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  1. #1
    nutritionut's Avatar
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    Protein Digestion

    I was raised vegetarian, and systemic Candida has led me towards a high veg/fat/protein diet. I have had some good experiences with eating turkey (no hormones/antibiotics), but I have also had some bad experiences. Candida makes my ability to digest food unpredictable. I also am still getting over the "ick" factor from years of pro-vegetarian surroundings.

    Right now, the main protein I am getting comes from eggs (4 a day) and soaked almonds. I know I need more. I was thinking of an egg white protein supplement. Does any one have any suggestions?

    But I also suspect that I have a protease deficiency in spite of my taking enzymes with meals.

    Does any one have advice on easy to digest protein supplementation and ways to increase my body's ability to process protein? I'm thinking of going on a high protease supplementation protocol.

    Thoughts about what I could be missing would be much appreciated.

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    I'm certainly not an expert in restoring protein digestion and which supplementary enzymes to take, but it seems to me that if your sensibilities can stand it, soup stock from slow cooking a bony joint of lamb or beef in a crock pot, seasoned with some herbs and a little sea salt, maybe with some pepper sauce like green tabasco or a pinch of curry might be quite digestible.

    If the physical nature of a bony joint puts you off, is there someone else who could set it up and cook it for you, so you'd just see the warm stock, maybe with some veggies and parsley in it? A dash of lemon juice or tomato paste would be good, too. The gel from slow cooking a joint is really good for you, especially the digestive system. (Glutamine, it feeds and heals the gut.)

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    Thank you for the advice: I have read about the powers of bone broth on Weston A Price. I have been taking glutamine every day for many months now; I know it helps. Do I just go to a butcher for the bone (clueless vegetarian here)? Would unflavored gelatin help?

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    Yes, you can just ask the butcher for bones for stock. If you mention being a former vegetarian you'll probably get a sympathetic reception and some helpful advice . Gelatin isn't a hugely useful protein on its own afaik, though seeing your homemade stock set is very satisfying!

    Suggestions for increased protein without digestive issues... (not that I'm an expert either)

    - variety (because you don't want to develop an intolerance to eggs)
    - white fish (minimal post-vegetarian ick-factor, high protein and other good stuff, has the reputation of being easy to digest)
    - you could experiment with pre-preparing your meats with the protein-digesting fruits, pineapple (fresh, not tinned) or papaya. They certainly really break down and soften the meat; I don't know what effect this has on digestibility, but it can't hurt.

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    I second the stock and fish suggestions.

    Also, Robb Wolf's book notes that coconut helps heal the gut. Perhaps adding copious amounts of coconut oil to your veggies/meat would be worth a try.

    Have you tried Robb's protocol regarding digestive enzymes? That is, taking enough to feel the "warm" sensation below your sternum, then cutting back by one capsule? (He recommends the Now Foods Superenzymes.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarbeyGirl View Post
    Also, Robb Wolf's book notes that coconut helps heal the gut. Perhaps adding copious amounts of coconut oil to your veggies/meat would be worth a try.
    ...increasing gradually up to 'copious'. Coconut is wonderful stuff, but many people seem to need to adapt to it gradually.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hilary View Post
    ...increasing gradually up to 'copious'. Coconut is wonderful stuff, but many people seem to need to adapt to it gradually.
    LOL Excellent point! I hear that adding too much coconut, too fast, can lead to...er...colonic urgency.
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    Thank you for the advice Hilary and BarbeyGirl. I am looking for butchers in my area today, and I will be sure to play the "clueless vegetarian card."

    The idea of developing an egg intolerance is scary though! I definitely don't want that.

    I have never tried taking enzymes until you get that "warm" feeling; I do that with Hcl 30-45 minutes after a meal, and I take enzymes with my meals.

    I do have a big tub of Nutiva coconut oil. I had been avoiding it for a while, but I think I will slowly start to consume more of it in about a week or so: I am taking a course of Florastor (s. boulardii), and I do not want even the mildest of antifungal effects canceling it out since it is a yeast (that acts like a probiotic).

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