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Thread: are peas and green beans okay? page 5

  1. #41
    Relosa's Avatar
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    SerialSinner, alright I understand now. I just have a hard time using the word domestication to express food for paleo eating, especially when people say things like "If a caveman couldn't eat it, then I can't!" and then go off and say how leafy greens are great, but where did they get the leafy greens? A market of some sort, or maybe their own garden. Last I knew Grok didn't shop around and he didn't have a farm. So when people say "If Grok couldn't find it in the wild I wont eat it!" They should really be saying, "If it's high starch/carbs and it raises my insulin too much, then I wont eat it!" Really arguing about what Grok ate or didn't eat is pretty moot. Eating certain vegetables based on how they effect you on the inside is the real thing we should be basing our food off of.


    erik.cisler, I think it was just observation over a long period of time. And probably a lot of the early agricultural plants were root vegetables and leafy greens. Grok would probably migrate from one place to another, stay a night where a majority of food was found and then go on his way. Then after multiple trips of stopping at the same spot a light bulb went off and he decided to stay put and live off of the available food that would regrow. The book Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond goes into this a bit. It's also a great history book that isn't boring.


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    Besides the fact that Grok wouldn't go out and find green beans in the wild, thus making them NOT primal, what else is wrong with them? That question hasn't been answered in this thread. Grok couldn't forage for penicillin either, but I sure as shit would use it if I had to. Kidney, navy, and other starchy beans are high in carbs, green beans are not really. So what is the health issue?


  3. #43
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    Of course beans were wild plants at one time! It appears Grok's descendants on two continents were cultivating the two major categories for thousands of years: "Beans are one of the longest-cultivated plants, broad beans having been grown at least since ancient Egypt, and the common bean for six thousand years in the Americas." WP. Almost every vegetable and grain we eat has some wild precursor.


    Green beans and snow peas are eaten for the pod flesh, so there is very little "bean" in them. I can't imagine why they are getting a bad rap here.


  4. #44
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    LOL! Sausage? Grok didn't even eat a cow! Or an emu.. or deep sea fish.. etc etc


    Though I would love... LOVE to spend my day foraging around the beautiful Pacific Northwest where we have delicious edibles year round, un/fortunately that's just not my lifestyle. I live in the city and raise my family. We have a billion other things to do - like shop for quality food with my husband's paycheck - thanks to the innovation of agricultural technique and the industrial revolution.


    I buy foraged wild edibles and eat the cultivated green leafs(i.e. succulent, juicy greens) and other vegetables from either my garden (which I cultivate) or the farmer's market (who also cultivate).


    I have a few (domesticated) hens for eggs and I purchase grass fed beef, pigs, chickens and lamb (modern domesticated animals) for meat.


    I think we'd have a hard time finding paleolithic creatures to eat.


    I think what Mark might imply by "Did Grok eat it" is: Is it a whole natural food with primal human roots used to feed the human body for optimal function? Is it also delicious? Eat it!


    Grok didn't eat Carrot Walnut Bread from domesticated carrots or English Walnuts either, but I bet he wished he would have! I'm pretty much dying to make some, but my carrots are done for the time being. Come fall crop though... watch out!


    I can't speak for Mark - Wouldn't it be wonderful if he commented? )


  5. #45
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    Relosa, Grok certainly didn't eat potatos. They weren't around then.

    From that font of all knowledge, Wikipedia:


    "Genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species suggest that the potato has a single origin in the area of southern Peru, from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex."


    So potatoes not palo food.


    Alan.


  6. #46
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    So, Alan, have a source for mastodon meat??????


    We've been all over the potato issue just last week. Since no human ate them before maybe 10K years ago, technically not paleo. But humans were surely eating tubers of one kind or another pre-Bering Straits Bridge days.


  7. #47
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    Here in the UK we have wild versions of numerous food crops, and interestingly many of them are maritime species - sea kale, sea beet etc. We also have wild carrots and parsnips and I don't recommend you eat them, the roots are horrendously fibrous, as are the leaves of the former. Kinda makes you realise how starving people must have been to turn to such food sources.


    Personally you will have to prise the green beans out of my cold dead lifeless hands, and I'm fond of peas and mangetouts occasionally.


    I wonder if since they are not yet mature like the hard beans, they haven't had time to build up a full complement of lectins?


    IMNSHO Grok must have evolved the ability to deal with small acute doses of toxins, and in fact other species also have evolved to use some plants' defence chemicals as drugs and medications. Where it goes pear shaped is with long term chronic exposures, such as to Healthy Whole Grains with every meal. There are benefits as well as costs to many food sources.


  8. #48
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    What the hell is a mangetoot? Why don't you people learn to speak English???


  9. #49
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    OTB, "mangetout", another name for snap peas, comes from French but seems perfectly regular in English too. For example, Wikipedia tells us:


    Snap peas (also known as sugarsnap peas or mangetout) are a cultivar group of edible-podded peas that differ from snow peas in that their pods are round as opposed to flat. Snap peas like all other peas are pod fruits.


    As a person for whom English is only his third language, I find that your reaction is a little bit harsh...


    Hasta la vista! ;-)


    Murat


  10. #50
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    @murat, did you not see the smiey face after I dissed the UK speakers of English? Not harsh, an attempt at humor. Or, using a famous quote. "America and Britain. Two nations separated by a common language."


    I assure you "mangetout" is not in regular usage on this side of the Atlantic. Despite being pretty well educated, having been an intensive gardener with a landscaping business once, and of course, an eater of foods, I've never heard of "mangetout."


    So, a reasonable question.


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