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Thread: Agave Vs Honey Vs Stevia! Great Article page

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    PrimalGoddess's Avatar
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    Agave nectar, honey and stevia not necessarily healthy sugar alternatives


    Dr. Michael Roizen, Dr. Mehmet Oz

    The You Docs

    Monday, February 16, 2009


    When it comes to satisfying the occasional sweet tooth, we're not big fans of artificial sweeteners. The trouble with these no-calorie additives is that they're essentially invisible to your brain's satiety center, so they never quite "fix" a sweet craving. The result: They usually send you foraging for something else ... and something after that, and something else after that. Enter the newly hyped "natural" sweeteners. Are they any better? Or just more expensive? Here's what you need to know:


    Agave nectar or agave syrup


    The facts: This sugary syrup is made from the cactuslike South American agave plant. On the flavor front, it tastes similar to honey. While agave has the same number as calories as sugar, it has an unexpected upside: Because it's seriously sweeter than sucrose (aka table sugar) you don't need nearly as much of it, resulting in a big calorie savings. How much? You can use one-quarter to one-eighth the amount of agave nectar to deliver the same sweetening power you'd get from sugar. Agave fans also like it for its low glycemic index (Translation: It doesn't raise your blood sugar as quickly or as much as sugar.). But that hardly makes it diet food. In the end, agave still delivers a spoonful of empty calories, so don't think you can load up on it and expect to squeeze into your favorite jeans.


    Our verdict: Try it for the occasional sweet treat, or when you absolutely must use sugar in a recipe.


    Honey


    The facts: The original all-natural sweetener, honey has been prized for its supposed health perks for centuries. And while it has more antioxidant power than, say, refined sugar, it's hardly going to stomp out all those free radicals that age you.


    In fact, a January 2009 Journal of the American Dietetic Association study of different sweeteners ranked honey only as intermediate on the antioxidant power scale, falling behind heavyweights such as dark and blackstrap molasses.


    But the real shocker is that honey packs 33 percent more calories than sugar. That means a tablespoon will set you back 64 calories compared with 48 calories for a tablespoon of sugar.


    Our verdict: A teaspoon of honey in your tea is fine, but calorie-wise and blood sugar-wise, it's a worse bet than sugar.


    Stevia


    The facts: With zero calories and 200 times the sweetness of sugar, you'd think that stevia would be the perfect sweetener. Especially since it comes from a plant instead of a lab. Not so fast: Until last year, the FDA wouldn't even allow stevia to be sold as a food ingredient because of concerns about potential reproductive harm and infertility. That meant you had to trek all the way to a health-food store to get it.


    A newer body of research (supported by the same companies that lobbied the FDA to lift the stevia ban) concludes the stuff is safe. So today, you can find several stevia-derived sweeteners (including Truvia and PureVia) in your local supermarket parked right next to the sugar.


    Pretty soon it will be popping up everywhere: Now that stevia is fair game, food manufacturers are scrambling to add it to all kinds of foods and drinks. While it's still unclear exactly how safe stevia is, proponents point out that it has been used in Japan for more than 30 years to sweeten pickles. That's not the strongest argument since the Japanese don't eat pickles all day long the way we swig diet soda.


    And if you think this sweetener is a shortcut to a flatter belly, remember that like other calorie-free sweeteners, the part of your brain that's responsible for satiety doesn't recognize stevia, either. So stevia-sweetened foods may not even make you feel satisfied the way a little bit of sugar does.


    Our verdict: The occasional stevia-sweetened drink is OK, but we wouldn't use it to fill your sugar bowl just yet.


    When it comes to any sweetener, remember that "all natural" doesn't mean "better." After all, cyanide is natural. The best way to enjoy sugar is still in its truly natural forms: as in fruit and other naturally sweet-tasting foods. You can retrain your taste buds by s-l-o-w-l-y weaning yourself off sugary foods. Then, for those occasional times when you do need some sweetness, don't feel guilty about adding a teaspoon (that's a teaspoon, not a tablespoon) of sugar or agave to an otherwise good-for-you food or drink.


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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    So, because Stevia can elicit a brain response? Wow, that's an indictment..


    He also doesn't mention that Japan has stevia sweetened Coke.


    And everyone here, by now, should know about agave being a Mexican HFCS, essentially. It's even made the same way, except it is almost all fructose, no sucrose.


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    Here is what the WAPF says about Agave:


    http://www.westonaprice.org/modernfood/HFCSAgave.pdf


    In spite of manufacturers’ claims, agave “nectar” is not made from the sap of the yucca or agave plant but from the starch of the giant pineapple-like, root bulb. The principal constituent of the agave root is starch, similar to the starch in corn or rice, and a complex carbohydrate called inulin, which is made up of chains of fructose molecules. Technically a highly indigestible fiber, inulin, which does not taste sweet, comprises about half of the carbohydrate content of agave.


    See the article for full details.

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    Here is an article about these two doctors

    Good or bad you decide-

    http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/w...d-real-sleazy/


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    Katt's Avatar
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    I'd have to vote sleazy.

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    OnTheBayou's Avatar
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    katt, enzyme processing from starch is how "corn syrup" or glucose syrup is made in the US. It's an old, old process, and mimics what happens in our digestive system with starches. We break it down into the shorter sugar molecules, just like the enzymes do.


    So, the plant or the part of the plant the starch comes from is not of concern. Actually, the process isn't either.


    It's the end result, up to 95% fructose.


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    Katt's Avatar
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    Yes, OTB, I know. But thank you. I was just putting up alternative views from an oft-quoted site.

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    Oh man, I liked Dr. Oz. <sigh> Another illusion shattered.


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    I still like Dr Oz

    I mean who are the people that wrote the article?

    How trust worthy are they?

    I go with my gut and I like a lot of things Dr Oz says xoxo Darlene


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    From what I know about Dr. Oz, having listened to his radio show, he still bases his recommendations on the low fat, calories in-calories out theories. So, I typically take his advice with a grain of salt, or sugar, in this case.


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