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Thread: Rendering Your Own Lard page 2

  1. #11
    Diana Renata's Avatar
    Diana Renata is offline Senior Member
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    I just wanted to throw in my 2 cents about rendering fat. I did some beef fat a week or so back, and it was really simple.


    I put the fat in my pan (cast iron) and set the heat on low, and left it for an hour or so. There was a nice pool of fat in the pan, so I just poured it through a strainer into my crock. Return the pan to low heat until there's another pool of fat. Strain into crock. Return to heat, strain into crock.


    I turned it off for the night, and started it up again the next day after work. Heat, strain, heat, strian. Now I have a lovely crock full of beautiful white beef fat. I just bought another small crock so that I can work with pork.


  2. #12
    annadragon's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried this in a crockpot? I've wrangled a promise from my farmer that he'll get me some pork fat (he sells it to a local restaurant) and I don't think I've got a pot big enough for the job but my crock might work.


  3. #13
    Diana Renata's Avatar
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    That would probably work. The only reason I opted not to was simply because of pouring. It would have been more difficult to pour out of a crockpot than a frying pan. You could try it and see how it works. I'm sure as long as you use low heat it'll be ok.


  4. #14
    SerialSinner's Avatar
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    Check this out:

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/09/17/FDI7124Q6V.DTL


    I recently lived in SF for some months (in The Mission). I loved every minute of it, and was blown away by the food.


    I perceived a huge hype for vegetarian and vegan food during my stay, so I'm glad to see such a praise for Lard coming from the area.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  5. #15
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    We cut our fat into roughly 1/2' cubes (trimmed of any meat) and put them into a big steel pot on a flame tamer on low heat. It takes us between 8 and 16 hours, depending upon what we are doing. It needs regular stirring to stop any fat from burning on the bottom and we start siphoning lard off about 2/3 of the way through (strained prior to cooling and storing).


    Higher heat = shorter cooking time and cracklings (the fat gets solid on the outside and crackles up). However the lard turns brown quicker and will smell stronger. Dark brown crackling are burnt and taste bad. You want them to be medium brown and fluffy. That way they ooze out liquid fat when you chomp them


    Lower heat = longer time and no cracklings. The fat will release all of the lard and sort of dissolve into a squidgy brown mess, giving you more lard at the end. This also allows you to get more lard before it goes brown.


    We go for the slow option and our lard is light amber when liquid and pure white when cold. I think this is the best result. We do up to maybe 15lb? of fat at once and we want to get the highest quantity and quality. This means we miss out on the cracklings, but we can't eat a few lb at once and we would rather have the extra pint or two of lard.


    You can probably make cracklings by just deep frying some cubes of fat in lard? We might try this sometime when we are deep frying some meat...

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  6. #16
    erik.cisler's Avatar
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    Interesting. So are pork rinds just cracklings? I found a nice bag of the things at Whole Foods. No hydrogenated fats, made the "old-fashioned way," which I'm assuming means fried in their own fat.


  7. #17
    Tarlach's Avatar
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    Pork rinds are skin/fat done in an oven (to make them dry). They are usually full of salt if you buy them. You can make them at home though.


    Cracklings are deep fried skin/fat and are wet and full of liquid when warm.

    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

  8. #18
    rahchis's Avatar
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    Sinner and Ecala, I know of a farmer out of Texas that specializes in grass-fed animals, inluding pig. His name is Ted Slanker. I buy from him inbulk. His prices are pretty good. His site is www.slankersgrassfedmeat.com.


  9. #19
    Garden Diva's Avatar
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    One of my favorite blogs (along with MDA!) is Stephan's Whole Health Source. He wrote a piece on rendering lard in an oven. Find it here: http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.co...d-iv-lard.html


  10. #20
    Wulf's Avatar
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    Lazy persons' method: put pork fat in crock pot, cover with water, leave on low 8-24 hours, put the whole crock in the fridge till cool, remove solid lard to another container (remelt in microwave if you need or just chop it to fit another container).

    Yes, pork fat is actually widely available, and is often the cheapest thing in the meat section, you can find it at almost every grocer in the US for about $1-$2 per pound. At that price, it's cheaper than the cheapest vegetable oil !

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