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  1. #21
    Shrinking_Violet's Avatar
    Shrinking_Violet is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obsidian View Post
    Wow...smart... why didn't i think of that?! haha.... unfortunately, i showed my parents the book (I just got it yesterday! and I'm so excited to read into it ) and they said that the book was an unreliable source just because Mark Sission didn't have the letters Ph.D or MD, etc after his name. My parents told me that I should listen to the food pyramid, the American Heart Association, the USDA, etc. So now I'm confused....
    No, it's your parents who're confused. I had a nutritionist like that once - grains were the cure for all humankind's ill, dontcha, know...? I was constipated (due to IBS) her solution...? Eat more grains. I was an insomniac - why? Because I wasn't eating enough grains.

    I'd discovered Primalism by the time I'd got round to seeing her - and I SWEAR she had shares in Kellogg's, Nestle, Warburtons, Hovis, McVities and Kingsmill the way she kept banging on about it!

    So I humoured her for a bit (about a fortnight). I followed her 'healthy' eating plan. My IBS got worse. Apparently that was because I wasn't eating the right KINDS of grains! So I quit and, in less than a week, my IBS was at least 90% improved; I sent her an email, telling her I'd quit her diet and my IBS was nearly 100% 'cured'. She didn't believe me. I also put the willies up her by telling her I was no longer eating every 3-4 hours as she told me I must ("your metabolism will slow down and you'll go into starvation mode and you'll gain weight" - which we all know is complete bull!)

    I rather enjoyed telling her stuff like that because the look on her face when I aimed a wrecking ball at the very foundations of everything she'd ever learnt about nutrition.

    Hey! That's just given me an idea - wonder if I could train to become a 'proper' dietitian/nutritionist, one who teaches folk about the REAL way to a healthy life...? Problem with that is they'd probably not believe me. Still, I could give them an 'approved reading list' - with Taubes and Sisson on it! I'm wading through Taubes's Diet Delusion at the moment - and brother that's a tome and a half!
    La tristesse durera toujours...

  2. #22
    Jenny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shrinking_Violet View Post
    I was constipated (due to IBS) her solution...? Eat more grains.
    Ugggh, lovely. Seems like there are some people with IBS who do better with more whole grains and some do better without them. Even my CW doctor told me that... clearly she's never heard of the latter group!

    And I suspect that the former group would do better getting their fiber from other vegetable and berry and nut sources than from grains, anyway... I mean, almonds and strawberries have 3x the fiber of oatmeal...

  3. #23
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    What kind of doctors are your parents?

    Personally, I would go with the least confrontational ways possible. I think, if you don't already, you should start offering to cook. Don't try to prove your parents wrong, they are doing what doctors and nutritionist have said to do for years. Instead, make changes that aren't so in your face that it comes across as blatant rebellion.

    Some ideas for conversation starters:

    "Mom, Dad can I make dinner on Tuesday? I plan on making salmon, a salad and broccoli? Can you help me get everything I need?"
    "Mom, Dad, can you show me how to pick out good steak at the grocery store? I want to know what to look for when you shop for red meat." "Can you teach me how to use the grill?"
    "How do you know what to look for when you pick out cucumbers (or any other fruits and veggies)?
    "Can I go to the store with you?"
    "Can I try this greek yogurt over the yoplait? It has fewer ingredients in it, and that sounds like it might be better for us."
    "I'm going to put mini carrots on the shopping list, do you need me to add anything else?"
    "Can we buy sweet potatoes instead of russets for dinner? I heard they have more vitamins in them."
    "Can we try sourdough bread instead of white bread?"
    "Can we try quinoa instead of bread stuffing?"

    There are ways to cut back on grains and other non-primal foods. Ways to pick healthier options. Change the dialog to not be about them forcing you to eat grains, but about showing you the basics in food preparation. Heck, even if they still insist on grains, you'll learn some valuable information that will suit you well in life. Cooking, choosing foods, reading ingredients all things that you need to learn and practice.

  4. #24
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    Well, even if Mark doesn't have the fancy Ph.D., a lot of his references do. Scientific studies in peer reviewed journals, etc. That ought to get them thinking at least...

  5. #25
    gottaluvalab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BethanyK View Post
    What kind of doctors are your parents?

    Personally, I would go with the least confrontational ways possible. I think, if you don't already, you should start offering to cook. Don't try to prove your parents wrong, they are doing what doctors and nutritionist have said to do for years. Instead, make changes that aren't so in your face that it comes across as blatant rebellion.

