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Thread: What did your resident Grok used to eat? page

  1. #1
    Mike333's Avatar
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    What did your resident Grok used to eat?

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    Hey- so I just recently researched the diet of the indigenous people in my country (South Africa). I feel kinda stupid- you'd think it would be the first thing I did when considering a natural diet.

    Anyhow, the Bushmen people indigenous to South Africa valued water far more than food. Wikipedia acknowledges that due to their low-fat diet, women were late to menstruate and bear children. Protein and fat came from a whole range of >100 various creatures: wild game, caterpillars, grasshoppers etc with the occasional ostrich egg (equal to about 20 chicken eggs lol) and lots of tubers- very similar looking to sweet potatoes but I'm not sure exactly what they are.

    So to sum it up, the Groks who thrived in South Africa before I colonized the place were probably eating relatively little (they were too busy looking for water!!!) and thriving on a starch-based diet with lean proteins on the side. They were awesome hunters- it just so happened that the game animals in the desert were extremely lean, fast-running chaps.

    Not saying that I am a San- nor am I saying that you would necessary want to emulate every pattern of your local Grok's lifestyle. But I think it is far more relevant to research a Grok who shared your turf, than to base your diet on a Grok who lived in a distant land with completely different climates, fauna and flora.

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    iniQuity's Avatar
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    I wouldn't know where to start. I'm Peruvian, but my maternal grandmother (and my mom's entire side of the family) is black so there's got to be some Africa there, my mom herself is a product of a black woman and a VERY white man (who was never around, so I know nothing of his origins) so she's mixed. My father is white, his parents are both white, paternal grandfather was born in Spain, paternal grandmother was born in Italy, both lived in Peru. I was born in Peru but I wonder if I have any Inca blood at all given my background. To sum up... I have no desire to know what my ancestors ate, or even to find out WHO they were. I'm content eating the way I eat now, sorry to not really answer your question.

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    Interesting... from the far south to the far north. I am currently working in the Arctic, 900 miles from the north pole in North West Greenland. The Gork up here would be much the same as the ones that come floating by now and then. The local Inuits still hunt much like there ancestors, although with guns. Seal, fish, arctic hare, Polar Bear and Musk Ox! No bugs up here, unless you count the flys and mosquitos for about 2 weeks in the summer.

    Dave

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    Interesting :-)

    I suspect our resident Groks (UK) had less of an issue with finding water lol and probably needed more fat (most of the year) to keep warm. We didn't have potatoes but there must have been some sort of starchy vegetable. Hmmm I'm guessing. Probably a fair bit of wild growing fruits too? Our meat would probably have been a bit easier to catch as well as we don't have the huge wide open spaces - wild boar, deer, rabbit, hare plus probably fairly fatty birds, they would need a good fat supply to live in our cold water.

    I'm surmising - it'd be interesting to look into it a bit further.

    FF

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    gunn parker's Avatar
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    Sounds very interesting but for me, I was born in Wales, UK and moved to Australia when I was about seven.
    The local groks he did it tough I believe. Not much water out of the winter season and no real greens as such.

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    The Potawatomi lived here (northern IL), and from what I recall, they hunted deer and birds, fished, gathered wild rice and fruit, and grew beans, corn and squash. Doesn't sound bad at all...

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    Mike333's Avatar
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    Haha, Iniquity- I am speaking about your current location, not where your genes originated

    It just makes sense that the native people in the climate and setting you reside in would provide an interesting model on which to base your "natural" choices- seeing as we know that natural diets are diverse in macronutrient ratios and a lot of people really stress about the amount of fat:carbohydrate they consume. I just feel that the local people had access to local foods which enhanced their living with respect to that specific climate. Obviously, at the north pole the animals have tons of fat, yet there is no access to carbohydrate. But in the hotter climates, the game animals and even fish are much leaner...lots of them are really scrawny creatures. BUT there is significant carbohydrate concentrated in starches that my little Bushmen Grok are so good at digging up. So in general, I would imagine that the Groks living in the snow got their energy from blubber whilst the Groks hopping around the desert got their charge up over roasting potatoes and starches...and yep, they used to raid bee hives for a real taste of euphoria lol.

    It just interests me, the possibility that the relative abundance of carbs in a certain climate (sunny, relatively long days all year-round), could in fact be the catalyst that these Groks needed to conquer their lands, as opposed to those Groks snowed in at the poles. Of course the eskimos are an active bunch, but surely there is a difference in the natural activities of an equatorial or desert Grok vs. a polar Grok??? I'm an equatorial Grok these days- constantly buzzing around on carbohydrate fuel, but still shunting anything that comes from a packet. It feels great.

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    My family is first nations, Cree (Highbush Cree) so we lived in the woods, closer to the NWT. Lots of moose, birds, fish, berries, bullrushes, grasses, mushrooms. I'm sure there are tubers of sorts and nuts but by time I came along, my family was eating somewhat modern. Just add in a ton of moose meat and saskatoons

    (this is the same where I live too)
    Calm the f**k down.

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    Metismomma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Littlesigh View Post
    Interesting... from the far south to the far north. I am currently working in the Arctic, 900 miles from the north pole in North West Greenland. The Gork up here would be much the same as the ones that come floating by now and then. The local Inuits still hunt much like there ancestors, although with guns. Seal, fish, arctic hare, Polar Bear and Musk Ox! No bugs up here, unless you count the flys and mosquitos for about 2 weeks in the summer.

    Dave
    *shudder* One thing I don't miss about living up north is the pterodactyl sized mosquitos and the huge swarms of black flies.
    Calm the f**k down.

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    This is interesting, on the Native American diet.

    Guts and Grease: The Diet of Native Americans

    I don't know if I could go as far as eating an intestine full of half-digested grass, but I bet I wouldn't be sick as often if I did.

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