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Thread: Skim milk powder in greek yogurt? page

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    Saoirse's Avatar
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    Skim milk powder in greek yogurt?

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    This question is more about commercial yogurt, not about making yogurt (I could always make yogurt and then strain it for a greek-style yogurt). I bought a container of Greek Gods yogurt. it was delicious with a bit of honey and strawberry powder. However, I know that if "milk" is an ingredient in a commercial product, they don't have to add "skim milk powder" to the ingredients list even if it's an ingredient. I perused the Greek Gods yogurt site and couldn't find any information about this. Does anyone know one way or another that it doesn't have skim milk powder? I guess I could email the company... (btw, Greek Gods is the only full-fat greek-style yogurt i can find in the stores. Voskos, Oikos, and Greek-style Brown cow only come fat-free)

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    bloodorchid's Avatar
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    i don't know why it would be added except to 'richen' it up, but greek yogurt by definition is thick and rich. so. i dunno, why?

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    They add it to thicken it. I don't like the idea of consuming skim milk powder, too processed for my taste. I know there's a more scientific reason why skim milk powder is unhealthy, but I can't think of it exactly right now, so we'll just stick with "I don't like it".

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    I am very interested in the what goes on with milk.
    The following is from http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-f...g-industry.htm
    I think this explains why you don't like the taste, in my opinion it is no longer real food.

    ....The dairy industry loves to sell low fat milk and skim milk because they can make a lot more money from the butterfat when consumers buy it as ice cream. When they remove the fat to make reduced fat milks, they replace the fat with powdered milk concentrate, which is formed by high temperature spray drying. All reduced-fat milks have dried skim milk added to give them body, although this ingredient is not usually on the labels. The result is a very high-protein, lowfat product. Because the body uses up many nutrients to assimilate protein—especially the nutrients contained in animal fat—such doctored milk can quickly lead to nutrient deficiencies.

    The milk is then pasteurized at 161 degrees F by rushing it past superheated stainless steel plates. If the temperature is 200 degrees the milk is called ultrapasteurized. This will have a distinct cooked milk taste but it is sterile and can be sold on the grocery shelf. In other words, they don't even have to keep it cool. The bugs won't touch it. It does not require refrigeration. As it is cooked, the milk is also homogenized by a pressure treatment that breaks down the fat globules so the milk won't separate. Once processed, the milk will last for weeks, not just days......

    Powdered Milk
    A note on the production of skim milk powder: liquid milk is forced through a tiny hole at high pressure, and then blown out into the air. This causes a lot of nitrates to form and the cholesterol in the milk is oxidized. Those of you who are familiar with my work know that cholesterol is your best friend; you don't have to worry about natural cholesterol in your food; however, you do not want to eat oxidized cholesterol. Oxidized cholesterol contributes to the buildup of plaque in the arteries, to atherosclerosis. So when you drink reduced-fat milk thinking that it will help you avoid heart disease, you are actually consuming oxidized cholesterol, which initiates the process of heart disease.
    l
    Last edited by Louise; 10-08-2010 at 10:18 PM.

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    bloodorchid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saoirse View Post
    They add it to thicken it. I don't like the idea of consuming skim milk powder, too processed for my taste. I know there's a more scientific reason why skim milk powder is unhealthy, but I can't think of it exactly right now, so we'll just stick with "I don't like it".
    but they shouldn't have to, greek yogurt is just strained yogurt so it's already hella thick. i'm just lost on the reasoning right now, my mind is blown to wtfsville

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    My guess would be that you get more yogurt and less whey from the straining process if the milk powder is added. I've tried this at home with my homemade yogurt and it sure seems to be the case. So they add the milk powder and are able to increase their yogurt yield and that means more money!

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    I would stick with the plain, it is only 5g of carbs. Pomegranate is 14g of carbs which is three times as much, and it goes up from there. Honey Strawberry has over seven times as many carbs as plain.

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    but honey greek yogurt is so damn good

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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodorchid View Post
    but honey greek yogurt is so damn good
    The honey is not quite as bad as their new honey strawberry. I tried the honey strawberry and it was too good. I need to cut down on the candy.

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    guys, i was just talking about the plain, and i add my own raw, local honey and strawberry powder (from Just Tomatoes).

    Bacon mint-that was my reasoning. how else do they get fat free greek-style yogurt? It's from adding skim milk powder. I'm wondering if they do the same thing (though they would have to add significantly less skim milk powder) to the "full-fat" yogurt to get a thicker product. They also add pectin, so we know that the body isn't completely from straining the yogurt. I'm starting to wonder if I should just make my own from local milk. I bet it would be a lot cheaper.
    Louise- THANK YOU!! That's exactly what it was that I had read and couldn't remember. It was mostly the oxidized cholesterol that concerns me, though i try to avoid highly processed ingredients (though i realize that seems hypocritical considering I added strawberry powder to my yogurt).

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