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Thread: Uses for chicken carcass? page

  1. #1
    BoyPrimal's Avatar
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    Uses for chicken carcass?

    Primal Fuel
    In the spirit of going Primal, and in the spirit of "I'm too damn broke for this" I'm taking up a use every part of the buffalo philosophy. I'm roasting my squash seeds, using all my leftovers, and now I want to find a use for all the bones and leftover bits of my weekly chicken.

    Can anyone help me out with some creative, tasty uses for a chicken carcass?

  2. #2
    Hilary's Avatar
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    Well, break it up, put it in a pan with some woody herbs and the odd bit of vegetable (half an onion, garlic cloves, carrot, whatever you feel like) and squish it down so you don't need gallons of water, cover with cold water, bring to the boil, skim off the scum, simmer very gently for a couple of hours, strain.

    Then you have chicken stock. And then you have to work out what to do with that... which is where I'm hoping someone else will pitch in, as mine tends to sit in the fridge for far too long.

  3. #3
    yodiewan's Avatar
    yodiewan is online now Senior Member
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    Chicken stock is definitely what you should do with the bones. Use it to make soups and sauces. Maybe a squash soup garnished with squash seeds, since you're using those too!

  4. #4
    Annika's Avatar
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    A chicken carcass makes the best damn broth you will ever taste. I save veggie ends & bits in the freezer (carrot, onion, garlic, celery) and dump those in a stockpot with my chicken bones. Add a splash of vinegar to extract the minerals from the bones and simmer for a few hours. I usually drain the broth and add more water for a second batch because there's still lots o' goodness in that carcass and I can't stand to throw it away. The second batch won't be as delicious, but it'll still be worlds better than the canned junk. I store my broth in the freezer and use it whenever I make soup, curry, or braised/stewed meat.
    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
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  5. #5
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    I second the idea of making the stock...it has a lot of wonderful uses!

  6. #6
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    A great use is to make a hearty chicken soup:

    Make the broth from the carcass. Simmer it very slowly for a couple of hours along with an onion and a carrot, perhaps some fresh dill or parsley.
    Salt to taste near the end.

    Strain the broth.

    Use this to make any variation of chicken soup.

    To make Thai Chicken Soup, saute some thin-sliced onions with a bit of garlic, ginger, and lemongrass. Add this saute to your soup with the chunks of leftover chicken, heat through, add some coconut milk, heat again.

    To make Korean Chicken Soup, add some kim chee with thin-sliced onions and the chicken chunks.

    To make Jewish Chicken Soup, add fresh dill, sliced parsnip and sliced carrot along with your chicken chunks.

    To make Greek chicken soup, add lemon juice, and carefully swirl an egg or two into the broth.

    To make Italian chicken soup, add egg and grated (high quality) hard cheese.

    To make Italian wedding soup, add tiny meatballs and chopped escarole leaves.

    To make African chicken soup, add peanut butter, cut-up yams, and something spicy and hot to taste.

    To make a chicken stew, thicken your broth with some primal thickener----almond flour, coconut flour, or arrowroot powder by adding a bit of the hot broth to the powder in a small bowl. When a uniform paste, add it to the pot of broth and stir until thickened. (You can repeat this step using small amounts of thickener until you get it to the consistency you like.) Then add your chunks of chicken, cut up vegetables of choice, a touch of coconut milk, and bake in the oven until bubbly. Serve over cauliflower rice.

    Sooze

  7. #7
    lizch's Avatar
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    A great trick I learnt from the PB cookbook....leave the carcass (along with onions/leeks/celery/carrots/bay leaf/garlic) in the slow cooker/crock pot for 24 hours, covered with water and a bit of vinegar. It makes stock that's richer than anything I've ever made or bought. I've got some simmering away right now. Mmmmm.
    Liz.

    Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
    Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

  8. #8
    primalmaven's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Annika View Post
    A chicken carcass makes the best damn broth you will ever taste. I save veggie ends & bits in the freezer (carrot, onion, garlic, celery) and dump those in a stockpot with my chicken bones. Add a splash of vinegar to extract the minerals from the bones and simmer for a few hours. I usually drain the broth and add more water for a second batch because there's still lots o' goodness in that carcass and I can't stand to throw it away. The second batch won't be as delicious, but it'll still be worlds better than the canned junk. I store my broth in the freezer and use it whenever I make soup, curry, or braised/stewed meat.
    I use this broth making method as well but never tried the 2nd batch. I use broth anytime I need water for veggies, sauces on meats (to help get a little more butter in the mix), and roasting in the oven when the recipe calls for water in the roasting pan etc. You can then make a flour-free gravy with the drippings.

    Sometimes the flavor is a little strong for some uses (maybe use half water/half broth) but I feel the added nutrition from the bones is worth it. I am making "potato using turnips" soup today and instead of the water that is called for, I will use the homemade broth from the last chicken.

    Never waste the big turkey carcass either. I have a recipe for a fabulous after Thanksgiving soup but will have to primalize it as it includes fresh corn.

    I have even been toying with the idea of saving the water I use when I am steaming veggies.

  9. #9
    Annika's Avatar
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    I should add that I reduce my broth quite a bit in order to save freezer space, so it ends up fairly concentrated. For this reason, I do NOT add salt until I am using the broth to cook with. If you taste the unsalted broth as you are making it, it will taste pretty blah. It's amazing what a little salt does for flavor!

    And thanks Primalmaven, I stand corrected: a turkey carcass makes even better broth than a chicken carcass!
    My blog: Pretty Good Paleo
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  10. #10
    BoyPrimal's Avatar
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    The resounding answer seems to be "Make chicken stock!"
    I'll set out to do that tonight.

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