Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: PB, SS, CC, neither, all or what? page

  1. #1
    flipper's Avatar
    flipper is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    13

    PB, SS, CC, neither, all or what?

    Shop Now
    1rst-post person here ... I'm a little confused. Firstly, I read about 20 pages worth of threads and it seems like (almost) no one who posts here is actually doing the PB program as outlined in Mark's pdf, which is fine, of course, but it makes it difficult for a beginner to figure out if, in fact, PB is the way to go or not. And then there's simplefit and convict conditioning, and all of a sudden I'm just left scratching my head.

    Anyway, perhaps I could get a little advice. I'm 56 yrs old, weigh 175 lbs, am flabby and skinny with a nicely developed paunch. I did the PB self-assessment test (mostly), with these results: plank, 1 min; squat, 43; pull up, 6 (could have done more but grip gave out); and pushup, 5 (!!!). So, I seem to be weak and imbalanced.

    That being the case, how do you think I might best progress -- i.e., with which program, PB, SS or CC, neither, some variation of all, or what?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    batty's Avatar
    batty is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    cleveland, ohio
    Posts
    2,443
    i can think of at least 5-6 people who do practice the PBF. check out the journals if you haven't yet.

    the best program for you is the one that keeps you motivated and sticking to the program, tbh. why not try a few weeks of each of them and see which one you like better? mark never said you HAVE to do PBF as a program to be primal. the rules are:

    1. lots of slow movement [ie walking]
    2. lifting heavy things
    3. the occasional full out sprint.

    how you choose to do these things is up to you.


    HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

  3. #3
    primalrob's Avatar
    primalrob is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manchester, NH
    Posts
    2,142
    i've been following simplefit for months, and i think it's a great program for beginners. it's easy to follow, and can be changed up pretty easily (i.e. switching which days you do which workout, adding exercises, etc.). mark's pbf program covers a little more area since it has the overhead press and plank...so i sort of combine the two. i agree with the advice to try them all out, and see what works best for you.

  4. #4
    flipper's Avatar
    flipper is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    13
    Thanks for replying! I have checked out some of the journals but I haven't had the luck to land on one that is all PBF from the get go. If you know of one in particular, especially one from a beginner like me, perhaps you could link to it.

    Meanwhile, I get the slow movement thing and the all-out sprint thing. It's setting up a doable success-likely program for Lifting Heavy Things that has me a little flummoxed. All things being equal, if you were going to start out with one, which one would you start out on? Or would it make just as much sense to toss a dart at the trio and begin with whichever one it hits?

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    arthurb999's Avatar
    arthurb999 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    RI, USA
    Posts
    1,034
    I think the PB ebook is a great place to start. Once you build up a decent strength base, you can decide if you want to continue (adding a weight vest or increaseing leverage) or maybe start working with weights, sandbags, etc.

    They are all just means to an end... no one way of training is "better".

  6. #6
    iniQuity's Avatar
    iniQuity is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    5,683
    experiment experiment experiment.

    I've been all over the place. I'm still tweaking, adding, subtracting. All plans are just guidelines, just because you're doing the PBF doesn't mean you can't do something outside of that, inversely, just because you're NOT doing the PBF doesn't mean you can't borrow from it.

    The PBF is a GREAT place not just to start but to get real strong, you will get out of it as much as you put in it. Goes for anything in life.

  7. #7
    elwyne's Avatar
    elwyne is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    487
    I do PBF because it is SIMPLE, requires minimal equipment (pull up bar only), and is all laid out in the e-book. And if you can do the basic moves as outlined, you're in a good place. If PBF doesn't cut it for you - too easy, too boring, not motivating enough - try one of the others suggested.

    I'm in a weird place right now due to a shoulder injury. I had been working on my upper body exclusively, since my legs are already pretty strong; now I can't do that so much so I've been seeing what I can do with my legs. Since I can squat for days I had to branch out & go looking for tougher stuff. Personally I like Al Kavadlo's blog; great attitude, breaks down the moves from super-basic all the way to superman. Working on the pistol squat now!

  8. #8
    batty's Avatar
    batty is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    cleveland, ohio
    Posts
    2,443
    Quote Originally Posted by flipper View Post
    Thanks for replying! I have checked out some of the journals but I haven't had the luck to land on one that is all PBF from the get go. If you know of one in particular, especially one from a beginner like me, perhaps you could link to it.

    Meanwhile, I get the slow movement thing and the all-out sprint thing. It's setting up a doable success-likely program for Lifting Heavy Things that has me a little flummoxed. All things being equal, if you were going to start out with one, which one would you start out on? Or would it make just as much sense to toss a dart at the trio and begin with whichever one it hits?

    Thanks!
    just the first one off the top of my head: ms. boner does PBF and shovelglove, i believe.

    i've been lifting heavy for over a year now, and i dont think i've done a program for more than 2 months at a stretch. switching it up can be beneficial, too - as long as you dont end up working out the same muscle groups over and over again. but i agree with arthurb, no matter the approach, we're all shooting for the same results. so, yeah, pull out that dart if you feel like it


    HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

  9. #9
    tfarny's Avatar
    tfarny is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    3,478
    I think that lots of people on here are having success doing various programs, or their own interpretations of them. You didn't mention crossfit or a barbell program, so I'm assuming you are going the bodyweights direction. What I think the variety of succesful programs demonstrates is that there are multiple means to the same ends, and any program will be effective if you commit to it, if it motivates you, etc., That's the first priority.
    Note: 6 proper pullups, but only 5 pushups? That is extremely unusual. I was doing maybe 25 pushups before I ever got my first proper pullup.

  10. #10
    primalrob's Avatar
    primalrob is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Manchester, NH
    Posts
    2,142
    Quote Originally Posted by tfarny View Post
    Note: 6 proper pullups, but only 5 pushups? That is extremely unusual. I was doing maybe 25 pushups before I ever got my first proper pullup.
    agreed. that seems odd. my push-up to pull-up ratio has always been at least 4-5 : 1

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •