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Thread: I got an allotment :) page

  1. #1
    runningwild's Avatar
    runningwild is offline Senior Member
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    I got an allotment :)

    Primal Fuel
    Hi all,

    Just wanted to share the good news that, after 5 years of being on a waiting list in London i have finally got my hands on an allotment.

    Anyone got any good allotment tips? what to grow what not to grow etc

  2. #2
    ElaineC's Avatar
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    Woohoo, congrats! I would check out the book called "Square Foot Gardening", by Mel Bartholomew. Its a great gardening book on how to maximize what you grow in small amounts of space, and how to keep it all manageable.

    Now that I live in the country on a nice property, I've been wanting to get a garden going. This year I'm determined to make it go! My seed catalog has been on my kitchen table for weeks, I keep looking through it trying to make decisions. I tell ya, when I hear of what people in big cities have to go through to get a little bit of green space to grow things, it makes me appreciate what I have.

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    If you plant courgettes (aka zucchini), DO NOT plant all of the seeds in the packet, or you will be swimming in them.

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    Plant the stuff that is a) hard to get (but that can grow in London) and b) expensive! It usually makes the most financial sense to plant things like herbs rather than staple veggies within a small space (dill as opposed to onions, for example) because they usually cost so much at the store, with all the packaging and whatnot.
    I don't own a scale and don't care to!

  5. #5
    Saoirse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilikesubtitles View Post
    Plant the stuff that is a) hard to get (but that can grow in London) and b) expensive! It usually makes the most financial sense to plant things like herbs rather than staple veggies within a small space (dill as opposed to onions, for example) because they usually cost so much at the store, with all the packaging and whatnot.
    if we still had the "like" button, i'd click it,

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilikesubtitles View Post
    Plant the stuff that is a) hard to get (but that can grow in London) and b) expensive! It usually makes the most financial sense to plant things like herbs rather than staple veggies within a small space (dill as opposed to onions, for example) because they usually cost so much at the store, with all the packaging and whatnot.
    I agree totally with this - loads of herbs.

    Runningwild - I'm envious! Here in Sussex I have a small garden and it is heavy nasty clay. With rabbits! So herbs are perfect for me and they save a fortune at supermarket prices.

  7. #7
    Rocco Hill's Avatar
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    5 year waiting list in london? Wow, i better get on that list asap. I'm in the Islington area

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    [QUOTE=ElaineC;359898]Woohoo, congrats! I would check out the book called "Square Foot Gardening", by Mel Bartholomew. Its a great gardening book on how to maximize what you grow in small amounts of space, and how to keep it all manageable.
    QUOTE]

    I second the recommendation of "Square Foot Gardening". I used that book as a guide for my tiny little plot for a few years and was always amazed at how many vegetables I ended up with. Plus it was a good way to jump into gardening overall, which I had never done before. I learned a lot from that book.

  9. #9
    runningwild's Avatar
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    thanks for the tips i will check out the book - organic veggies here i come

  10. #10
    localad's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Find out from the 'neighbours' what grows best in the local soil. Try something a bit different and do 'swops'. At cropping time have a primal party for a few friends at the allotment; meaty bbq and fresh dug/picked veggies!

    PS. Don't try and grow skunk!
    activate the rhythm, the rhythm that has always been within

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