    Some ideas for conversation starters:

    "Mom, Dad can I make dinner on Tuesday? I plan on making salmon, a salad and broccoli? Can you help me get everything I need?"
    "Mom, Dad, can you show me how to pick out good steak at the grocery store? I want to know what to look for when you shop for red meat." "Can you teach me how to use the grill?"
    "How do you know what to look for when you pick out cucumbers (or any other fruits and veggies)?
    "Can I go to the store with you?"
    "Can I try this greek yogurt over the yoplait? It has fewer ingredients in it, and that sounds like it might be better for us."
    "I'm going to put mini carrots on the shopping list, do you need me to add anything else?"
    "Can we buy sweet potatoes instead of russets for dinner? I heard they have more vitamins in them."
    "Can we try sourdough bread instead of white bread?"
    "Can we try quinoa instead of bread stuffing?"

    There are ways to cut back on grains and other non-primal foods. Ways to pick healthier options. Change the dialog to not be about them forcing you to eat grains, but about showing you the basics in food preparation. Heck, even if they still insist on grains, you'll learn some valuable information that will suit you well in life. Cooking, choosing foods, reading ingredients all things that you need to learn and practice.
    This sounds like the way to go.

    I don't have children--but I do work with teenagers (and their parents) every day. I would accentuate the positive and eliminate (or avoid) the negative.

    "I know you made spaghetti, but can I have a salad?" What parent is going to argue with THAT?

    Unless they "know what you are up to" now.

    So make a promise, and fulfill it.

    "I know you're worried about fiber--but I'm eating a salad. I listened to you, and I've really thought about fiber. There's, like 8 grams here, which is way more than in the pasta. I promise I'll make sure to get fiber."

    "I know you're worried about my getting enough carbohydrates. But I listened to you and thought about it. I made sure to eat three servings of fruit. I promise I won't starve myself of carbohydrates."

    I think if you say, "I'm trying to eat good, whole foods. I promise I won't get crazy on you," and then follow through, you'll be fine.

    But if you're living off of jerky, burgers without a bun, diet sodas, and cheese sticks...

    well, you might have a problem with the 'rents.

    (Do you youngsters still say 'rents? Seriously--I need to know--work related!)

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BethanyK View Post
    What kind of doctors are your parents?

    Personally, I would go with the least confrontational ways possible. I think, if you don't already, you should start offering to cook. Don't try to prove your parents wrong, they are doing what doctors and nutritionist have said to do for years. Instead, make changes that aren't so in your face that it comes across as blatant rebellion.

    Some ideas for conversation starters:

    "Mom, Dad can I make dinner on Tuesday? I plan on making salmon, a salad and broccoli? Can you help me get everything I need?"
    "Mom, Dad, can you show me how to pick out good steak at the grocery store? I want to know what to look for when you shop for red meat." "Can you teach me how to use the grill?"
    "How do you know what to look for when you pick out cucumbers (or any other fruits and veggies)?
    "Can I go to the store with you?"
    "Can I try this greek yogurt over the yoplait? It has fewer ingredients in it, and that sounds like it might be better for us."
    "I'm going to put mini carrots on the shopping list, do you need me to add anything else?"
    "Can we buy sweet potatoes instead of russets for dinner? I heard they have more vitamins in them."
    "Can we try sourdough bread instead of white bread?"
    "Can we try quinoa instead of bread stuffing?"
    Thanks! I definitely tried some of these and my parents were very happy to take me food shopping with them! ... and i learned a few things about choosing fruits, vegetables, and deals also! So i guess I should stop arguing with my parents that grains aren't that good for you and instead, try to convince them to buy more primal food.... thanks a lot for the tips!

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottaluvalab View Post
    This sounds like the way to go.

    I don't have children--but I do work with teenagers (and their parents) every day. I would accentuate the positive and eliminate (or avoid) the negative.

    "I know you made spaghetti, but can I have a salad?" What parent is going to argue with THAT?

    Unless they "know what you are up to" now.

    So make a promise, and fulfill it.

    "I know you're worried about fiber--but I'm eating a salad. I listened to you, and I've really thought about fiber. There's, like 8 grams here, which is way more than in the pasta. I promise I'll make sure to get fiber."

    "I know you're worried about my getting enough carbohydrates. But I listened to you and thought about it. I made sure to eat three servings of fruit. I promise I won't starve myself of carbohydrates."

    I think if you say, "I'm trying to eat good, whole foods. I promise I won't get crazy on you," and then follow through, you'll be fine.

    But if you're living off of jerky, burgers without a bun, diet sodas, and cheese sticks...

    well, you might have a problem with the 'rents.

    (Do you youngsters still say 'rents? Seriously--I need to know--work related!)
    Well, it kinda easy for my parents to figure out "what I'm up to" because we're an asian family and for dinner, we eat rice everyday so....you kinda stick out if you don't eat rice... and we also go out to eat at asian restaurants on Sundays and i never know what to pick from the menu. Almost everything involves rice and noodles! So i end up sticking out every Sunday also...

    ... and i don't really know what " 'rents" means... i don't really know that much about sayings.....i know some asian sayings though..

  8. #28
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    'rents = (pa)rents.

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