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Thread: Used to be rarr page

  1. #1
    rarrrrr's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    I used to be rarr but I forgot my password and now I am rarrrrr. This also represents how I became more primal in the meantime.


    I live in the land of the rising sun. Also known as rice heaven. Seriously, never tell a soul here that you don't eat rice.


    My typical diet consists of two boiled eggs in the morning with veg juice & fish oil capsule, a big fatty salad for lunch (vegan salad actually: lettuce cucumber tomato olives avocado walnuts and a scoop of hummus) and post workout a slab of raw fish with salad and a couple more eggs. I love fruit but am trying to stay low carb. Fruit is very expensive but so delicious in Japan. It's fairly seasonal too, so you don't get berries year round.


    I work out 5-6 times a week doing weightlifting, cycling, swimming and martial arts. Never normally more than an hour unless on a big bike ride. I am one of the few blonde girls riding a fixie around Tokyo if you ever see me.


    My pet peeve is social eating. I need to network a lot so it's tough. Luckily people in Japan don't eat an awful lot (especially women) but what they do it is nearly always total carby crap.


    Life is good and I love being in ketosis! I'm 22% body fat, 56 kgs and 5'3". I want to lose another 5kgs and lower my BF% to around 18%.


    I'm also a minimalist. Less is more!


  2. #2
    62shelby's Avatar
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    you ride fixed! cool. was at the velodrome on the weekend on my track bike. have a town fixie as well! do you ever go out to the track to watch the races? I hear its a big betting sport in Japan.


  3. #3
    Grumpycakes's Avatar
    Grumpycakes is offline Senior Member
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    You may need to take a minimalist approach to your workouts, as well, if you want to lose body fat. Some people find that exercising more than about three times a week stalls their fat loss.

    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

  4. #4
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
    OnTheBayou is offline Senior Member
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    Why would you want 18% BF? That's guy's territory, albeit on the pudger side. It's often where women stop menstruating.


    Why?


    And a PS on passwords. Everyone should have a universal password that is used for sites that don't need to be very secure. I've used the first two letters of my three daughter's names for 13 years and have never had a security problem. I never forget it!


  5. #5
    my_second's Avatar
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    Somebody who actually lives in Japan! Rarrr, could you please tell us how it really is over there?


    How much rice do the japanese people really eat during meals? Do they eat them in every meal? Do they eat much tofu or other soy products? How about their consumption of veggies? How much? How about meat? And just based on your observation, are they mostly skinny fat, or are they really fit? Is metabolic disease prevalent among them?


    I know that's a LOT of questions, but I wanted to know straight from the horse's mouth.


    Thanks,

    MySecond


    p.s. I agree with OTB; use one set of username/password for each type of sites (secure, non-secure, entertainment, etc)


  6. #6
    DaveFish's Avatar
    DaveFish is offline Junior Member
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    I'm also interested in reading Rarr's observations to my_second's questions.


    I've traveled to Japan several times on business and I was surprised how little rice was served with each meal. In some places it wasn't served at all. Bean curd was pretty prevalent and lots of seafood (in Tokyo anyway). Veggies were available with every meal.


    I wouldn't classify the typical Japanese as really fit. Obesity is pretty rare especially compared to in the US and most Japanese have probably never heard of metabolic disease. The Japanese smoke like fiends though and the air in Tokyo isn't the cleanest (but better than most Asian cities) so I'd say those two things probably contribute more to their health problems than their diet.


    Food portions in restaurants are much smaller than in the US but the quality of the food is much better.


  7. #7
    rarrrrr's Avatar
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    My_second, to answer your questions:


    Most people here would not dream of giving up rice in their diet. It's eaten with most meals. Normally about two or three scoopfuls served in a rice bowl. It serves as the base for many japanese meals and japanese versions of western meals. Noodles are also big here too (soba, udon, ramen). Brown rice is generally seen as inferior and not really available in restaurants. Tofu and soy are eaten regularly, usually alongside meat dishes, not as a meat-substitute. I'd disagree with DaveFish's comments about vegetables. I generally find that they're cooked in some sweet sauce or doused in mayo. To me, if you soak a carrot in sugar syrup it no longer counts as a veggie.


    That is not to say there aren't primal alternatives. Three great restaurant options are yaki-niku (grilled meats & veg you cook yourself at the table), yaki-tori (skewers of grilled meat) and izakaya (small portions of various meats, fish, salads).


    If you shop in the supermarket it's perfectly possible to pick up some nice salads and a good slab of a wide variety of fish and seafood. All convenience stores sell salads too (and delicious hard boiled eggs) with calorie info printed on all items. Everything's relatively expensive though.


    From hanging out in the ladies room at the gym, I'd say most people are not fat but they aren't super lean either. There's a lot of pressure here for women to stay thin and too much muscle on a lady is not deemed attractive. meh.


  8. #8
    grandma's Avatar
    grandma is offline Member
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    there is a "lost password" button it resets it and sends you an email. But OK, welcome back.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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