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Thread: erythritol, sugar alcohol, carbs, and insulin page 2

  1. #11
    sofiawahaj's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    Has anyone does this with any kind of food?


  2. #12
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    Good news MamaSofi, SassaFrass88, & other erythritol lovers; erythritol is zero calories, zero glycemic impact & zero net-carbs. That means it won't raise your blood sugar whatsoever, and zero-net, aka, unavailable carbs aren't counted the same way as available carbs because they aren't converted into calories. Erythritol is perfect for a low-carb diet & absolutely safe for people with diabetes! =)


    I work for ZSweet® & we use all natural erythritol & fruit extracts in our sweetener to create a healthy, delicious alternative to sugar & artificial sweeteners. Please visit my blog for lots of great information on erythritol & comparisons with other sweeteners. http://zsweetallnaturalsweetener.blogspot.com/2009/01/benefits-of-zsweet.html


    ZSweet® was recommended by Dr.'s Nicholas Perricone, Andrew Weil & Julian Whitaker and is sold in Whole Foods Markets nationwide. It's a healthy option more people should know about.


  3. #13
    Ecala's Avatar
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    Hmmmm... skeptical. Looks a little like SPAM to me.


    I'm sticking to stevia.


  4. #14
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    Any sweetener raises insulin, but since there aren't as many carbs there to go in the fat cells, I think it is probably better than sugar and fructose...

    Also people who drink 3 diet sodas and sugar free junk every day who low carb (like Atkins, etc. (not to blame the genius) who don't necessarily care about natural foods) still loose weight...

    It would be nice to know which ones raised the insulin the most though. Some say stevia is worse (raises insulin more) than splenda... even though the former is natural. There are a lot of studies on pubmed that show stevia lowers blood sugar and is insulinotropic.

    I don't know. Just enjoy your treats when you do cheat and stay away from agave and fructose.


  5. #15
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    OnTheBayou is offline Senior Member
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    This matter about sweeteners raising insulin as a psychological phenomena bugs me. Like CW, it's almost always with a "may" qualifier.


    I'd like to see some studies, and ones that can show it is a common phenomena and not relegated to just a small percentage of dieters.


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    I agree OTB. Seems like this thing is still 'open-ended' to me.


  7. #17
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    Well, I am ready to be the guinea pig here! I just gotta figure out HOW! I am willing to test the effects of different sweeteners on my insulin response. My hypothesis is that sugar, honey, agave will elicit the highest rise in insulin. And splenda will be next. And xylitol, erythritol and stevia will cause the smallest insulin response.


    I am thinking that I could do a 24hr fast (to eliminate any other carbs in my body), then eat a tsp of the sweet poison and measure my glucose with a glucose meter before ingestion and every 20mins after (for maybe 100 minutes?). It would take many days of fasting, but eventually, I would gather some preliminary data to see how these different sweeteners affect my insulin response.


    What do you guys think?


  8. #18
    klcarbaugh's Avatar
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    AHHH!... you guys missed my post??

    You can search pub med for tons of articles on stevia releasing insulin (OnTheBayou... go look)

    MamaSofi, it would be a pain in the butt to try to do an self-test, but I think the way to check is get a blood glucose meeter and test strips, etc. Then fast for probably 12 hours or so. Reintroduce one artificial sweetener and don't eat anything with it (maybe dissolve it in water) So splenda would HAVE to be the pure liquid kind, same with Pure stevia. Measure the blood glucose directly before you consume the one serving equivalent of the sweetner, then measure glucose levels again at set times after until two hours or so have passed (like 10 min, 20 min, 40 min, 1 hour, 1.5 hours, 2 hours after ingestion without any other food) and record. Do this entire process again a few days or a week later untill you have tested all the sweeteners you want to. If your blood glucose goes down, then the sweetener evoked an insulin response.

    This is assuming that the substances are is completely indigestible and won't taint the test levels by slightly raising blood sugar. If you are really up to doing this, try it with coconut oil too becasue I think it causes insulin release as well.

    Sorry if the answer you were looking for involved eating baked fake foods or artificially sweetened ice cream. I don't think eating the sweeteners with food would make for an accurate test unless you ate the item with no sweeteners over and over and measured to get averages (because your body reacts to food differently all the time, even if it is the exact same food), then ate it with the sweetener over and over to get more averages to compare (and determine statistical significance, t-test, etc.).You would need to fast for these also, and you'd need a food scale.


    Our bodies might also behave differently eating a stevia muffin than drinking a glass of water with stevia in it than eating ice cream with stevia in it... so it wouldn't be that accurate, but I still would like to see what happens.


  9. #19
    Anand Srivastava's Avatar
    Anand Srivastava is offline Senior Member
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    Is insulin really the problematic thing?


    In my opinion the Glycation effect of sugars is the one really problematic part of sugars. This is why I prefer glucose over the other sugars. It causes the least amount of glycation.


    If anybody can show that erythritol, sugar alcohols, stevia, etc do not cause glycation then I would consider them safer.


    The whole insulin resistance and leptin resistance problem arises from glycation of these receptors. Fructose is the major agent causing these. I am not sure the others will not do this.


    With fructose we know what the safe limits are, about 20gm per 8hours for a person with healthy liver. I am not sure what the safe limit is for the other sugars. This does include the fructose from fruits and vegetables, so don't use the whole at once.


    I am particularly wary of sugars that are not recognized by the body, and for that reason are zero calories, because it means that they are free to cause glycation.


    Just use maltose and glucose to sweeten your stuff. Honey and other natural sweeteners are not that bad within limits. I would think you should avoid ingesting unknown agents.


    Our research labs are not doing a very good jobs, we already know from their recommendation. They will give pro-sweetener advice when the sweetener company is sponsoring the research and anti-sweetener when some other lobby is sponsoring the research.


    In paleo stick to natural stuff, that was available to our paleolithic ancestors, and eat it sparingly, as did they. Don't get too much enamoured by low carb as an end in itself.


  10. #20
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    What do you mean by "glycation" Anand? That is not the process of binding triglycerides... I know about HbA1c levels, etc. and AGE products. The inflammation due to sugar/fructose consumption isn't the only problem here...


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