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Thread: How much tuna is too much tuna? page

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    JohnoNZ's Avatar
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    How much tuna is too much tuna?

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    Ive heard so many different theories on this and about how eating too much tuna can cause mercury poisoning.

    So how much tuna is too much tuna? I sometimes eat a 185g can everyday. Is this too much?

    Would love to hear others take on this and how much tuna you guys and girls typically eat.

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    invino77's Avatar
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    Not sure exactly because you would have to test each can. Make sure its yellowfin, not white albacore. I get 2 brands, one has yellowfins that are 20-40 kilos, and the other only 3-5 kilos ( really small) so go for smaller, younger fish. I eat about 3, 80 gram cans per week.

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    cillakat's Avatar
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    No amount of tuna can cause mercury poisoning. The seychelles child development study clearly showed that with rare exception (whale, shark, tilefish, king mackerel) mercury in fish is not a problem - likely due to the selenium content. Most fish are high in selenium which binds with the mercury harmlessly escorting it from the body.

    the problem with tuna, tends to not be mercury (regardless of what CW says on the issue) but bycatch and overfishing. It's best to use pole or troll caught rather than the ubiquitous purse-seine and long lines.



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    m e g a n foxy's Avatar
    m e g a n foxy is offline Senior Member
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    I'm interested in this as well. I've been eating a whole pouch of white albacore tuna for about 4 days in a row now, and it tastes so good to me right now I don't want to have to stop eating it lol. And it so quick and easy with some homemade safflower mayo. I'd be very sad to learn I may get sick from eating too much. I hope part of this is CW myth :/
    && It's not just about living well, it's about dying well.

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    DarthFriendly's Avatar
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    If it obstructs an airway, or ruptures your stomach then it's too much.

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    Check this out:

    http://www.lahainanews.com/page/cont...ry.html?nav=21

    The evidence is overwhelming that eating ocean fish, including tuna, is part of a healthy diet and lifestyle despite the low levels of mercury present.


    While it is agreed that mercury at high concentrations is toxic, the toxicity of trace levels of mercury found in open ocean fish like tuna remains controversial.


    Yellowfin tuna was first shown in 1972 to protect against mercury toxicity, not cause it. The rich levels of selenium in tuna were responsible for the protective effect. Tuna has a relatively high content of selenium and tends to accumulate additional selenium when mercury is present.


    Selenium, an essential trace element in our diet, is vital to the body’s antioxidant system and proper immune system function. It has anti-cancer effects and is known to detoxify metals, including mercury. It has been shown to protect against mercury in every animal model tested.


    Selenium has an extremely high binding attraction and strength with mercury, forming a biologically inactive compound, mercury selenide. For this reason, it is important to have an excess of selenium over mercury in the diet, or run the risk of selenium deficiency and the toxic effects of mercury.

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    JohnoNZ's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies guys.

    Had never given too much thought to the type of tuna, but ive just looked at a can from a brand I usually eat and it says its Yellowfin.

    This has prompted me to also think about what the tuna is sitting in. Ive got a can of tuna in olive oil here and and on the ingredients it says "olive oil (17%)" but it also says "soya based vegetable broth".

    Another can, savoury onion flavour, from the same brand (I tend to shy away from the flavored tuna but eat it very occasionally) state on its ingredients "soybean oil". It also does'nt specify what type of tuna it is.

    Another brand ive had before in oil, states that it is "sunflower oil". Im not exactly sure on the merits of sunflower oil but I think ive heard before that it wasnt great.

    My question is, is the amount of soy or ther oils in the tuna going to cause an issue?

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    periquin's Avatar
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    As long as there is sufficient room for you to move your arms and legs and swim, there aren't too many tuna.

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    periquin's Avatar
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    I just gave up trying to find information about a forensic study that I read about in some magazine a while back. Done in Japan on a centuries old tuna carcass in one of their labs. They found that the mercury levels some pair of so of centuries ago were comparable to those of today. We humans can't take all the blame for contaminating oceans and fish.

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    Stabby's Avatar
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    You definitely don't want any soy or sunflower oil. Even a tbs provides a ton of omega 6, most of it rancid.

    Here is the article arguing that mercury in fish is no issue because of selenium http://thehealthyskeptic.org/is-eati...ot-eating-fish
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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