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    Sonnenblume's Avatar
    Sonnenblume is offline Senior Member
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    fat-reduced almond flour better?

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    I wonder if I can avoid the Omega 6 problem with almond products using fat-reduced almond flour. In general, I am with eyeryone else here in only using whole fat products but with almond flour I prefer the fat-reduced variant for it is much easier to bake and cook with it as it gives a much better texture and is much more firm when baked. So I wonder if it is healthier as well: My flour has 12 g of fat/100 g. As, from what I know, almonds contain much more monosunaturated fatty acids anyway. The Omega 6 part seems neglectable, considering that one serving of baked good may not contain more than 20-30 g of almond flour? Any ideas about that?
    Thank you very much!

  2. #2
    IcarianVX's Avatar
    IcarianVX is offline Senior Member
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    Where did you find fat reduced almond flour?
    The omega 6 problem is no problem at all with regular almond flour - there are hardly any PUFA in almond flour.

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    Sonnenblume's Avatar
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    I use to order my almond flour from "Ölmühle Solling" - it is a German brand. I think is can be baked much better than the full-fat meal. I am glad that you confirmed my finding that almond flour has hardly any PUFA!

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    Annika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IcarianVX View Post
    The omega 6 problem is no problem at all with regular almond flour - there are hardly any PUFA in almond flour.
    Dr Kurt Harris would disagree with you. Here he is discussing almond flour pancakes:
    Almonds are about 17% PUFA, nearly all n-6 linoleic acid, probably well-oxidized after frying in a skillet hot enough to give the “pancake” that golden hue we all like.
    From http://www.paleonu.com/panu-weblog/2...igarettes.html
    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
    On Twitter: @NEKLocalvore

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