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Thread: Why didn't my blood sugar rise? page

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    pebblehead's Avatar
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    Why didn't my blood sugar rise?

    I've been somewhat low-carb for about a year (gave up pasta and bread), and have been concentrating on being primal since the beginning of the year. Today was a special occasion, and my husband and I ate out at his favorite restaurant and ended up at Ted Drewes after dinner. Ted Drewe's is a St. Louis institution, but it's far from primal as it's a frozen custard place.

    When we got home, I took my blood sugar and amazingly it was only 85. I had a frozen custard with cookie dough and brownie mix-ins one hour earlier. That's even lower than my fasting blood glucose, which is typically in the mid-90's. How is that even possible?

  2. #2
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    Because you've given your pancreas a year off, basically, and you got lucky - it wasn't completely destroyed, as some people's have been since they have been on the SAD/CW for decades. So it did its job, as it's supposed to do when you get the *occasional* blood sugar spike.
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    I'm assuming your mid-90s fasting blood glucose is taken with the same meter as your 85 post-prandial, so we'll leave out equipment error.

    I suppose that if you were sufficiently insulin sensitive and the glycemic load of the meal was sufficiently low you wouldn't have trouble clearing glucose from the occasional carby meal. I know cookie dough and brownies are basically all sugar but maybe the milk and egg (plus everyting else you ate beforehand) slowed digestion enough. Just a guess though.

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    That's pretty cool, and just confirms for me that eating primal is the way to go. I've had all the symptoms of insulin resistance for years, and both my parents (and 2 of my siblings) are type II, so anything that looks like a healthy response to sugar is welcome news.

    I had a drink with my dinner, and I wonder if that had something to do with it as well since I know that alcohol lowers my sugar. In any case, tomorrow I'm back to eating healthy!

    Edit: PS -- Yes, same meter was used, which is why I was shocked. My hubby, who is mostly SAD when on his own, but eats whatever I cook at home had a reading of 120.
    Last edited by pebblehead; 02-26-2011 at 08:54 PM.

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    It could mean different things.
    1.Your year of low carb has been restorative in regards to glucose control and insulin sensitivity.
    2.Your body released a lot of insulin to cover the " glucose hit" your non primal meal had.

    I think it would be helpful to note your typical postprandial numbers.

  6. #6
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    it means your body cleared the glucose....

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    or you ran home..........
    activate the rhythm, the rhythm that has always been within

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    as others said...your body did what it's supposed to do - it shuttled the extra glucose out of your bloodstream.
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    denise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennelmom View Post
    as others said...your body did what it's supposed to do - it shuttled the extra glucose out of your bloodstream.
    still getting my head round the science, so got to ask ... did it shuttle it into fat stores?? Where did it go - healthily or not??

    i know i should understand this by now. Need to reread GCBC

  10. #10
    pebblehead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    It could mean different things.
    1.Your year of low carb has been restorative in regards to glucose control and insulin sensitivity.
    2.Your body released a lot of insulin to cover the " glucose hit" your non primal meal had.

    I think it would be helpful to note your typical postprandial numbers.
    Re #2, I wondered about that, and suppose that's insulin doing what it's supposed to do. I used to get low blood sugars back in my pre-primal days, to the point where I'd almost black out. However, it usually took 2-3 hours after a high-carb meal before I'd crash. I even had a glucose tolerance test once, and for the 3 hour test my blood sugar stayed > 100, but by the time I drove home I was such a mess that I could barely think straight (no idea what my BS was at that point, but it had to have been low). My doctor had put me on a hypoglycemic diet anyway, since when the sugar did start to drop from the peak it did so all at once.

    The low blood sugars were really my main motivation for going low carb and eventually primal. For years, hypoglycemia was nearly indistinguishable from depression, and after messing around with my diet I realized that they were related. Knowing that those types of reactions are often a precursor to diabetes, and having the family history that I do, I figured I needed to do something. I haven't had a single low blood sugar "episode" in over a year, and even though winter is usually a dark time for me, I've felt pretty good all this year (although there are other reasons for that, too, like adequate vitamin D intake and a new job).

    For most meals that I cook myself, I stay below 110 1 hr postprandial, often < 100. I don't get to test myself much when going out to eat, but I remember testing my sugar after a nice Vietnamese pho meal (I ate some of the rice noodles, but left most of them in the bowl in favor of the broth and meat), and it was 140. So there are definitely some foods that leave my blood sugar high. However, this whole conversation makes me think that I should probably start testing at 30 minutes as well as an hour.

    Fasting glucose this morning is 104, 10 points higher than "normal" for me so it seems I didn't get off scot free.

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