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  1. #1
    Mick's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel


    So here's an interesting comment in a (very interesting) article on the digestive system by the redoubtable Sally Fallon and Mary Enig:
    [quote]

    It is always difficult to draw conclusions from epidemiological data, but there is one study that should serve as a warning to the fiber brigade. Researchers fed four groups of rats on diets high in alfalfa, wheat bran, cellulose and pectin for six weeks and then examined the jejunum and the mid-colon using electron microscopy. All groups suffered from mucosal surface changes that could interfere with nutritional absorption. Bran provoked the least severe changes, followed by cellulose followed by pectin, followed by alfalfa. Those consuming pectin and alfalfa suffered from severe degeneration of the intestinal villi ...


    As for fresh fruit, perhaps we should take a cue from Asian cultures who typically cook high-pectin fruits like apples, pears, peaches and plums. Stewed fruit is an old-fashioned dish--who makes stewed fruit anymore? Here is another traditional foodway that should be resurrected.
    </blockquote>


    http://www.westonaprice.org/moderndiseases/digestion_primer.html


    It&#39;s interesting that while modern people cook animal foods (often quite a lot) but eat plant foods raw or lightly cooked, it seems to have often been the other way round for our forebears.


    Here&#39;s a note on baked apples from an old recipe book. They&#39;re called "roast apples" here, but if they&#39;re done in an oven, I suppose they&#39;re actually baked.
    [quote]

    Roast Apple


    Some sorts of apple roast better than others; the best should burst into a juicy fluff in about 10–20 minutes, accordingt o size.


    When the cores are left in, the pips give a pleasant aroma to the fruit, so well-flavoured apples should be roasted whole. Later in the year the core may be withdrawn with a scoop, and the space filled with sugar and spice, honey and ginger, or mincemeat, or candied peel and syrup, or any stuffing that will cook with the apple.


    The shank bone of a sheep, cut slanting and filed smooth, makes the best apple scoop. It doesn&#39;t rust, bend, or discolour the fruit.
    </blockquote>


    Honey and ginger sounds good.


    They used to drop roasted crab apples in drinks like ale in the old days:
    [quote]

    When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl ...
    </blockquote>


    http://www.poetryfoundation.org/arch...html?id=174378


  2. #2
    suzyschnitz's Avatar
    suzyschnitz is offline Junior Member
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    Oh, I think I will make some this weekend, maybe with some pecans and butter. I have two bags of apples sitting at home without a purpose. Thanks!


  3. #3
    hannahc's Avatar
    hannahc is offline Senior Member
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    Wow that sounds amazing...no wonder so many people have digestive issues with apples though, my husband does and won&#39;t really eat them raw. We did have whole baked apples once last year, and have been craving them again ever since!!


    The idea of lightly cooking meat and thoroughly cooking fruits and vegetables is incredibly opposite anything we hear from CW now, that&#39;s such an interesting point. We keep hearing that fruits and vegetables lose their nutrient content when cooked or overcooked, so are told to just lightly steam them or eat them raw. But without breaking down the cellulose or adding fat the nutrients aren&#39;t even available to our bodies! I am grateful that the latter point is getting into CW, that we need fat to absorb lycopene for instance (think marinara sauce). Thanks Mick!

    You are what you eat,
    and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan


  4. #4
    Catalina's Avatar
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    Mmmm. . .apples baked with cinnamon, butter, raisins and walnuts. . .mmmm.


    And we&#39;re just getting to apple season. . .thanks, Mick!


    One of the interesting things about all of this information that folks are bringing in is that it all helps explain why folks two or three generations ago were much healthier, even though they ate what was a CW diet at the time.


  5. #5
    CathyG's Avatar
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    Don&#39;t forget that ham goes great with apples too. When I started reading about the shank bone of a sheep, I thought they were going to insert it into the core space and bake it together. That would be a great idea with ham or other type of pork. Add a little cinnamon and some aged cheddar (if you do cheese) - this is one of my favorite dishes (but I chop the apple).


  6. #6
    annadragon's Avatar
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    I find that peaches roasted with pork chops and a little Italian dressing to be pretty divine.


  7. #7
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    http://www.applebaker.com/


    I have one of these. It&#39;s awesome. Core the apple, fill the center with butter and cinnamon. Bake, enjoy


  8. #8
    Jeffrey K's Avatar
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    Hmm, pork chop with apple slices - now I know what&#39;s for dinner. Thanks everyone!


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