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  1. #1
    Nix's Avatar
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    Nix is offline Senior Member
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    Unhappy Living Over Seas

    Primal Fuel
    Hello everyone!
    Here is the problem I have been having. I live over seas in South Korea. My food options are extremely limited. I can't go buy a grass fed cows. Korea is 75% mountains, honestly, there are no cows. There are no co-ops. Also, grocery stores are extremely limited. If I want to eat veggies there are my choices: Lettuce (cabbage), carrot, pumpkin, eggplant, broccoli cucumber, onions (leeks), radish, potatoes, and sometimes tomatoes. Traditional markets don't usually have veggies in the winter, if they do they are all imported and covered in pesticides. Its a great day when I go shopping and find something other then these veggies listed above. Also the only somewhat healthy oils available are olive oil, and sesame seed oil. I can get fish, there are tons of fish markets. That seems to be the only plus. It is also extremely expensive here to buy foods that aren't already cooked. For example most Korean people eat several side dishes at meals. You buy all the side dishes pretty much already prepared at the traditional markets. You can't just buy seaweed, its already been processed. I am just really frustrated. I don't know how many more meals I can have consisting of different types of lettuce, onion, carrot, and broccoli. I can't even find spinach here half the time. And like I said, I can forget finding any kind of meat that is organic, in fact I can find a lot that seem very proud to put "grain fed" on the label.

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    SlimIcy is offline Senior Member
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    I don't have any first hand experience with this, but I can offer what I'd do in the circumstance: base the diet around the local fish. Also I'm sure fish oil is plentiful, and if I remember my Andrew Zimmern correctly it's basically fermented fish stomach (sounds really primal). If you're getting a large portion of your meat from fish, there's not a huge problem with eating grain fed beef, because you're getting such a good omega-3 input from the fish.

  3. #3
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    How about eggs and chicken or duck?

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    Nix's Avatar
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    Nix is offline Senior Member
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    Yeah there is meat. Everything but fish is wicked expensive but its there. It's just all the other stuff. Like coconut oil, flax seed, almond flour, cheese, spices etc. There just aren't any. Like there just aren't any veggie choices. So looking at a recipe on here, I can't make anything because I can't get any of the ingredients. I can't get alive vinegar, cold pressed oils.... there are just none.

  5. #5
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    Nix,
    I lived in Korea (Daegu and Seoul) for a bunch of years, just left there a few months ago, actually. Yes, it will be hard to find grass-fed beef and quality oils. From what it sounds like, you're on the economy and have to shop at E-mart and such?

  6. #6
    Digby's Avatar
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    Can you order online? I order 2/3 of grassfed meats/poultry/fish online. Even Amazon has lots of low carb/ primal foods.
    This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it. Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Any given day you are surrounded by 10,000 idiots.
    Lao Tsu, founder of Taoism

  7. #7
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    I'm in Thailand, and I had similar concerns at first. But after a while, I found a lot of good alternatives, and made myself a Thai version of Paleo that works pretty well and is actually cheaper than my normal grocery bill. Maybe you can do that too. Only exception is the grass fed stuff; just forget about it. All these are some of the prices we pay for getting to live exciting lives abroad, eh?

  8. #8
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    One thing I did while in Korea was a sort of cultural exchange. I found a Korean who wanted to learn English (well, to be honest, he found me) and he found an American who wanted to know more about Korea (that would be me). We'd get together and hang out. I'd talk to him in English and help him with his conversational English skills, idioms, and the like (real English not text books stuff) and he'd take me places and teach me about traditional Korean things - a pottery workshop, little restaurants where literally there was no menu you got what Aji-ma was cooking, markets which seemed to be stuffed into some small alley you would walk right past without noticing.

    The point being that if you hook up with a local you can find out where to get the things you are looking for or find if they are even available. If nothing else he/she can ask what is in the preprepared foods so you can do your best to avoid added stuff you do not want. Also, you learn a ton about the country, which rocks unto itself.

  9. #9
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    DianeThePurple is offline Senior Member
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    Are you friendly with any locals? See if you can find out what traditional diet their grandparents ate.

    Most traditional diets are pretty free of fake crap, which is the main point. You will do fine, you don't have to knock yourself out trying to precisely replicate what people are doing "back home".

    Good luck! And remember to have fun.

  10. #10
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    I lived in Seoul for a while. I'm in California now. Difference of course - here we can get just about any fresh produce any time of year because it is coming from China, Chile, etc. There it is what is right off the farm, the old-fashioned way. Good news for you is that the tomatoes are delicious, the winter apples and pears are out of this world. What's available is tasty, and not bland.

    Beef is expensive but you should be able to get pork more cheaply?

    Visit this site for recipes: Maangchi.com.

    And rest assured that by spring you will have a much broader selection of fresh produce and remind yourself that you are eating close to the farm.

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