Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62

Thread: Sugar vs Starch in Vegetables page

  1. #1
    MalPaz's Avatar
    MalPaz is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    2,790

    Sugar vs Starch in Vegetables

    Shop Now
    skimming the PHD site, Paul said this:
    The result is that eating vegetables isnít an effective way to meet the bodyís glucose needs. Several pounds of vegetables might add 30 glucose calories net, which is small compared to the 600 we need daily. I donít think itís worth the trouble to count them.
    Most of the vegetables deliver carbs as sugars rather than as starch.

    Is this why people advocate potatoes over rutabagas, winter squash etc. Also, would eating root vegetables like this vs potatoes mean your getting fructose vs getting starch?

    trying to understand... mostly because it seems people do well when they add 'starch' like potatores/rice and dont do as well when they add roots like rutabaga or butternut squash

  2. #2
    yodiewan's Avatar
    yodiewan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    3,349
    I was under the impression that most of the carbs in winter squash (including butternut) were from starch. NutritionData doesn't break it down totally, but only shows 4g/21.5g as sugar. I know that the carbs in non-starchy vegetables like lettuce are mostly from sugar. Maybe that's what Paul is referring to. Also, I'm not sure if the sugar in vegetables is fructose or what.... just checked ND again. Romaine lettuce has 390mg glucose and 800mg fructose (+2.1g fiber) per 100g (which is a LOT of lettuce). So yeah, I guess veggies do provide more fructose than glucose in general... probably, heh.

  3. #3
    MalPaz's Avatar
    MalPaz is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    2,790
    so for glucose go to potatoes and for fructose go to vegetables>?

  4. #4
    peril's Avatar
    peril is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    2,680
    Glucose and starch, which breaks down to glucose, are preferable to fructose and anything containing fructose, such as sucrose and HFCS, because of the metabolic damage wrought by fructose.

    Root vegetables are mostly starch. Winter squash and other vegetables which are actually fruits contain varying amounts of starch, glucose, sucrose and fructose. Winter squashes (we call them all pumpkins) get a rough time on this site but they are only about 20% carb, most of which is starch. Unless you're doing VLC there should be plenty of room in your diet for pumpkin. There is in mine.

    If you want fructose (why?), go for the traditional fruits. Anything sweet enough to be commonly called a fruit has plenty of fructose. The fruits that aren't that sweet are usually called vegetables and have little fructose
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

  5. #5
    MalPaz's Avatar
    MalPaz is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    2,790
    well i wasnt curious about fruit, IMO its all junk, but i was curious of the distinction in fructose content between like rutabagas and 'pumpkins'(winter squash) vs potatoes

  6. #6
    Bushrat's Avatar
    Bushrat is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,685
    Quote Originally Posted by MalPaz View Post
    skimming the PHD site, Paul said this:
    The result is that eating vegetables isn’t an effective way to meet the body’s glucose needs. Several pounds of vegetables might add 30 glucose calories net, which is small compared to the 600 we need daily. I don’t think it’s worth the trouble to count them.
    Most of the vegetables deliver carbs as sugars rather than as starch.

    Is this why people advocate potatoes over rutabagas, winter squash etc. Also, would eating root vegetables like this vs potatoes mean your getting fructose vs getting starch?

    trying to understand... mostly because it seems people do well when they add 'starch' like potatores/rice and dont do as well when they add roots like rutabaga or butternut squash
    What about protein to glucose?

  7. #7
    FairyRae's Avatar
    FairyRae is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,996
    I wrote to Paul Jaminet from PHD about this a little bit ago. Here is what I asked:

    "Would parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, celeriac and other root vegetables count as 'safe
    starches'? What about winter squash? I'm just interested to learn if there
    are any safe starches besides tapioca, white rice, potatoes and sweet
    potatoes."

    This was his response:

    All of those root vegetables are healthy and nutritious foods and we
    recommend them. However, many of them don't have a lot of calories, or have
    calories mostly in the form of sugars rather than starches. So we don't
    usually call them "safe starches." But they're great to eat!

    You might want to check calorie levels at nutritiondata.com for your
    favorite foods. If you rely on those root vegetables for carbs you might
    find you're not getting very many calories.
    Interesting stuff...
    My Before/After Pics
    Are you new here? Be sure to check these links FIRST, before reading anything on the forum! Succeed & PB 101

    "I am a work in progress." -Ani DiFranco

  8. #8
    dwkdnvr's Avatar
    dwkdnvr is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    75
    This is interesting - I have been meaning to follow up on this basic idea after seeing a post on the PHD site where he shows that the sugar content of sweet potatoes is actually very high - the sugar:starch ratio is actually much better in regular white potatoes. Given how sweet potatoes seem to be the generally recommended 'good starch source' this surprised me a bit; maybe it shouldn't have since it says 'sweet' right there in the name :-)

  9. #9
    confused_monkey's Avatar
    confused_monkey is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    107
    Coincidentally, I can't handle sweet potatoes but I could handle regular potatoes.

  10. #10
    MalPaz's Avatar
    MalPaz is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    2,790
    Quote Originally Posted by confused_monkey View Post
    Coincidentally, I can't handle sweet potatoes but I could handle regular potatoes.
    +1!!!!!!!!

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •