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Thread: Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes page

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    Jenny's Avatar
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    Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes

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    I've been having fun cruising for articles. Thought you'd like this one:

    Full text is here: http://www.cardiab.com/content/8/1/35
    Here's the abstract and summary:

    Beneficial effects of a Paleolithic diet on cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes: a randomized cross-over pilot study
    Tommy Jönsson1 , Yvonne Granfeldt2 , Bo Ahrén1 , Ulla-Carin Branell3 , Gunvor Pålsson2 , Anita Hansson2 , Margareta Söderström4 and Staffan Lindeberg1

    Cardiovascular Diabetology 2009, 8:35doi:10.1186/1475-2840-8-35

    Published: 16 July 2009

    Abstract
    Background
    Our aim was to compare the effects of a Paleolithic ('Old Stone Age') diet and a diabetes diet as generally recommended on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin.

    Methods
    In a randomized cross-over study, 13 patients with type 2 diabetes, 3 women and 10 men, were instructed to eat a Paleolithic diet based on lean meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, root vegetables, eggs and nuts; and a Diabetes diet designed in accordance with dietary guidelines during two consecutive 3-month periods. Outcome variables included changes in weight, waist circumference, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and areas under the curve for plasma glucose and plasma insulin in the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary intake was evaluated by use of 4-day weighed food records.

    Results
    Study participants had on average a diabetes duration of 9 years, a mean HbA1c of 6,6% units by Mono-S standard and were usually treated with metformin alone (3 subjects) or metformin in combination with a sulfonylurea (3 subjects) or a thiazolidinedione (3 subjects). Mean average dose of metformin was 1031 mg per day. Compared to the diabetes diet, the Paleolithic diet resulted in lower mean values of HbA1c (-0.4% units, p = 0.01), triacylglycerol (-0.4 mmol/L, p = 0.003), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg, p = 0.03), weight (-3 kg, p = 0.01), BMI (-1 kg/m2, p = 0.04) and waist circumference (-4 cm, p = 0.02), and higher mean values of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+0.08 mmol/L, p = 0.03). The Paleolithic diet was mainly lower in cereals and dairy products, and higher in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs, as compared with the Diabetes diet. Further, the Paleolithic diet was lower in total energy, energy density, carbohydrate, dietary glycemic load, saturated fatty acids and calcium, and higher in unsaturated fatty acids, dietary cholesterol and several vitamins. Dietary GI was slightly lower in the Paleolithic diet (GI = 50) than in the Diabetic diet (GI = 55).

    Conclusion
    Over a 3-month study period, a Paleolithic diet improved glycemic control and several cardiovascular risk factors compared to a Diabetes diet in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. #2
    primalmaven's Avatar
    primalmaven is offline Junior Member
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    Cool is all I can say!!!

    Thanks Jenny.

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    Jenny's Avatar
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    The way I figure it... if it's good for diabetics, it's good for me! Particularly since diabetes runs in my family... but I also feel confident that blood sugar control is good for everybody.
    Last edited by Jenny; 11-01-2010 at 02:45 PM.

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    Thanks!

    Maybe they should consider renaming the 'diabetes diet'?

    One puzzling part - the 'paleolithic' diet had lower sat fat and higher unsaturated? Wonder how they managed that... lots of nuts, perhaps?

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    Makes me glad I found Primal/Paleo lifestyle when I did. My dad was diabetic and died from complications from it. I hadn't become diabetic, but with the amount of fat I had put on and my eating habits it was only a matyer of time. I had kind of accepted the fact it was going to happen. Either that or I would have a heart attack(dad had 2 of). It is a crime diabetics aren't given this information. It should be required reading. No one has to accept diabetes as an unavoidable fact of life. Thanks to this way of life I'm 60 lbs of fat lighter and have added quite a bit of muscle. I'm healthier now than when I was in my 20's. And to think a year ago I had pretty much accepted an early death.

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    Jenny's Avatar
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    No idea, Hilary, maybe it's a different take (Cordain version with different oils?) or something...

    Skink, I'm happy for you! 60 pounds, that's awesome (and more than 60 of fat, from what you're describing.)

    My dad's diabetic (with heart failure) and just the other day I accidentally blabbed to my mom that I'm trying to cut back on grains, and she countered immediately with "But you have to eat at least some whole grains!" I gave her the "What do they offer me nutritionally that I can't get more efficiently from salad?" response, but... I feel like I mustn't outright argue with the weight of CW in that house. Thankfully he's been doing really well, but that just makes it less likely to sink in even if I did... I waffle severely.

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