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Thread: Primal Mom, Primal Baby page

  1. #1
    Dr. Bork Bork's Avatar
    Dr. Bork Bork is offline Senior Member
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    Primal Mom, Primal Baby

    Primal Fuel
    So for the umpteenth time in a month or so, my toddler is sick. She has an appointment to see the doc in an hour. She sounds like a circus seal this time.
    After going over to the Primal side, I feel that I'm the one making my child sick (b/c it's convenient to feed her toaster streudels, lunchables, and "fruit" snacks). I know something dramatic needs to happen, and I wonder if having baby go primal would make her so she's not sick every 5 mins.
    My problem is this: SHE'S SO DARN PICKY! She's the type of kid who will whine & tantrum for an hour or so before dinner, and then refuse to eat dinner.

    So, I'm wondering what the heck to feed my little one and improve her life forever. She's pretty good about eating meat & cheese, and can sometimes be bribed to do things with vegetables (she likes them), and fruit. So there's a base to start with. However, she doesn't like eggs, and pancakes are iffy. She also has issues with some textures (oatmeal like substances are out). I've been trying to follow her lead on hunger better, but I know clean eating is going to benefit her immensely.

    Help from other moms of picky/finicky groklings, I implore you to help me & mine make the primal leap.
    --Trish (Bork)
    TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
    http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
    FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    JenCat's Avatar
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    I so wish I had know about all this stuff when my kids were little. My oldest (12) has major eating problems, in part, because I catered to him. I think I reinforced his fear of food.

    If she eats meat, cheese, and veggies, give her those. She can eat them for breakfast, if she wants. Cook everything in lots of butter or coconut oil. She really doesn't need anything more. Vary the veggies and meat to expand her tastes. After a while, maybe introduce eggs again. try cooking them in every possible way, again with lots of butter. (My picky eater like soft-boiled eggs with toast. You can use coconut bread toast.) Put them on your plate. ENJOY them. That sometimes makes the kids want to take it from you. It might be tricky to always have meat cooked and on hand, but it will be good for both of you.

  3. #3
    Shijin13's Avatar
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    I'm primal, DH and dd aren't perse - they still eat grains - though I'm working on DH... we're doing less grains at home for them now after DH read an article on Gary Taube - As for dd - I don't have control over what she eats at DCP - and I've noticed if I send food she' won't eat it b/c the other kids aren't. so what we do - is make sure she's got lots of fruits/veggies pre-cut up so she can snack when she wants too. WE also keep string cheese, salami, smoked oysters, trout, sardines and salmon around for easy eats. some times she'll want smoked oysters for cheese so I'll open an can and let her get a toothpick out and stab the oysters and cheese and eat those. She's also a dried fruit fiend - but I try to make sure she has some meat and cheese when she eats them.

    dd is pretty adventurous - she'll try anything at least once. There are days she wants pasta for dinner and we do rice pasta. I control as much as I can. we send goats milk and juice (watered down 1/3 juice to 2/3waterh to dcp - I realize not the greatest but its what works)

    Right now I'm trying to figure out how to send primal food to ds dcp - which is a bit hard b/c they are muslim - they won't feed or touch meat that isn't halal... so we're working on that...

    I think w/ toddlers you've just got to set out different foods and eat them yourself - if you want them to eat them. Now I'm not talking snacking - but for lunch one day do smoked salmon w/cream cheese (Assuming your tolerant of dairy) and onions, do veggie sticks, veggie trees (Cauliflour/broccoli), some times if dd isn't eating enough veggies we'll puree them up and hide them in our foods. yogurt is a big GO TO food for dd - she loves it - it can be the yobaby or greek yougurt or yogurt DH makes on the weekends - as long as she has yogurt she's good. And when she wants grains - we always pair it with a fat/protein balance... I'm still working on her... but we'll get there. .her favourite snack is bacon... cook some up in the oven - reserve the fat, and store the bacon in a ziploc bag - easy treat

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    queenbee's Avatar
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    Brand-spankin' new to the forum, and I registered just to encourage you to go for it. My kid (3.5 yo) was constantly sick his first 2.5 years (and both myself and DH). When things didn't improve after going GF, DF, and egg-free, our ND suggested a blood allergy test. As a result, we had a long list of "avoid" foods for him. Things got better when we eliminated those foods, but they improved much more when the three of us went primal in our diets. Last winter, we were getting sick, being sick, or recovering from illness (would take weeks for a stupid cold to run its course through us), with few days of health in between, AND we had the flu (real, knock-down for weeks flu) twice. This winter, we've had two mild colds that have hardly made a dent in our normal lives. SO WORTH IT.
    (we also replaced our carpeting with hardwood floors to reduce molds and dust mites in our house)
    As for picky-ness, I don't have much advice since my son isn't picky at all, though when he's hungry, he'll eat up a plate of raw veggies if it's out for him instead of begging me for sweets (fruit, dried fruit, etc), but if it's not already out, we run into tantrums over what his snack will be.

