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Thread: Dy-No-Mite Beef Tallow and Cracklings, EZ PZ page

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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    Dy-No-Mite Beef Tallow and Cracklings, EZ PZ

    Primal Fuel
    Tallow is what McDonalds cooked their justly famous French fries in until the Hindus and Center for Public Science had their ways about 1990. It's the beef equivalent of lard, and is almost the same except more saturated fat, less monounsaturated with tallow. Tallow seems to be a forgotten staple, unavailable except by mail; not even butchers or meat markets have a line on it.

    But make your own and you have a cooking fat with a hint of steak! Did you know that beef cracklings are more properly known as "greaves?" Neither did I until I really got into this. Double yummy!

    Mark has a post on making tallow, http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-t...r-beef-tallow/ but I went my own way with excellent results.

    All you need is a source of beef fat from trimmings. A "high end" type butcher counter in a grocery store here (Publix) works for me, thanks, Gary! Your knife must be very sharp. Cut into roughly 1/2" pieces, don't worry about the bits of meat. Spread out on some type of screen; I have some old fashioned 1/4" hardware cloth that also duties up for jerky. Underneath the screen, place a pan of appropriate size and shape. Turn the oven to 300 degrees for an hour, hour and a half. If the remaining pieces are a nice crispy brown, it's done. If desired, press the remaining greaves to push the oil out.

    I filter through a paper towel in a funnel while hot, but not oven hot, into a glass jar. Not necessary, but why not? You will have a slightly brown liquid that at the mythological "room temperature" may be liquid, semi liquid, or slightly hard. In a fridge, very hard.

    From two pounds of fat expect about 5-6 ounces of greaves and a pint of tallow.

    Tallow has replaced lard for me for pan frying. Lard has a very slight funky smell that I never appreciated, anyway.

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    Fiddlersmom2's Avatar
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    Hello! I just rendered my first batch of beef tallow by cooking about a pound or so in the crock pot on low setting. It was soooo easy! After a couple of hours you'll see the cracklings and then let cool for a few minutes before pouring into a container. I used a paper towel in a sifter to catch the cracklings in. Turned out great! Then poured into wide mouth quart jar for a FULL quart. Hope this helps y'all.

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    Follow-up question/clarification: Over the weekend I oven roasted a pan of grass fed beef bones to make stock with. I saved what I drained off the pan, it was quite clear and "clean" looking, didn't even need straining. Now it has solidified and is in the refrigerator. Is that tallow or is that lard or is that something else--? And what can I do with it?????

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    Is it more a jelly than creamy fat?
    I'd call it dripping (maybe it's melted marrow?), and use it a bit like stock, to make a delicious stew

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    breadsauce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lolly View Post
    Follow-up question/clarification: Over the weekend I oven roasted a pan of grass fed beef bones to make stock with. I saved what I drained off the pan, it was quite clear and "clean" looking, didn't even need straining. Now it has solidified and is in the refrigerator. Is that tallow or is that lard or is that something else--? And what can I do with it?????
    If it has set white and hard, it is lard (tallow) and can be used for cooking. But as NMG says, if it is jelly, then it is stock and can be used as a basis for stew / soup / sauce etc.

    I'd guess the first.

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