Hi all,

I don't know how many Kiwi's are regulars on here, but if by any chance you're in Auckland, or are going to be on any of these dates, I thought this series of free lectures would be right up your alley. I've booked already so if you can make it I'll see you there

For more info and to book, click here: http://www.liggins.auckland.ac.nz/uo...jsp?cid=321375

Nutrition - more than a good square meal

The theme for the Liggins Institute's 2010 Seasons of Life lecture series is Nutrition – more than a good square meal. Five leading New Zealand scientists and communicators will examine aspects of the foods and nutrients that we consume and comment on how they affect our development, health and well-being.

Nutrition is a recurring theme that runs through much of the Institute’s research, with scientists having shown that early life nutrition has a profound effect on health throughout life. The lecture series explores broader aspects of ‘nutrition’ including the ways in which people might personalise foods and their diets to optimise health and performance, lessons we can learn from animals in the wild and the effects of industrial contaminants.

The lectures will be held at The University of Auckland over five consecutive Wednesdays beginning on 13 October at 6pm. The lectures are designed for non-scientific audiences and questions are welcomed. They are free and open to the public, however places are limited and bookings are essential.

13 October
Matching our diet to our genes: a new way to optimise our health
Professor Lynn Ferguson, Head of the Discipline of Nutrition at The University of Auckland explains how understanding the way our genes interact with our environment and the food we eat will help to reduce our risk of developing particular diseases.

20 October
You are what your mother eats: the impact of maternal nutrition on children’s reproductive development
Liggins Institute scientist Dr Deborah Sloboda explores the ways in which a mother’s diet during pregnancy and lactation affects her children's reproductive health and development.

27 October
A delicate balance: foraging, food and fat
Biologist and adventurer, Professor David Raubenheimer, Institute of Natural Sciences, Massey University, visits jungles and mountain tops to explain how observing animals in the wild can help us to understand why humans over-eat energy rich foods and become obese.

03 November
Super foods
Co-Director of the Centre of Research Excellence, the Riddet Institute, Professor Paul Moughan introduces some of the new foods that are being developed to increase the value of what we eat.

10 November
Is it safe to eat?
In the final lecture Ian Shaw, Professor of Toxicology at University of Canterbury and Professor of Food Safety at Lincoln University,explains that industrialisation has resulted in tens of thousands of new chemical contaminants – some of these get into our food and are having biological effects that will change our futures.