  5. #5
    fitmom's Avatar
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    I've also noticed that if I put out some snacks...sliced apples or carrots and dip or guacamole or leftovers, BEFORE anyone asks, the kids come into the kitchen and take the path of least resistance, eating what's there. But if I ask them 'what would you like to eat?" they act like rude foodies (can you add just one pinch of salt, and don't cook my eggs in too much butter, because I don't like that (since yesterday). And they don't leave tips.

  6. #6
    Shijin13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitmom View Post
    I've also noticed that if I put out some snacks...sliced apples or carrots and dip or guacamole or leftovers, BEFORE anyone asks, the kids come into the kitchen and take the path of least resistance, eating what's there. But if I ask them 'what would you like to eat?" they act like rude foodies (can you add just one pinch of salt, and don't cook my eggs in too much butter, because I don't like that (since yesterday). And they don't leave tips.
    +1000000000000 its so true about them not tipping! DH doesn't either... though he does do the dishes... so that might balance it out!

  7. #7
    EvansMom's Avatar
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    Well, I have this problem too and a partial solution only.

    Sometimes a little perspective helps. I have a son, and I like to remind myself that when he goes to elementary school he will be the one who chooses what to eat and that I cannot control his food choices like I can now. He will have access to free-range carbs and sugars in school, from other kids lunches and vending machines. So I encourage him to eat good now, but allow him to eat varying amounts of carbs and sugar as well so he doesn't go overboard then. I did as a child and adult, and survived.

    What works for us is this: a well-rounded meal that he helps choose (cabbage or celery? meat or nuts? raspberries or apple? etc). He gets all three food groups every meal (fruit, veggie, protein) and sometimes a gluten-free carb or sugar afterwards or with a snack later.

    He does not eat what we eat at every meal, and this is very helpful and solves many of our battles before they start. He eats raw food snack-like meals. We sit down together without the TV, and if he plays and doesn't eat, then we leave the plate there for him to snack on until its finished. He does "drive-by" snacking after our meal is over. The important part we feel, is that we all sat together. Whether we all ate the same food or ate at all is not the point for us.

    He gets a childs probiotic mixed in with yogurt (1-2T) every morning. He likes oatmeal and that is okay with me. He eats gluten-free carbs when he eats them (pretzels, crackers, oatmeal, breads, etc) and these are easy to find at Whole foods or trader Joes or even in the grocery store.

    I encourage him to try new things daily (we have a magnet chart reward system and trying new things is on there). I explain why carbs and sugar is bad to him in words he understands (tantrums, bad teeth, etc) and why he cannot eat sugar all day.

    The other thing that helps is to realize that his immune system is still developing. He gets sick. Now that I am paleo, however, that does not mean that I will get sick too, and that is a blessing. He got sick constantly the first few months of p/t daycare and that lasted for about 5-6 months and then slowed down to a cold or three a year.

    Good luck and best wishes. I hope that maybe some of this rambling will give you some new ideas to try.

  8. #8
    Melody's Avatar
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    read the ingredients of those convenience foods. it is garbage/poison. think about that when you go to buy it. do you really want to fuel your child's body with that? will your kid eat nuts/meats/fruit?
    FYI this was the first winter my 5 year old has been off of gluten entirely and the first winter that she wasn't sick for 2-3 months straight. the convenience of not having to cook is outwieighed by the inconvenience of a sick child, isn't it? do you work? make stuff on sunday for the week. otherwise just keep quick primal foods around, almond flour muffins, fruits, cheeses, meats, nuts. lara bars for your purse.

