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  1. #11
    ReachWest's Avatar
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    When I was first introduced to MDA and the Primal way of eating, my first reaction was that it seemed "extreme" and "odd". After doing more reading on this site and others, though, it started to make good sense.


    When friends/family ask how I've lost so much weight in 5 months (+/-25 pounds) and if I've been working-out, I usually answer that its 80% diet and that I have cut out all grains, all dairy and all processed foods. Most of the time their eyes seem to "glaze over" at that point and the discussion ends.


    In my experience, most people I talk to are not interested in learning any more - they seem to think it's some wierd diet fad.


    If the discussion ventures into the consumption of saturated "good" fats, then they imply that I'm crazy and will probably become a victim of early heart failure. Obviously the conventional dogma is very well instilled in peoples minds.


    For the few individuals that are interested in further discussion, I usually point them to Mark's Daily Apple, so they can do their own research.


  2. #12
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    Most people want 'the easy answer' when it comes to losing weight. It doesn't matter what, as long as it doesn't involve commitment and personal responsibility.


    Unless specifically asked, I don't really care to bring it up. Most people tend to go with standard anti-low carb statements, which my favorite is 'different things work for different people.' Which, to some extent is true, but not *that* much different. Basic biomechanics are still the same.


    While this is going to be an overstatement on my part, I still think that it's generally true. Doctors generally aren't scientists - they're more or less high end auto mechanics. Something breaks, they troubleshoot the problem and try to fix it. Medicine is science-based, but most aren't doing full-fledged research or things like that. Assuming a given doctor keeps up to date on research, I think most are going to hedge their bets. Which, I'm sure a decent part of being a doctor is dealing with people's hypochondria, so this is probably the safest for them to be. You wouldn't probably want your doctor to suggest some surgery that he read about in some magazine that nobody's heard of before. While that's more severe than a diet change - diet changes can be dangerous for some people, too.


  3. #13
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    darienx19 is offline Senior Member
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    The conversation ALWAYS starts the same way:


    THEM: Wow! you've lost some weight, how did you do it?

    ME: I switched to eating a hunter/gatherer type of diet... meats, veggies, fruits, nuts, unprocessed dairy. I cut out grains, soy, and processed foods.


    Most people do give me "the look"... but in my experience it's because they are taking a mental moment to apply what I said to their lives to see just how "extreme" it is. Then come the questions:

    "So... no bread?"

    "Uhm... no bagels?"

    "No PASTA!?!?!"

    "What about rice?"

    then finally it adds up: "Why no grains?"

    I explain about the insulin rollercoaster and lectins


    THEM: How could grains be bad for you, the government [insert futile argument here]"

    ME: And you believe everything the government tells you?

    Pause for a moment of thought.

    THEM: So how do you do it? I can't imagine no sandwiches or macaroni and cheese...

    ME: It was hard for the first few days, and I still working on getting rid of them completely. I just do my best as often as I can. It is easier as time passes, and eating is much more enjoyable without having to worry too much about how much or how often I do it.

    THEM: But I love [Insert awful-for-you thing here]

    ME: I love not having those 40 pounds anymore


    My coworkers still think I'm crazy, but not because of the fact that I am doing it or that they think I'm "fad dieting." They think I'm crazy for enjoying unprocessed "health foods." I've found that the word 'primal' usually scares people... so I stick to 'hunter/gatherer'... it feels safer to the sheep.


  4. #14
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    it's odd trying to explain to someone that after the first 2-3 weeks, your cravings for many of the carb-rich foods kind of goes away. At least it did for me.


  5. #15
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    The reactions I get from people are very different.

    My parents for example simply do not wanna believe that grains are bad for you. I could show them tons of studies etc., they just don't believe it. But they've grown accustomed to my new lifestyle and even though it costs a bit more I think my mother is actually quite happy, that I'm eating so much vegetables and stuff from our own garden and that I'm cooking sth every evening - even though she kinda says that you have to eat something unhealthy every now and then....


    My friends on the other hand joke about my new lifestyle quite often and I honestly can't blame them. Male people at my age usually don't even TRY to eat healthy and so it really doesn't surprise me that they are a bit irritated by something so "extreme" like the primal lifestyle.

    But they also got used to it and it's really not that bad, makes me feel kinda special ;-)

    Also one of my friends recently said that I may be "overdoing" the whole fitness stuff a bit, because he was baffled how well my body already has developed. When I told my friends that it was mostly due to my new eating habits, most of them wouldn't believe me, but I really feel like they are understanding it more and more as time goes by.


    I got my hair cut yesterday btw and my coiffeuse was a bit worried, because she said I seem to lost quite some weight. This is worrying me a little, because I already was quite thin when I started, but on the other hand, my muscles don't seem to have suffered at all.


  6. #16
    Relosa's Avatar
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    I sent the link for Mark's Daily Apple to my mom and all she said was, "Well, be careful about fad diets." That's was pretty much my conversation with her.


  7. #17
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    darienx19, I experience the same thing. Every single conversation goes that way.


    When you talk about eliminating grains and sugar, it's like talking to an addict. You either get the concession that yeah, he really should give it up, BUT..., or the patronizing smile while underneath he sees no reason to give up something that makes him feel so good, regardless of the health consequences, or utter incomprehension, as though his addiction were necessary for him to go on living. I've seen that level of addiction to sugar.


    Maybe I will start up a sugar detox center. I just have to wait for Mark to appear on Oprah, wait for the message to ferment, then set up shop in Hollywood!

    You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

  8. #18
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    Oprah seems a great way to promote the PB. A partnership with Fox News and an endorsement from Peter Popoff might also prove invaluable to reach lots of elusive skeptics.

    “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
    "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

  9. #19
    Shine's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification


    Sadly, Fox News seems to be the only means of validation for a large chunk of the population. Or maybe that's just in central Texas; here the Gospel of Glenn Beck is considered second only to the Bible.


    It is very depressing to see the uncomprehending horror arise on a person's face at the prospect of abstaining from processed food. I die a little inside to see oddly-hued substances in ornately colored packages be recognized as "food" over a pile of raw meat and veggies.


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