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Thread: sprints on a treadmill? How to go about it? page 3

  1. #21
    JulieRUNS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maranne View Post
    I would like to start incorporating sprints at the gym and don't really know how to go about it.
    Has anyone got any tips on how to do it?
    Do I just increase the speed on the treadmill and start running as fast as I can?

    Thanks in advance!
    M
    Sprinting on the treadmill is a great place to start! Living in Chicago, I hate the cold, and have to get my fix so I've been doing this for years. I recommended this to my 75 year old mom and my newly divorced brother and they got in great shape doing this.

    I have no idea what your fitness level is but I'll give you examples -

    First warm-up for a few minutes and then when ready:

    raise your speed to say 6.0 and go for 1 minute
    then lower speed back down to 3.0 for 1 minute
    then raise speed up to 6.0 again for 1 minute
    then back down for 3.0 for 1 minute

    You will do this until you have complete 8-10 sprints. Your last sprint should be feeling like you will hardly make it-- completely and totally exhausted by the last one. You may have to play around with your speed to find your point but its so great to be able to see your improvement and how quickly you can move up.

    I just gave you example numbers but my high interval is at speed 9.6 and my low is at 3.5

    Lastly, imagine you are a soccer player on the field and waiting for the ball and while you are running you are taking it for the team!!!

    Have fun you will feel fabulous when you are done.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieRUNS View Post
    Sprinting on the treadmill is a great place to start! Living in Chicago, I hate the cold, and have to get my fix so I've been doing this for years. I recommended this to my 75 year old mom and my newly divorced brother and they got in great shape doing this.

    I have no idea what your fitness level is but I'll give you examples -

    First warm-up for a few minutes and then when ready:

    raise your speed to say 6.0 and go for 1 minute
    then lower speed back down to 3.0 for 1 minute
    then raise speed up to 6.0 again for 1 minute
    then back down for 3.0 for 1 minute

    You will do this until you have complete 8-10 sprints. Your last sprint should be feeling like you will hardly make it-- completely and totally exhausted by the last one. You may have to play around with your speed to find your point but its so great to be able to see your improvement and how quickly you can move up.

    I just gave you example numbers but my high interval is at speed 9.6 and my low is at 3.5

    Lastly, imagine you are a soccer player on the field and waiting for the ball and while you are running you are taking it for the team!!!

    Have fun you will feel fabulous when you are done.
    Again, this is not sprint training. When Mark talks about sprints, it's all out. 6.0 mph is a fast jog. And nobody can sprint for a minute. This is a fine interval program, but not sprinting.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abu Reena View Post
    Again, this is not sprint training. When Mark talks about sprints, it's all out. 6.0 mph is a fast jog. And nobody can sprint for a minute. This is a fine interval program, but not sprinting.
    Since you do not know about the health, age, or physical ability of every person that visits this forum I'd appreciate it if you could/would not make blanket statements as to what does or does not constitute a sprint/all out effort.

    What is a sprint for me may not be a sprint for you. Your narrow perspective does not change my effort or benefit.

    If it helps you gain a new perspective --I have cerebral palsy, with bone on bone knee arthritis. Sprinting on a treadmill, at a speed that challenges/is all out for me works for ME. Context is important.

  4. #24
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    If it helps you gain a new perspective --I have cerebral palsy, with bone on bone knee arthritis. Sprinting on a treadmill, at a speed that challenges/is all out for me works for ME. Context is important.
    His point is valid though - if you are incapable of sprinting then that's fair enough; I don't see how calling it sprinting when it isn't is doing you any favors. Most of what has been described in this thread is interval training (which is very effective, but not sprinting). Nobody can go flat out for a minute. Usain Bolt can do 100 meters in 9.58 seconds, but he will never do 628m = 100m x (60s / 9.58s) meters in a minute because he cannot maintain a sprint for that long.

    Sprinting on a treadmill is not really possible. Firstly by establishing a speed you are limiting your effort, and secondly because it would be incredibly dangerous, as sudden failure would involve a nasty fall onto the moving equipment.

    If you have been 'sprinting' on a machine, I would strongly encourage you to find a 75 to 100 meter stretch (I like a soccer field) and try a "true" sprint for comparison. Running is far and away the best way to push yourself to maximum intensity as it works the vast majority of your muscles, and is also fairly forgiving in the event of catastrophic failure (particularly on sand or grass).

    In addition, using a fixed distance which is readily completable encourages you to truly try for speed & intensity. If you are doing interval training it is far too easy to lower your intensity to finish the whole 60 seconds instead of truly going all out for 20 and stopping because you can't continue. This is the difference between sprinting and interval training; the notion of duration as a goal and sprinting is largely incompatible. I do interval training in a 5m/1m format and the pacing is RADICALLY lower than sprinting, simply because it is impossible for me to maintain a true sprint for longer than about 15-20 seconds.

