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Thread: In an effort to save money...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    In an effort to save money...

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    I'm considering switching from grass fed beef to conventional. I get my meat from Whole Foods. WF's conventional meat is 2/3 pasture raised. My question is, compared to "normal", grain-fed beef you'd find in traditional grocery stores, is the omega ratio of WF's conventional beef better than that of the traditional stores beef? Does that 1/3 of grain feeding make a huge difference? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    metro Portland
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    Of course I'm not answering your question....but why don't you start getting your meat from your farmers' market or a local family-run farm or get in on a cowpool/pigpool? It's much cheaper than Whole Paycheck, higher quality, and you are helping your neighbors.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    What exactly is "two thirds pasture raised"? If they are butchering an 18-month old steer that's been in a feedlot for six months, it is meaningless. In that case, you might as well drive right past Whole Paycheck and go to your local carniceria.

    Gordo

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Denmark
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    Beef contains so little polyunsaturates that it doesn't matter that the ratio of conventionally raised is worse than grass-fed. Saturated fat content, micronutrient content and hormone/antibiotic residue in the meat are the biggest differences.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pandadude View Post
    Saturated fat content, micronutrient content and hormone/antibiotic residue in the meat are the biggest differences.
    Don't forget flavor. Grass-finished rocks. But if I was on a budget, I'd just go for antibiotic-free. There's a limit to how much they can abuse those steers without antibiotics to keep them alive.

    Gordo

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordo View Post
    Don't forget flavor. Grass-finished rocks. But if I was on a budget, I'd just go for antibiotic-free. There's a limit to how much they can abuse those steers without antibiotics to keep them alive.

    Gordo
    This is true. If you have beef that is antibiotic free, they can only "grain finish" which means typically less than 6 weeks of being grain fed.

    I grew up in beef country in Alberta Canada. I have to say, even conventional Alberta beef kicks the crap out of other conventional beef. Maybe because they are mostly range fed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, Earth
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    We were able to buy a grass fed steer from a local farmer and it came to $4.10/lb after al was said/done. We can barely buy grocery store feedlot ground chuck for that, around here, and the farm raised includes, steaks, ribs, marrow bones and all kinds of nicer cuts. All for a quarter more per pound than the cheapest grocery store meats. So I feel like we are saving $$ in addition to eating better. I recommend it if you can find one.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SC
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    I will definitely have to try to find another source for grass fed beef in my small area. I want the benefits, but, good god, the taste was awful. I enjoy deer/venison, but the beef I had was almost unbearable. I probably gave away 10 to 15 lbs. of the 60 I had originally bought.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    29
    I don't think that there's a big difference between 2/3 pasture raised and entirely grain fed if you're looking at omega ratios. I'm assuming that 2/3 pasture raised means that the cows are finished on grain? From what I understand the omega 3/omega 6 ratio changes very quickly when they are fed grains.

    http://www.grass-fed-beef-101.com/de..._fed_beef.html

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Canada
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    Cattle are often pasture raised and hay fed while on pasture for the bulk of their life, then brought in to the barn to "finish". Finishing usually consists of being fed hay, still out on grass, but in addition they are fed corn silage, barley etc. Alberta beef is generally barley finished, which gives it that amazingly rich, white marbling its famous for. Finishing beef on corn gives the meat a deeper, sweeter flavour. My personal favorite is corn finished beef, especially if its been raised "happy". Grain finishing is what puts that extra fat marbling in the meat, which is what improves flavour.

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