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Thread: Low-carb diets 'damage arteries' page

  1. #1
    Rannoch's Avatar
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    This article appears in the BBC news site today and references a US study.


    "After 12 weeks, the mice eating the low-carb diet had gained less weight, but developed 15% more atherosclerosis than those on the standard mice food."


    Damn those pesky rodents for not exercising!


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8218780.stm


  2. #2
    DebFM's Avatar
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    I saw that, too. Um, are mice supposed to be eating a low carb diet? Don't they normally eat grains? I see shades of that force-fed rabbit study...


  3. #3
    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    DebFM gets the Critical Thinking Gold Star of the day!


  4. #4
    Mick's Avatar
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    [quote]

    This article appears in the BBC news site today and references a US study.


    "After 12 weeks, the mice eating the low-carb diet had gained less weight, but developed 15% more atherosclerosis than those on the standard mice food."
    </blockquote>


    Hmmm ...


    I&#39;m seeing more of these "studies" recently. I wonder why. :-)


    From the linked article:
    [quote]

    Diets based on eating lots of meat, fish and cheese, while restricting carbohydrates have grown in popularity in recent years.
    </blockquote>


    Ah! so that&#39;s it. Follow the money ... that&#39;s bad for agribusiness, isn&#39;t it?


    BTW, it&#39;s amusing to see the BBC using the semi-literate and scientifically ignorant expression "carb".


    Then there&#39;s this:
    [quote]

    The researchers at the Beth Israel institute, which is part of Harvard Medical School, decided to investigate their impact on the cardiovascular system after hearing of reports of people on the diets suffering heart attacks.
    </blockquote>


    Oh! they "heard about people", did they? Nice to hear this has such a solid basis.


    Of course, the real information to bear in mind is that there seems to have been no traditional society in which people ate a high-carbohydrate diet, and people living in traditional societies and eating their traditional foods had a high level of health and an almost complete absence of many of the degenerative diseases that plague our society. But let&#39;s not draw attention to that ...


    http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/price/pricetoc.html


    And, of course, if some people on contemporary special diets really have had "heart attacks" (although maybe this has been simply made up), who knows what those people might have been eating? It&#39;s an imponderable. What people in traditional societies ate is not: it&#39;s known. Funny how organizations like the BBC keep avoiding that one ...


    Then there&#39;s this:
    [quote]

    They fed the mice three different diets - a standard mouse type, a western diet which was high in fat, and a low-carb, high-protein version
    </blockquote>


    Right. But don&#39;t tell us what&#39;s in the "standard mouse diet". As for "a western diet which was high in fat" - that&#39;s nearly meaningless. First off, the current "western" [sic] (or even Western) diet is not "high in fat". Secondly, this doesn&#39;t state WHICH fats - so is even more meaningless.


    And as for "and a low-carb [sic], high-protein version" - were these unfortunate mice fed on a diet that was high in protein but low in the animal fats that should accompany lean meat? We&#39;re not told. Again: what was the source of these "carbs [sc. carbohydrates] and this protein? We&#39;re not told.


    In other words, this is yet another highly disreputable "study" that is mean to deceive the public.


    Why are these laboratory animals not fed on real human diets, as Sir Robert McCarrison did with his rats? Why is the precise composition of the diet in terms of foodstuffs not macro-nutrients never given?


    Something stinks. The BBC, which headlines this, also had two programmes running this week trying to persuade people to eat more high-carbohydrate food with a lot of really disreputable and specious reasoning to try to persuade them. Maybe someone&#39;s pulling the BBC&#39;s chain. One "argument" amusingly enough was that fewer cows should be farmed because they break wind - presumably the BBC would prefer people to be breaking wind instead.


    But one thing is for sure: if people in traditional societies eating their traditional foods were healthy on a normal human diet that people have been eating for thousands upon thousands of years we should follow their lead.


  5. #5
    rphlslv's Avatar
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    What the hell do mice have to do with OUR diet anyway? Are these people kidding me

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  6. #6
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    i love how people try to show diet studies using mice and rats. because somehow their digestion and hormonal system match the human response? utter crap.

    btw not a rag on you OP, but on BBC and the "scientists"


  7. #7
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    <Rant> Unfortunately, as Mick has pointed out, what passes for BBC news these days is ofen nothing more than an uncritical regurgitation of a corporate or government press release. It&#39;s usually accompanied by some rent-a-gob with the tag "there are calls for..".


    The standards are appalling.</rant>


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