  9. #9
    zoebird's Avatar
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    you essentially have an addict in the drivers seat on your hands. she has a will (like a bull) and the desire (like and imp) and you just have to learn to not hear the tantrums until she realizes she isn't going to win. in this instance, she isn't picky, she has too much power. and she wields it!

    so, time for you to take back the power.

    i recommend getting rid of all fo the crap you feed her. give it to neighbors, donate it to charity, whatever. then, follow this rule: a child will NOT starve themselves. they might whine, fuss, tantrum, and refuse to eat for days (usually no more than 2), but that's that. you serve what you serve.

    i also put things out for DS. right now, he has veggie sticks and mayo and the remainder of his scrambled eggs out for him. this is his "second breakfast."

    so, start here: bacon, eggs, veggies with some oil, then as a dessert, berries with yogurt or coconut cream. then, a few hours later, you put out some veggies and some dip (Guac, mayo, cheese, whatever is in your ok list). just put it out, dont' say anything. she'll find it if she wants it. then, lunch, then put something out, and then dinner. then she should be heading to bed.

    she might spend day one fuming, freaking out, crying, whining, and even hitting, flailing, and biting. she might spend next day making high pitch noises and grumbling. but by day 3, she will be eating.

    make sure that water is always available to her, and that food is. "this is what we are eating now" and "you'll get used to it" and "everything will be fine. this food is very good." and so on will help. we taught our son to walk properly with us (by the rules) this way. He would walk about 10 ft and go "i need to be carried!" and so we would say "no, we are walking now. you can walk too!" and he would go "but it's hard, and i'm just a little baby!" and we would say "you'll get used to it!" and now he'll walk about 4 kms holding hands and not even ask to be carried. it's getting pretty awesome, honestly.

    you do need to get your partner on board. and if your partner is a step-parent, yu need to get the other parent on board as well, at least in part, because otherwise the carb addiction comes right back and you are fighting with the child every few weeks for a bit. your partner also has to be willing/able to tolerate the tantrums, whining, biting, kicking, screaming, freaking-out and other carrying on as the child tries to get her way.

    but yes, she'll likely be healthier.

  10. #10
    zoebird's Avatar
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    and seriously, i'm like the food-will breaker among my friends. they send their "picky" eaters to me for a weekend. some of these "picky eaters" only eat ice cream, chicken nuggets, and gummy bears. and i look at the parents like "what are you, stupid?" fact is, they are afraid of the tantrum. i am not afraid of the tantrum.

    so, these kids come to my house for the weekend, and mom/dad get a break. usually, out of town. we talk about medical needs, emergency contacts, and all of that. and then friday am (i always ask for the kids to have a day off from school), the parents drop the kiddo(s) off at my house. I am making breakfast, and they are tired, hungry, and disoriented (though they know they are coming to our house). I say no food before they arrive *none*. i make breakfast and put it out. invariably, the kid asks for their meal of choice (gummy bears! mommy ALWAYS lets me have gummy bears! you are MEAN!"). the kid doesn't get it. I'm polite, but firm. "this is what we eat for breakfast." and that's that. i say "you are free to eat as much as you want, and you are also free to not eat if you do not want to." this gives the child a choice.

    next, we go out for a nice walk/hike and playground time, it's just fun. i put out a snack. there is water. if the child asks for their favorite snack (ice cream! mommy ALWAYS gives me ice cream!), then i say that we do not eat ice cream, but we have this lovely snack right here. you can eat as much as you want, or you are also free to not eat if you do not want to.

    next, we go on some errands, nd then back home for lunch. same deal. usually, the kid is "starving" and whining by this point. you just have to be able to tolerate it. Also, i know that kids are not as miserable toward 'friends' as they are toward mom. i do get that. but you *can* handle it.

    Typically, Saturday lunch time, the kid is eating whatever is served. I had one hold out until saturday dinner. Typically, if the child is old enough (7 or 8) i have them help prepare the meal with me. this really seems to pique their interest in the food. By Sunday night, they eat whatever is served without complaint, and sometimes with excitement.

    then, it's up to the parents. I tell them "don't give in." i give a meal plan, recipes, whatever (usually, this work is done before, and the parents can start planning the pantry). this now has to be a life without gummy bears. chicken nuggets no longer exist. ice cream is a rare, rare, rare treat. i ask a parent to wait at least 3 months before giving candy or ice cream again. *the parent* giving candy or ice cream. if it's at school -- where a lot of junk is -- then you aren't in control. but when you are, damn well be in control.

    and i'm not a controlling parent, but kids need *boundaries* and parents provide that. i'm usually appalled by what people feed their children. it's unbelievable.

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