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Thread: Sterilization of Cutting Boards page

  1. #1
    Rivvin's Avatar
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    Sterilization of Cutting Boards

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    I have a cutting board I use for both meat and veggies as its huge and covers a large portion of my couter-top.

    I was wondering what the best way is to sterilize this thing after cutting meat on it so it remains safe for all the other foods I prepare on it afterwards?

    It's too big to take into the sink, so I am not sure what will get this clean without leaving harmful chemicals on it.

    I am not a hippy who hates soap and deordorant, so please don't hesitate to recommend commercial products.

    Help a guy out here, please!

    edit:
    I have read that a spray bottle with a 25% bleach and 75% water solution is a safe way to clean cutting boards. What do you think about this?
    Last edited by Rivvin; 08-08-2010 at 04:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Spyhop's Avatar
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    I would use white vinegar instead of bleach. You CAN safely use very dilute bleach solutions on food prep surfaces, but if you prefer non-toxic stuff (as I do), I'd recommend vinegar instead, as it's non-toxic and safe to consume even at full strength.

    Take a look at this "how-to" on cleaning and disinfecting butcher-block cutting surfaces- if yours is plastic and not wood, you can skip the sealing with oil. Pretty much just scrub with soapy water, rinse with hot water, spray liberally with a vinegar and water mixture and wipe dry.

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    Peggy's Avatar
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    Rivvin: I have a spray bottle of bleach water for just such uses. I use a weaker solution; 25% might be a bit strong. I have worked in the food service industry for over 20 yrs & we use a weaker solution. Every so often I put all of my boards in the sink and soak them in bleach water & give them a good scrubbing. If I'm prepping a meal & go between produce & meats, I usually try to cut all my produce 1st, then the meat. If I cut meat before veg, a quick wash with soap & water does the trick. Or I change boards. Since you have one very large board, think of getting another smaller one (or two). You can place the smaller one on top of the larger, for those smaller jobs like scallions or lemons.
    Just don't leave boards stacked while damp - they will mold. You have the white plastic boards, right?

    edit: and since the board is large, you could do the periodic soaking in the tub?

  4. #4
    Rivvin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peggy View Post
    Rivvin: I have a spray bottle of bleach water for just such uses. I use a weaker solution; 25% might be a bit strong. I have worked in the food service industry for over 20 yrs & we use a weaker solution. Every so often I put all of my boards in the sink and soak them in bleach water & give them a good scrubbing. If I'm prepping a meal & go between produce & meats, I usually try to cut all my produce 1st, then the meat. If I cut meat before veg, a quick wash with soap & water does the trick. Or I change boards. Since you have one very large board, think of getting another smaller one (or two). You can place the smaller one on top of the larger, for those smaller jobs like scallions or lemons.
    Just don't leave boards stacked while damp - they will mold. You have the white plastic boards, right?

    edit: and since the board is large, you could do the periodic soaking in the tub?
    Yeah this one is a huge white plastic one.

    I went to target and bought a black plastic board that is the same size (I have huge counter-tops) and laid it down next to the white one. The white board will be purely for raw meats and setting stuff on, the black one will be for vegetables and cooked foods (sausages, etc).

    I will make a vinegar/water solution to keep in a spray bottle underneath the counter and use that to clean my boards after use.

    I worked in kitchen for a number of years, but we had a commerical solution we cleaned our boards in and had kitchen bitches to do it for us so I've never really worried about it before. I've always had smaller cutting boards I could wash in the sink so I never really had to think about this before until now!

    Kind of sad, isn't it? Thanks for the advice!

  5. #5
    jrherring's Avatar
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    I've switched to using a 1:4 solution of cheap white vinegar for almost all my cleaning. Including my cutting board. And at the end of the night, the last thing I do is spray a good coating of it on my cutting board (after it was cleaned) and letting it sit overnight.

    good luck!
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    Susan Sumner published this a while ago. I've used it even to disinfect meat before making jerky (just in case of E. coli...); also used it for produce and boards, etc.

    http://www.sciencenews.org/sn_arch/9-28-96/food.htm

    http://emeraldcoastmom-cleanhouse.bl...oxide-and.html

    http://www.practicallyedible.com/edi...rsterilization

    Hope it helps.

    Rubén

  7. #7
    birdie's Avatar
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    CDC Center for Disease Control also accepts hydrogen peroxide as a sterilization product in the restaurant industry. So, that's what most green restaurants use.

  8. #8
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    I remember seeing an experiment where they used different methods to sterilize a sponge. It included bleach, vinegar and the microwave(seperately! lol)
    Microwave killed almost all the germs while the other two only killed about half. I know that you probably can't fit your cutting board in the microwave, so maybe a boiling hot water and soap soak might do the trick.

    ETA:Thinking back on it, it would probably help to know what type of boards you use. Plastic would be fine for soaking, wood not so much. If you have wood, you could just wash it off with hot water and soap. Also, bathtub for soaking.
    Last edited by Metismomma; 08-09-2010 at 10:09 AM.
    Calm the f**k down.

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