, especially milk and cheese is very rich in calcium. To high in calcium can deplete your magnesium. To high in magnesium can also deplete your calcium levels. It a fine balance.

    I too have had quite bad problems with cramps during high intense/heavy sweating exercise as sparring in judo. Swimming also gave me cramps after 40-60 min. Sometimes so bad I had problems getting out of the water (avoid stupid mistakes huh?) One day I accidentally added to much salt in my meal. The day after when I went swimming I had no cramp at all. Drinking electrolyte when it is going on doesn't help me at all but the day before seemed to help.

    I was then on a vlc diet and I was thinking, as carbs binds a lot of water, maybe adding more carbs will make the body bind more water and thus not being dehydrated as easily.

    I have not been training so hard now so I don't know if I will have these problems again. I have also increased my carb intake and I am aiming for 100-150 g now.

    In the summer I'm planning to swim outdoors in a lake, but having severe cramps there is not so good...

  8. #18
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    Interesting ideas. I've been trying to up my carb levels in days prior and day of activities like this. So far, no cramps, but the weather is heating up so we'll see soon. I've been baking sweet potato and other yams and eating bananas to get this accomplished; any other ideas?

  9. #19
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    Have you tried ZMA?
    Carbs like you mention are healthy foods and you should eat them anyway.
    Only the sedentary have real cause to strictly limit carbs, that's obviously not you.

  10. #20
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    I read some of Mark's blog posts and they seem to conflict. When I'm climbing in bursts of 5 - 15 min on 5-15 min off. for 3-6 hours. Should I just dump a bunch of honey in my water instead of bringing Lara bars?


    Because intensive athletic training typically exhausts the bodyís glycogen stores, it needs a supplementary (albeit inferior fuel), which likely requires carbohydrate calories. (Yes, take a moment, if you need to.) The image of a runner loading up on carbs before a race isnít for nothing. Unfortunately, getting these from veggies just wonít do the job this time. Ideally, you should look to natural starchy carbs first (yams, squash, etc.) and then to whole grains like wild rice or quinoa. The whole grains are, admittedly, a lesser second choice, but theyíre better than just downing simple sugars. Try to keep the extra carb calories limited to pre-training and pre-competition times as much as possible.
    Races or any intensive training session lasting over 90 minutes often call for added carb refueling on the fly, too. Over the years coaching athletes, Iíve found that drinking 10-20 grams of sugars every 15 minutes after the first 60-90 minutes helps keep glucose in the bloodstream and thereby spares muscle glycogen. Any more than that and you run the risk of stomach upset. Once again, sports drinks are probably the most efficient source for carb energy, electrolytes and hydration. Though a piece of fruit might work for borderline training days, eating solid foods during a race generally backfires. Additionally, sport drinks have some advantages over straight juices. Thereís a reason these drinks have been around for a while. Iíd do some comparison shopping and personal trials to find one you prefer.
    Right after a long training session or race, youíre in a critical period for glycogen refueling. That first hour offers the most efficient opportunity for glycogen storage, and itís fine to refuel initially with simpler (faster uptake) sugars. Take it slow and go for drinks first until you think you can safely move onto solid food. When youíre ready, try some fruits or yogurt with honey to get both carbs and protein in that initial window. As you move past that first hour, tubers and more complex carb sources are good to include. As I tell everyone, try to avoid grain-products as much as possible when increasing carbs.

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