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Thread: Kefir and sugar page

  1. #1
    leonardotmnt's Avatar
    leonardotmnt is offline Senior Member
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    Kefir and sugar

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    I got goat's milk kefir the other day and I'm starting to like it. I originally got it for the probiotics but then started to like the taste more and more. I do have a question about sugar content, however. On the nutritional label it says it has 11 g sugar per cup. I was under the impression that the bacteria ate the sugar and produced a byproduct with it. Does the sugar on the label just reflect what it started with or is that how much sugar is in a cup now after it's fermented? I wasn't sure if it was still fairly sugar laden or what the deal was. Thanks.

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    NourishedEm's Avatar
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    I've wondered at this too, I believe that they have to list what they put in to the bottle to start with. The kefir eats up the sugar to produce the lactic acid and other wonderful goodies that are in the final product. It doesn't taste sweet does it? If not, I'd say you're fairly safe

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    Commercial Kefir is a bit different from homebrewed. Once the commercial Kefir is made, then it's pasturized which means all of the good cultures are killed. Then, a few (up to as many as 10) are added back in, sugar is added so the taste isn't so sour, along with whatever flavorings might be desired. If you like the taste of Kefir, and don't mind a bit of daily work, you can get the Kefir grains and brew your own. It's a lot cheaper brewing your own than buying from the store!

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    leonardotmnt's Avatar
    leonardotmnt is offline Senior Member
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    Just curious but are they using raw milk to make the kefir with then? If they aren't using raw milk why would they need to pasteurize again after it fermented?

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    loneviking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leonardotmnt View Post
    Just curious but are they using raw milk to make the kefir with then? If they aren't using raw milk why would they need to pasteurize again after it fermented?
    Sometimes yes, sometimes no. From what I've read, the FDA requires the pasturization after the fermention to ensure that only specific strains of bacteria and yeast are present. With Kefir, you can have up to 50 strains but what those strains are vary depending on the grains; the type of milk; the enviroment it's cultured in, to name just a few variables. The FDA doesn't like unknowns, so they require pasturization and then specific strains are put back into the Kefir and those strains are on the label.

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    tamo42's Avatar
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    From what I've read, the kefir grains digest the glucose and leave the fructose. Not the best result, but may be outweighed by its benefits.

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    loneviking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamo42 View Post
    From what I've read, the kefir grains digest the glucose and leave the fructose. Not the best result, but may be outweighed by its benefits.
    No---milk Kefir grains digest and use lactose, breaking it down into lactase which is digestible.

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    tamo42's Avatar
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    Ah, that's right. I was thinking of water kefir grains that are fed table sugar.

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