Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: So the eggs I've been buying are not truly "free-range" after all page 2

  1. #11
    primal_jessjane's Avatar
    primal_jessjane is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    569

    1

    Shop Now


    Earth Momma, I can't afford to buy raw butter and farm-raised chicken eggs either! Even buying a jar of coconut oil was a bit of a stretch, considering how quickly I've already gone through it...But figure that you're doing the best you can in your circumstance. Give up?!? Can you really justify that the CW diet is worth reverting back to if your chickens eat feed?! Come on now.


  2. #12
    jessher's Avatar
    jessher is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    13

    1



    A farmer who sells eggs has to use feed for his chickens. If he let them "just" eat grass/seeds/bugs they probably would not be daily layers and he wouldn't have enough eggs to sell. Chickens have to be very well fed to lay every day.

    It makes a huge difference in the nutritional quality of the eggs to allow the hens to graze in addition to their regular feed. The yolks will be more orange and the eggs will taste better and have a more optimal nutrition profile.

    Don't be afraid to eat animals that eat grains IF the animal was meant to eat that stuff! I don't like eating grain fed beef but grain fed chickens is ok with me because as far as I know, chickens eat a more diverse diet than cows and haven't adapted to a grass only diet like cows have (ruminants).

    It sounds like you have a great farmer to work with. You are lucky to have that resource. He is helping you learn more about food and farming and that is a great thing!


  3. #13
    hannahc's Avatar
    hannahc is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    1,134

    1



    Ha maba I was able to buy a pound of raw grass-fed butter that way too! It was a secret I liked it, but the hubs thought it tasted weird (raw grass-fed dairy definitely has a nuttier taste to it). It was $11/pound though, so I just bought hormone free/organic butter the next time.


    Our chicks are 15 days old now (and already trying to escape from their box!), and they'll have to be supplemented with feed I'm pretty sure. We have a lot of grass in the backyard, and they'll get veggie/table scraps as well, but they will need more food than that. And Darlene, chickens will literally eat anything. Even cooked chicken...I've seen it, it's kinda creepy. But seriously, people in other countries think it's weird to buy "chicken feed" because they are like garbage disposals.

    You are what you eat,
    and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan


  4. #14
    jessher's Avatar
    jessher is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    13

    1



    Regarding butter: if you have a grass fed milk source, but some heavy cream (I can find local grass fed milk and heavy cream at my Whole Foods) and make your own butter. It's VERY easy to do.

    I just put the cream in a Mason jar and shake it until I have a ball of butter surrounded by buttermilk. I squeeze the buttermilk out as best I can, then freeze my ball of butter for about 5-10 minutes, wash it, and squeeze again. A few rounds of this and most of the buttermilk will be gone and you can add a touch of salt or any other ingredients you want. It's very tasty!

    Google it and give it a try.

    Also, at Whole Foods there is a brand of butter that is not local but is from grass fed cows. It's called Sraus and it's also organic.


  5. #15
    chocolatechip69's Avatar
    chocolatechip69 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    6

    1



    I also had a similar experience with eggs. At first, I was buying cage-free eggs from the store. The yolk I thought were a bit brighter than regular eggs but still not as bright as I remember them to be when I would go visit my grandma who lived in the village when I was growing up. Then I dished out more money for organic cage-free and I still didn't see any difference. Then I found some farm brown cage-free eggs from one of the bulk foods store and was so excited I bought 6 dozen right away. Came home and similar color.

    I finally found a farm through Eat Wild just 20 minutes away from where I live that sells cage-free eggs and grass-fed beef. I called them up and went to get some eggs. She showed me around and all of her chickens were just hanging out outside. She said she does supplement them with feed but they spend most of the day outside searching for bugs. She then threw a big bag of dried out bread to them right in front of me and I started having second thoughts. The chicks went crazy and gobbled up all the bread in no time. I got 5 dozen of eggs from them and when I came home and cracked couple of them open to make a scrambly I rejoiced. Finally...really dark orange, big, fresh eggs.

    The farmer lady told me that the chickens HAVE to be supplemented with feed because they don't get enough food otherwise and stop eating eggs. So it's true, maba


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1



    Thy will eat anything.


    My dad was abandoned in Thailand after his ship left port in the middle of battle (Vietnam War) and he and his fellow Navy buddies had to resort to eating a chicken that was pecking around in the streets.


    Little did he know how bad his food-poisoning would be since that little chicken ate anything and everything, including the excrement that its food was lying in!!! Ewwwww....


    To this day, he still says that was the worst case of food poisoning he's ever experienced!


  7. #17
    nina_70's Avatar
    nina_70 Guest

    1



    I agree...feed supplementation for chickens is pretty normal unless the farmer has a very strict rotation of cows on the pasture (which generate lots of poo and so, subsequent to that, lots of bugs). There are some fully-sustained, fully-pastured chickens but it does require a pretty strict rotation....chickens following cows rotated to new pasture daily. Even then, things usually change a bit in winter since it's too cold to keep the birds outside (and the cows come in too). In general, if the chickens have access to pasture and are eating some bugs you're getting eggs that are very close to the best you can buy. I'd keep buying them.


  8. #18
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
    OnTheBayou is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida, USA, Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
    Posts
    152

    1

    PrimalCon New York


    Chickens and pigs, the garbage disposals of every farm family.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •