Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Advisible to do aerobic exercise with sore muscles? page

  1. #1
    hfox's Avatar
    hfox is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    4

    1

    Primal Fuel


    I've been fairly physically inactive this week and have gotten in virtually no low or high-intensity aerobic exercise. I'm concerned that this is becoming a pattern and that my resting HR is on the rise.


    Yesterday I had a terrific lifting day of deadlifts, bench presses and rows and I'm (happily) feeling it today.


    Is it counterproductive to my muscle-repair to get my HR up by doing bike or treadmill sprints for around 15 hard minutes or to do a mild 35-45 minutes on the elliptical today? At the same token, is it a bad idea to work different body parts on sequential days? (Often my 18-year old brother is interested in doing the latter, but I usually opt against it for fear of hindering my strength gains. I would never lift the next day after a day like yesterday, but would consider it, though, if I did not feel sore or tired).


  2. #2
    Vick's Avatar
    Vick is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    604

    1



    The following is a quote from Pete Sisco. This is the only article I've that relates liver and pancreas performance to overtraining.


    "The “Dirty Little Secret” of Strength Training

    Fixed training schedules are insane. Every fixed training schedule, such as "3-days-per-week", will ultimately fail you. Here’s why. As your strength increases, your workouts become more demanding and you will require more time to recover.


    The average guy sitting in front of a computer has the capacity to increase his muscular strength by 300-400%. However, recovering from physical activity puts demands on many of the body’s organs, such as the liver, kidneys and pancreas, to name but three. These organs do not have the capacity to increase their metabolic functioning by the same 300-400% your muscles can.


    When you think about it, this is something you already know from experience. If you do a light workout it hardly takes anything out of you. Your recovery is swift. But when you do a grueling workout involving heavy weights and high intensity overload, it can take days to feel fully recovered.


    And since the indispensable key to strength training gains is progressive overload, you must find a way to increase the intensity of every workout and allow more time to recover from that workout..."


  3. #3
    hfox's Avatar
    hfox is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    4

    1



    So Vick, you think it's best to avoid aerobic exercise in order to let the body repair itself and to enable the organs time to recover?


    It makes good sense; it's just frustrating to feel as if my aerobic conditioning is kind of going downhill as I get stronger and place greater focus on weight training.


    Thanks a lot for your input.


  4. #4
    Vick's Avatar
    Vick is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    604

    1



    Not to avoid... but keep in limits. What is working for me so far is I've fallen into a pattern of SCT weights once a week.


    I'm then doing a combination of three other evercises a week. A walk, my spartan, 10 minutes on the punching bag or a 30 minute walk with some intermittent sprints. The day after weights is an off day or walking only.


    I'm finding gains in strength, heart and lung capacity.


    Most people here probably think I'm dogging it. I think I see a lot of overtraining. We know training produces toxins. I've not yet to come across any other articles by a trainer that looks at the effort done by the organs to remove the toxins. It makes sense to me however that this could be a clog in the pipeline that has to be respected.


  5. #5
    primal_jessjane's Avatar
    primal_jessjane is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    569

    1



    hfox, why don't you do some light aerobics, like a walk? You know, moving slowly? Go for a bikeride, do some yoga or full body stretching. Get the blood moving.


  6. #6
    primal_jessjane's Avatar
    primal_jessjane is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    569

    1



    Vick, what is spartan?! I've read it everywhere but am unsure of the routine...


  7. #7
    Vick's Avatar
    Vick is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    604

    1



    It is a routine my son modified for me.


    50 hip rotations. (hands on your hips and bend forward, right, back, left is one rotation.)


    25 pushups

    50 crunches

    25 push ups

    50 lunges

    50 squats (fingers touch the floor)

    50 stride jumps.


    time yourself and do it faster everytime. Today I hit a PB of 11 minutes 22 seconds. Once (If) I can get it down under 10 minutes then I graduate from Spartan 300 to Spartan 360. NO kidding... I started at Spartan 60... I was in such poor condition.


  8. #8
    primal_jessjane's Avatar
    primal_jessjane is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    569

    1



    Is a stride jump like a big leap? I think I might try that for my next HIIT workout this week...I believe I'd have to cheat and do most of those push-ups on my knees though, there's no way I could hammer through 50 traditional ones!


  9. #9
    Vick's Avatar
    Vick is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    604

    1



    A stride jump is when the legs go out sideways as your arms go from your side and you touch your fingers above your head.


    As for the push up... that is why it is split into 2 sets of 25.


    Try it and let me know what you think of it.


  10. #10
    primal_jessjane's Avatar
    primal_jessjane is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    569

    1



    So, like an exagerrated jumping jack? You don't repeat this circuit, do you? I guess I'd be "cheating" if I did knee push-ups. My mother told me that she made a bet with herself that she had to be able to do her age in (traditional) push-ups (she laughed when I asked her if she did them on her knees.) Not sure if she could tackle that now at 47, but it's a good goal to get to.


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •