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Thread: Many diets later... page 2

  1. #11
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  2. #12
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    I agree with Dollface. Most days, it's routine just to boil some eggs, cook bacon or slap a steak on the grill with just salt and pepper, otherwise, I look at it as a new cooking challenge! Sooooo many new wonderful opportunities to mix in the unexpected for a whole new flavor explosion!


    No need for 'limitations' or 'can't haves', but for 'new opportunities'! :-)


  3. #13
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    I was cleaning out some cupboard the other day and I pulled out a pack of Cheeto's. I looked, I thought, I thought of how nasty-tasty they are.......and I dropped it into the bag headed for the food bank.


  4. #14
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    The way I started this journey was to think about food in the traditional sense. Food was raised and grown and then cooked at home using old world recipes. You can start that way. Above you talked about some wonderful traditional foods that you are making in your own kitchen, then you talked about a factory produced junk food. Keep the traditional foods and dump the factory food. Take a few simple steps that don't require any deprivation, just a change in ingredients.


    1. no seed oil

    2. shop for ingredients not products

    3. dump sugary drinks

    4. drop as much sugar as you can.

    5. stop eating sandwiches, a Dagwood in a bowl is just as good

    6. eat grass-fed meat

    7. don't be afraid of eggs

    8. don't be afraid of fat, butter is good. Add it to whatever starchy foods you eat, that's what our ancestors did.


    after you do this for a while and you learn more here, you will stop the poisons and won't miss them a bit. The we hope you experiment and share your recipes with us because we love to cook and eat too.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  5. #15
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    BTW, that's what I planned to do; but when I read more about how bad wheat was for you, I just dropped it and most grains. It was Dr. Davis that pushed me over the edge

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  6. #16
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    Me again. I just followed your link to your website. Looks like you are already doing some of the things that I suggested in your cooking, so your challenge is to adjust to more primal and lower carb.


    You paintings are amazing. I love them! I have a feeling, you can do this. You need to find some inspiration from the traditions you clearly enjoy. I have a feeling you are going to be the one who has a primal restaurant!

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  7. #17
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    I think it's Jack Lallane (I know that's misspelled), still kicking and athletic, who said, "If man made it, hate it." A good philosophy, but would eliminate something like coconut milk.


    But hewing in that direction is excellent advice.


  8. #18
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    Start thinking about what you can have. In my previous CW life I was a vegan. Low-fat was my lifestyle. Despite the low-fat, I was the one putting on the fat. I'm 5'8" and currently weigh 206lbs (93kg), but I was 230 (103kg) about a year ago, and I decided then that ten years of low-fat veganry wasn't working. I put it on slowly, about 10-15lbs a year, so I really didn't notice it creeping up.


    But when things had to change, all those previously off-limit foods were now available to me. Coconut, especially. I could drink the milk, the oil, eat it right out of the pod. I could have cheese, avocadoes, whole milk, salmon, nuts and nut butters, eggs, bacon, meats, steak, butter and so on.


    It was also helpful to me to get rid of everything in my house that was tempting for me. Snacks or even bad ingredients. Now, I have two jars of my home roasted nuts that I use for snacking if hunger hits me and I'm still making a long cooking meal.


    I don't even think about wheat, pasta or most grains anymore. I do miss a warm bowl of oat porridge, but I'll save that for the times when I'm at family's house (mostly vegans in my family) and they have no primal food. I do miss ice cream, but I like to make a frozen coco cream with stevia for dessert. It hits the spot.


  9. #19
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    OTB, I'm not sure if Mark has a quip like that, but I would think that if grok could have made it then it is OK. And before you say anything, I have personally seen coconut milk made with primitive tools. It went like this:


    Piece of bamboo shoved in the sand is used first to remove the husk. Then a stone is used to open it. Then the point of the bamboo is used to grate the coconut meat into the coconut husks. Then the bundle of husk and meat is gathered and twisted and voila coconut milk.

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  10. #20
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    http://www.shesimmers.com/2009/01/coconut-rabbit-thai-coconut-grater.html


    This is the kind of tradition a primal can love: "That's why a flimsy hand grater is not going to do the job;*you need the heavy duty rabbit which requires you to actually sit on it, thereby holding the contraption down with your body weight while you grate away in quick, short strokes to create miniscule flakes as opposed to long, coarse strands. It's a full body exercise."

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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