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Thread: Isn't it irreversible now? page 3

  1. #21
    rphlslv's Avatar
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    Thank you for the extensive reply, Mick. I admit I was a bit too negative. So what it all leads to is that animal fat is indeed better for us than canola oil, eh? Wow. I can't help but wonder if the food industry knows this and feeds us with lies, or if they too made a mistake. I'm going to stay primal for as long as I can.

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  2. #22
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    rphlslv,


    I think "staying primal for as long as you can" is the right way to think/go about it. I have a lot of the same concerns as you: how can this planet possibly support 7 billion people all eating primally? (Answer: It can&#39;t.) The logic pathway that flows from that conclusion is pretty scary... but! There&#39;s no reason you, or I, or any of us should sacrifice our own health just because the right way to eat isn&#39;t something that every human being alive can enjoy, given the limits of our planet. Is that elitist? Perhaps. But I don&#39;t care. Eating primally certainly isn&#39;t *hurting* the earth or anyone else (quite the opposite...).

    Check out my blog here.

  3. #23
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    Nope, it can&#39;t. But what can be done is to teach people to include more animal fat and to process their grains correctly once more. This will alleviate some of the problem.

    Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
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  4. #24
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    processing grains correctly is an interesting comment. I was just studying Nixtamalization yesterday out of curiosity. Traditional cultures who ate corn used that process to make it possible to eat corn. When the Europeans brought corn back to Europe with them, they didn&#39;t learn the process, or feel they needed to learn the process because they had the capability to grind the grain without nixtamalization. The result was a lot of people got pellagra due to a lack of niacin.


    You know what they say -- those who don&#39;t study history are doomed to repeat it. People like Mark are asking us to question why are we ignoring our history in our life styles? Good will come of it. The other thing they say is that when there is a will, there is a way. We are reaching the tipping point I feel.


    Keep up the good work!

    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

  5. #25
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    Why should we bother? I can&#39;t answer that question for everyone, but I can for me: Because if I don&#39;t, I am a coward; I have given up without trying. If I don&#39;t, I am condemning myself to spend the rest of my life fat, sick, and doomed to die young.


    Agriculture does indeed seem to be at the root of our problems, but it need not be destroyed to improve the health of the populace. Instead, it should be changed. The industry should become focused toward providing healthy food rather than mass grains.


    But how can we change it? Some ask this question with a genuine desire to know, but most will fling it about as a way to absolve responsibility, assuming that the presence of the question implies no answer. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although it may not seem like it, in a capitalistic society it truly is the consumer who has the power. We may feel like the victims of the industry fat-cats, mooching off whatever they throw at us, but the truth is that they rely on us for their very survival. If the consumers refuse to participate in their game of self-destruction and inhumanity, it cannot continue. They will be forced to change or die.


    That is why I bother. That is why I will spend time educating others about the problems with our food supply - talking about the food I eat, linking to videos, whathaveyou. Because the industries aren&#39;t going to do a thing about it. It&#39;s up to the "powerless" consumers.


  6. #26
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    Well said GeriMorgan.


    Here&#39;s a link to the article where Jared Diamond calls Agriculture the worst mistake in the history of human race.


    http://tinyurl.com/yvkkfu


  7. #27
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    When I see my family following CW and eating unhealthful foods, I almost feel guilty and selfish for eating healthy. Although I&#39;m eating healthy, my family not eating healthy is a cause for stress for me.


  8. #28
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    It seems like my entire country (Brazil) is completely ignorant of this whole anti-grain thing. I tried searching about it in Portuguese and so far I haven&#39;t found a single thing on it besides the common wisdom that grains (especially whole grain! ;]) are healthy... and that fats are the most fattening nutrient. Sigh.

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  9. #29
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    That must be the new wisdom imported from the West. What was nutrition like in your grandmother&#39;s generation? What did people traditionally eat? I&#39;m from India and people ate traditional foods up until the 80s. It&#39;s only when the country&#39;s economy opened up, that we have had an influx of junk food.


  10. #30
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Well Brazil IS the West. Southwest. I can&#39;t tell you how our nutrition was prior to 1991 (when I was born), but from my experience back there it was white bread, white rice and beans EVERYDAY. Not necessarily junk food but not healthy either. I had never seen whole grain.


    My family in particular did own a farm and most of our meat and dairy came from there. Very far from a Primal diet but surely better than the current American one. Nonetheless our top cause of death is heart disease, and diabetes makes into the top ten.


    Oh, talking about junk food, it pisses me off how McDonald&#39;s found a place in every corner of the world. And everybody&#39;s lovin&#39; it!

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