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    Blake123's Avatar
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    hanging Leg Raises

    Just got a pull up bar/dip station a few weeks back and i want to incorporate hanging leg raises for abs and core but i cant keep my legs straight. is there a way to progress into these. im 17 and i at least thought my abs had decent strength or is it flexibility even though i am pretty flexible so im not sure

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    Al_Kavadlo's Avatar
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    Do them with your knees bent as a precursor to the straight leg version. Just think about pulling you knees to your chest without swinging.

    I'm actually planning a blog post on this exercise sometime in the next few weeks!
    "In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they couldn't be more different."

    "You can have anything you want, but you can't have everything you want."

    My blog: http://www.AlKavadlo.com


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    MightyAl's Avatar
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    I started by doing leg raises while laying down. Then I progressed to hanging bent knee raises. Then frog leg raises (legs are slightly bent). Now I am at straight leg raises. In fact I just did 3x15 last night on my doorway pull up bar.

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    bob
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    One thing I have learned from Al's blog is that progressions work. I wanted to perform L-sit pull ups and chin ups, bought could only muster a couple. I started with my knees bent to the chest, then alternated between knees to the chest and legs at 90 degrees, and now I can knock out multiple sets with legs straight. The progression took me about four weeks.

    Listen to Al, he knows!

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    Thanks Guys i appreciate it! i know now i'll get there with time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blake123 View Post
    ...i at least thought my abs had decent strength or is it flexibility even though i am pretty flexible so im not sure
    It's probably flexibility. In doing straight-leg raises you're effectively stretching the hamstring over two joints (the extended knee, and the flexed hip). This will prevent full range of motion at your hips. It's the same reason you feel a tight pull in your hamstrings when you bend over and touch your toes -- except there gravity is helping you, whereas with the hanging leg raises you're fighting gravity.

    Is there a reason you want to do the straight leg version? You can work your abs equally well either way -- in fact, I find that people who do the straight leg version often end up working their hip-flexors far more than their abs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ciep View Post
    It's probably flexibility. In doing straight-leg raises you're effectively stretching the hamstring over two joints (the extended knee, and the flexed hip). This will prevent full range of motion at your hips. It's the same reason you feel a tight pull in your hamstrings when you bend over and touch your toes -- except there gravity is helping you, whereas with the hanging leg raises you're fighting gravity.

    Is there a reason you want to do the straight leg version? You can work your abs equally well either way -- in fact, I find that people who do the straight leg version often end up working their hip-flexors far more than their abs.
    I agree CIEP. I do mine with bent knees and curl them to my chest. Im pretty sure you activate your abs more when you curl the pelvis towards the chest. Instead of just lifting the legs. Then again i also have a herniated L5 ,,so keeping my legs straight sometimes puts a little too much strain on my back.

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