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Thread: Bok Choy and Glucosinolates? page

  1. #1
    TheFastCat's Avatar
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    Bok Choy and Glucosinolates?

    Primal Fuel
    So here I was all proud of eating Bok Choy for lunch here at work regularly when I stumble upon the wikipedia article as I am patting myself on my back

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bok_choy

    "Bok choy contains glucosinolates. These compounds have been reported to prevent cancer in small doses, but are toxic to humans in large doses. In 2009, an elderly woman who had been consuming 1 to 1.5 kg of raw bok choy per day developed hypothyroidism, resulting in myxedema coma.[3]"

    the pink elephant in the corner being that this sounds a lot worse than a gluten-filled english muffin and the irony being that I am eating lots of veg to stave off thyroid related disease.

    anyone have further insight into Glucosinolates? Should I stop eating so much Bok Choy?
    Last edited by TheFastCat; 11-15-2010 at 12:45 PM.

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    mhoward's Avatar
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    I think if you cook the bok choy, then those chemicals are reduced. The woman who went into the coma was eating RAW vegetables, and piles of them.

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    AndreaReina's Avatar
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    From [url=http://www.marksdailyapple.com/iodine-deficiency/]Mark's iodine post[/i]:
    Those who eat a lot of raw broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts, bok choy, collard greens, mustard greens, Chinese broccoli/cabbage, radishes, rutabagas, turnips, rapini, kale, millet, soy, cassava, spinach, pine nuts, pears, peaches, sweet potatoes, peanuts, or bamboo shoots should supplement with iodine or consider swapping in some sea vegetables. The aforementioned are all sources of goitrogens, which, when eaten raw, prevent iodine uptake by the thyroid gland. Cooking takes care of most of the problem, but variety is always good.
    Lots of stuff on that list, but basically if you cook it you should be ok. Get more iodine (seafood, sea vegetables) just in case.

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