Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Emerging research shows that bacteria have powers... page

  1. #1
    Saoirse's Avatar
    Saoirse is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    6,641

    Emerging research shows that bacteria have powers...

    Primal Fuel
    ...to engineer the environment, to communicate and to affect human well-being. They may even think.
    http://www.miller-mccune.com/science...ia-r-us-23628/
    These facts by themselves may trigger existential shock: People are partly made of pond scum. But beyond that psychic trauma, a new and astonishing vista unfolds. In a series of recent findings, researchers describe bacteria that communicate in sophisticated ways, take concerted action, influence human physiology, alter human thinking and work together to bioengineer the environment. These findings may foreshadow new medical procedures that encourage bacterial participation in human health.
    just a small factoid, but particularly interesting to those of us who have had to deal with eczema:
    "Most of these live in the digestive tract, but researchers have also discovered unique populations adapted to the inside of the elbow and the back of the knee. "
    I wonder if that's why UV radiation is supposed to help.

  2. #2
    breadsauce's Avatar
    breadsauce is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,126
    Fascinating article! To be at the mercy of colonies of bacteria for our mood! Eat well and keep your bacteria happy to be happy - amazing!

  3. #3
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    I welcome our microscopic overlords.

  4. #4
    skink531's Avatar
    skink531 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    2,080
    They even allow Darth Vader to choke a guy from across the room. A skill I could use.

  5. #5
    Saoirse's Avatar
    Saoirse is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    6,641
    oh eww...
    Some researchers are even exploring the idea of stool transplants — that is, introducing a healthy person’s gut bacteria into a sick person’s intestines via the donor’s feces.
    The archaean partner makes fermentation of indigestible polysaccharides (which are complex carbohydrates) more efficient, and the extra fermentation products are converted to fat by the intestines. It appears that obese people’s gut microbes are just too good at their jobs.
    i have a gut feeling (haha!) that our diets change our inner landscapes. i think it's likely that a person's dietary choices impact the microbial balances, which impacts the foods they crave AND their metabolism (as well as their ability to fully digest various foods and assimilate nutrients), which helps to perpetuate the poor food choices; sort of like a catch-22.
    Even more intriguingly, there have long been hints that some bacteria, including Bifidobacteria commonly found in yogurt, can improve mood.
    I cannot stand the taste of plain kefir, but i have noticed this effect after drinking it. maybe i should revive the kefir grains in my fridge.

    and for those of us who like to dig in the dirt...
    A common soil microbe, Mycobacterium vaccae, has recently been found to cheer up lab mice in experiments by Christopher Lowry, an integrative physiology professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Lowry and colleagues showed that infection with M. vaccae “alters stress-related emotional behavior” in mice by activating neurons producing serotonin, the neurotransmitter affected by Prozac.
    of course, more serotonin isn't necessarily good. watching television, for example, increases serotonin (though i don't remember if it increases reuptake or synthesis).

    When Parke analyzed 4.7 million-year-old organic sediment in the Mediterranean, he estimated the average time it took for resident microbes to reproduce by cell division at 120,000 years.
    some bacteria, such as Myxococcus xanthus, practice predation in packs, swarming as a group over prey microbes such as E. coli and dissolving their cell walls.
    Last edited by Saoirse; 12-01-2010 at 09:37 PM.

  6. #6
    Grumpycakes's Avatar
    Grumpycakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    3,592
    Hurrah for science, woo.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

  7. #7
    Saoirse's Avatar
    Saoirse is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    6,641
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy Caveman View Post
    Hurrah for science, woo.
    really? is that sarcasm? you don't find this the least bit interesting?

    oo loook! a microbe wiki!
    http://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Taxonomy_Index

  8. #8
    Grumpycakes's Avatar
    Grumpycakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    3,592
    Nah, it wasn't sarcastic. It's good that scientists are re-learning that there's intelligence everywhere.
    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

  9. #9
    Saoirse's Avatar
    Saoirse is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    6,641
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy Caveman View Post
    Nah, it wasn't sarcastic. It's good that scientists are re-learning that there's intelligence everywhere.
    i don't know if it's actual intelligence, but wouldn't that be kind of cool? instead of using my body to support just one other sentient being, i'm a host of BILLIONS! it takes the idea of reincarnation to an entirely different level. in that case, i'll skip on the formadehyde and decompose au naturale. hmm...i have a feeling that decaf coffee wasn't so decaffeinated.

  10. #10
    texas.grok's Avatar
    texas.grok is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Egypt with brief trips to Texas
    Posts
    1,105
    Looks like a great article but only skimmed over it. This one part caught my eye however:

    And if you approach the human body as an ecosystem, some researchers are finding, it may be possible to tune that system and prevent many diseases — from acute infections to chronic debilitating conditions — and even to foster mental health, through bacteria.
    If in fact this is true (and I have thought it was), then what does that say about the effect of the overuse of antibiotics in our country? I wonder if you could draw a curve of the rise of a lot of diseases in the US and if it would match the curve of the increased use of antibiotics?

    Thanks for posting the article, I'll print it out and read it tonight.
    Randal
    AKA: Texas Grok

    Quote Originally Posted by texas.grok View Post
    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
    http://hardcoremind.com/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •