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Thread: Shinsplints be damned!!! page 2

  1. #11
    Stu's Avatar
    Stu
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    Stretch your calves out really good. You need to stretch both the gastroc and the soleus. The soleus does not cross the knee joint, so you hit it by doing a normal calf stretch but then bend your knee and push it towards the ground. The soleus is a common culprit with shin splints as it can get tight and pull on its attachment on the tibia causing pain.

  2. #12
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    I know when i had them i would stretch the calf muscle alot during the day and gradually they were less frequent. Then i stopped stretching completely and i they have never come back. When i am running on a hilly course sometimes i will stop for 30 secs and give them a quick stretch if a feel my calves getting tight. But most days i dont stretch at all and run injury free
    It is not what we take up, but what we give up, that makes us rich.
    ó Henry Ward Beecher

  3. #13
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    Hey guys thanks for the advice! I'm having some trouble with them right now too, and even though they are more annoying than anything else (for me...I've seen people have them so terrible they can barely walk UGH) it's still good to minimize them!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Golf View Post
    I know the obvious answer is the shoes, but in all fairness I've never done just sprints in my conventional shoes or just distance in VFFs so it's hard to make that a clear answer IMO. Was hoping for some guidance from anyone who has "beat" shinsplints. They are the one thing that actually seems to hold me back. HELP!?!?!?!?!
    Check out this book, I think it might help. Certainly helped me. I had knee and Achilles pain:

    http://www.amazon.com/Trigger-Point-.../dp/1572243759

    Best thing is, treatment is free and you can do it wherever, whenever.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Golf View Post
    Was hoping for some guidance from anyone who has "beat" shinsplints. They are the one thing that actually seems to hold me back. HELP!?!?!?!?!
    As I said...I beat shinsplints. Take calcium ascorbate and it goes away.

  6. #16
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    I used to suffer from shin splints when I ran track and here is what has helped me:

    Stretching the front of the shins by doing a "child's pose" (i.e. on your knees with top of foot flat on the floor) then sitting on the heels
    mid foot strike -- this has changed my life, regardless of what shoes I'm wearing
    overall strengthening and balance exercises

    I haven't had shin splints in years.

  7. #17
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    I used to have them pretty bad in high school, too (which was only two years ago for me ).
    I had to wrap my legs every day with a bag of ice+plastic wrap and probably shouldn't have been running through the pain... but I was stubborn and wasn't taking care of myself at all.
    After quitting cross country and gaining some much needed weight, I STILL had both bad shin splints and hip pain whenever I ran for even one mile (so it probably wasn't just an "overdoing it" issue). I started running in vibrams and did more trail running (downhill is especially helpful to strengthen the front of your shins) and now when I flex my feet towards my face I have a pretty big muscle that was pretty much non-existent before.
    I have no more shin pain and the hip pain has only bothered me a few times in the past year. I don't run very much, but even when I do I always surprise myself with how good it feels compared to how I remember it always being.

  8. #18
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    I've heard from others who suffered from shin splints that the Chi Running technique helped. It emphasizes a mid-foot strike with shorter, quicker strides. Good luck with your race

  9. #19
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    shin splints

    I've diagnosed myself with shin splints, well its lower leg pain from just above the ankle to below the knee (inside of leg), I've only started PB this week and am seriously under-fit, however I've been playing 5 a side football (soccer) once a week for a couple of years combined with a bit of walking. I played twice this week and am suffering a lot, so will try some of the tips on here

  10. #20
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    Shinsplints= Periostitis. The Periosteum is the outer connective tissue sheath that covers bones, "itis" means inflammations. It typically becomes inflamed through repetitive microtraumas (poor running technique/heavy heel strike) or when the muscles that attach directly to the tibia (Tibialis Anterior and Posterior) are tight/dysfunctional the pull on the periosteum and that can cause the inflammation as well. Shinsplints can lead to stress fractures then to more complex fractures (fractures are usually because of a degenerative issue) and possible to compartment syndromes (most commonly with intense RMI).

    Treatments: The calcium probably worked in 1 of 2 ways- Calcium is needed for proper muscle contraction so it could have caused the muscles to relax, or if there was damage to the bone itself the extra calcium would be used for repair of any damage.

    Making sure the muscles of the leg are functioning properly and in good health (absent trigger points and not hyper tonic) will reduce the strain and prevent this from happening. RICE, stretch, proper movement technique, and massage are all good. Also, making sure you don't have a postural issue that is causing you to put more fore than necessary through the leg and foot.

    That's about the extent of my knowledge on it.

    BAM, knowledged.

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