    Sprinting is about intensity; your sprinting session ends when you can taste blood on your breath and you are literally ready to fall over.

    In answer to the original question, there are two ways I am aware of to sprint at the gym: on a stationary bike, and using a jumprope (which should, incidentally, look something like this). However, as explained above, it is going to be much easier to drive yourself to maximum output by running.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    Since you do not know about the health, age, or physical ability of every person that visits this forum I'd appreciate it if you could/would not make blanket statements as to what does or does not constitute a sprint/all out effort.

    What is a sprint for me may not be a sprint for you. Your narrow perspective does not change my effort or benefit.

    If it helps you gain a new perspective --I have cerebral palsy, with bone on bone knee arthritis. Sprinting on a treadmill, at a speed that challenges/is all out for me works for ME. Context is important.
    No. Context is not important. There are people who cannot sprint. I get that. But sprinting is not running a 10 minute mile for any period of time as one of the posters above said. I am fat and I am slow, but I can fly (relatively speaking) for 15-25 seconds. And really, closer to 15. As JHC said, at the end of it, you should be tasting blood, heaving from exertion, and ready to almost puke. If you've done it right, that is. Anything else may be a good interval workout, but it is not sprinting. If all a person can do is walk, that's great, do it. But it's not a sprint workout.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abu Reena View Post
    No. Context is not important. There are people who cannot sprint. I get that. But sprinting is not running a 10 minute mile for any period of time as one of the posters above said. I am fat and I am slow, but I can fly (relatively speaking) for 15-25 seconds. And really, closer to 15. As JHC said, at the end of it, you should be tasting blood, heaving from exertion, and ready to almost puke. If you've done it right, that is. Anything else may be a good interval workout, but it is not sprinting. If all a person can do is walk, that's great, do it. But it's not a sprint workout.
    I was not the person that considered running a minute or so at 6mph a sprint.
    My point is this-- what constitutes a sprint(all out exertion) for one person (moving at 6mph or any other speed for 10-30 seconds) should not be judged as "not a sprint" by anyone else. The method used to exert oneself--be it outdoor running, treadmill running or inclines, stationary bikes, etc. should also not be judged, by anyone other than the person involved, as right or wrong.

    Sprinting, as I see it, is moving as fast as one is capable of for a very short period of time. Then repeated as many times as the person is able. The details and parameters of "the sprint" are person specific.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    I was not the person that considered running a minute or so at 6mph a sprint.
    My point is this-- what constitutes a sprint(all out exertion) for one person (moving at 6mph or any other speed for 10-30 seconds) should not be judged as "not a sprint" by anyone else. The method used to exert oneself--be it outdoor running, treadmill running or inclines, stationary bikes, etc. should also not be judged, by anyone other than the person involved, as right or wrong.

    Sprinting, as I see it, is moving as fast as one is capable of for a very short period of time. Then repeated as many times as the person is able. The details and parameters of "the sprint" are person specific.
    I don't disagree with that. But if you can do it for a minute, it ain't sprinting. I'm not saying one can't sprint on a treadmill. It's difficult, but not impossible (by difficult, I mean dangerous!).

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by serenity View Post
    I do sprints on a treadmill too. I increase the incline slightly during the sprint intervals in order to compensate for the fact that there will be no air resistance on the treadmill. (Note: You should always have at least a 1% incline when running on treadmills to compensate for lack of air resistance and to avoid shin splints.) So when I sprint I increase the incline to 2%.

    I warm up for about a mile, then sprint at 10 mph or 10.5 mph for 40 seconds. My rest intervals are usually 90 seconds if I walk during those intervals, longer if I jog. It is totally doable although it is annoying to have to manually increase/decrease the speed. Personally, I get a better workout on the treadmill because my only other option is sprinting on the sidewalk. I'm always afraid of tripping and falling when running on the sidewalk so I never go all-out when sprinting on the sidewalk. Plus, there are intersections and on-coming traffic that could disrupt my sprints. (I live in the city, don't have access to a track, and don't have a car so my only option is really the sidewalk.) The treadmill works for me--not ideal but works.
    This is similar to what I do. But sometimes it's more like 9.5-10 mph (with an incline too). At 10 mph I feel like I'm flailing around everywhere. lol I'm 5'6. How tall are you serenity?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post

    Sprinting, as I see it, is moving as fast as one is capable of for a very short period of time. Then repeated as many times as the person is able. The details and parameters of "the sprint" are person specific.
    That's what I thought a sprint was too.

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