Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: "...likely to prove challenging for many consumers to meet" page

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1

    Primal Fuel


    This article pissed me off (excuse my language):


    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204660604574370851517144132.html?m od=rss_Today%27s_Most_Popular


    So, what this article says to me (1st off), in response to the American Heart Association's new 'sugar reduction guidelines', is that 'normal/ average' Americans consume up to 22 tsp of sugar per day (OMG!!!), so this new reduced-consumption guideline is too strict!???!


    I am soooo done with CW and their media....


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1



    "We're trying to make reasonable recommendations around the amount of sugar in a diet that enables people to achieve or maintain a healthy weight,..."


    (GOD FORBID the AHA is suggesting such UNREASONABLE guidelines!!!) ROLLING MY EYES


  3. #3
    frogfarm's Avatar
    frogfarm is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    trudgin' across the tundra, mile after mile
    Posts
    45

    1



    That line of argument has always been a complete cop-out, I think best rebutted by my redneck grandpappy:


    "If it was easy, any a**hole could do it."


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1



    "While many studies associate increased consumption of soft drinks with higher calorie intake, weight gain and obesity, others have failed to support the connection. Similarly, research investigating added sugar's impact on blood pressure, heightened inflammation and on changes in blood fats called triglycerides is inconclusive. And there are no studies linking the recommended limits to preventing weight gain or promoting weight loss."


    This journalist needs to do some better research.


  5. #5
    SullynNH's Avatar
    SullynNH Guest

    1



    I just read the same thing, officemate sent it too me...I like how they talk to added sugars....does the body discriminate in how it processes sugar? I think not....I like the escape clause too that you cited (rolls eyes)....


  6. #6
    bcreager's Avatar
    bcreager Guest

    1



    After reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories", I'm not sure I'll ever believe anything the AHA says again.


    People just can't cut out sugar, so lets just change the recommended amount...talk about backwards logic!


    -bcreager


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1



    Just sent a scathing email and this link: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-08/uops-psf082609.php


    to those journalistic idiots with "The Wall Street" journal.


    I must be getting old, but my tolerance for lazy, misinformed journalists and their lack of research is really starting to chap my hide. People are sheep and take what they say as 'God's word' and run with it!!!


  8. #8
    SeanBissell's Avatar
    SeanBissell is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    26

    1



    Sassa,


    You should post it here


    I wanna see!

    -Sean


  9. #9
    mrd232's Avatar
    mrd232 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bethlehem, PA
    Posts
    4

    1



    Of course it's challenging with those handy AHA recommendations of 2 bowls of Honey Nut Cheerios (12g sugar per serving) per day.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    30

    1

    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Ron & Shirley,


    I have a lot of beef with many statements contained within your (seemingly, poorly researched) article, but the one statement, in particular really showed your lack of research on this subject:


    Quote: "While many studies associate increased consumption of soft drinks with higher calorie intake, weight gain and obesity, others have failed to support the connection. Similarly, research investigating added sugar's impact on blood pressure, heightened inflammation and on changes in blood fats called triglycerides is inconclusive. And there are no studies linking the recommended limits to preventing weight gain or promoting weight loss."


    Try this on for size (and there are OH SO MANY more):


    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-08/uops-psf082609.php


    Although I may not be of journalist status, I would challenge you to complete a 'devil's advocate' view on the 'other side' of this spectrum (ie, the research into possible insulin resistance and it's affect on diabetes, obesity and numerous inflammatory diseases, main-media resources not-withstanding).


    Just the fact that you suggested that the AHA's recommendations were 'lofty' based on the nation's average consumer is a rather idiotic statement in-itself ("The recommendations are likely to prove challenging for many consumers to meet."), regardless of the fact that they were not including natural sugars in fruits themselves (a sugar is a sugar).


    I've NEVER written to a journalist in response to their article before, however I am now more put off, than ever, to main media outlets and their choices in journalists (and there were TWO of you whom contributed to this disaster of misinformation).


    Personally, since reducing my insulin intake (in ALL forms), my insulin resistance has lowered and my eczema, acne, persistent sicknesses (ie, colds, flus, etc) & tendinitis have been eradicated. Inflammatory conditions? I would say so. And this is coming from an already 'healthy' individual.

    I beg of you, please restore my faith in the media and the journalists cranking out these messages that people tend to 'cling' to like words from the Holy Bible itself.


    Regards,


    ~ Ingrid


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •