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Thread: My Primal Greek Spinach with Feta Pie page

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    greek_girl's Avatar
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    My Primal Greek Spinach with Feta Pie

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    I really miss my greek spinach and feta pie made with a crispy filo pastry. I decided to make it with eggs like the vegetable bake recipe in Marks cook book.

    Ingredients:

    800 grams of spinach,
    300 grams feta cheese, crumbled
    1/2 cup fresh dill, chopped
    1/2 cup parsley, chopped
    8 green onions, finely chopped
    loads of eggs
    S & P

    Cut the spinach into small pieces with your fingers and wilt it to remove most of its water. Mix in the rest of the ingredients. Season with salt and peeper and add as many eggs to almost cover the mixture. Bake at 350 for 40-50 minutes until eggs are set.

    This is such a healthy and delicious recipe! I am hoping to add more Greek recipes soon!

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    this is also really good with some minced lamb mixed in with alot of garlic!
    "The first wealth is health."
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    I miss spanakopita! Thanks for the recipe and I'll look for your other Greek recipes.

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    this looks really delicious and really simple! I'm going to have to try it sometime this week.... thanks so much for sharing!
    Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. (Thoreau)

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    greek_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizski View Post
    I miss spanakopita! Thanks for the recipe and I'll look for your other Greek recipes.
    Haha! How do you know it is spanakopita??????

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    Are green onions, spring onions/scallions or something else?

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    mizski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greek_girl View Post
    Haha! How do you know it is spanakopita??????
    I always called it spinach pie because I couldn't pronounce spanakopita. One day when I went to a little Greek pizza shop and asked for some spinach pie, the elderly mama who ran the place said, "Pie? Pie? This is NOT a bakery!" So I pointed to the pan of delectable pastry and spinach goodies. "That's not pie!, " she said. "If you ask for pie you will get pizza...pizza pie with spinach on it. You want spanakopita." I told her I didn't know how to pronounce it and she very patiently (sort of) gave me a lesson: "Spana means spinach; kopita means pie. Now say it....s p a n a...SAY IT!!!
    Now, k o p i t a...SAY IT!!!!!!! Now say them together: spanakopita"

    By this time a little crowd was gathering to watch my language lesson. I don't know why I didn't walk out. Maybe I was too embarrassed? Maybe out of deference to her age? Probably because I wanted that spinach pie. I never forgot how to pronounce spanakopita though and that was some years back. LOL

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    ikaika's Avatar
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    I hope you wouldn't have walked out! That is a valuable memory

    (and not for pronunciation, either!)

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    mizski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevew View Post
    Are green onions, spring onions/scallions or something else?
    Yes, green onions or spring onions are young shoots of bulb onions and are milder tasting than large bulb onions. They have a small, not fully developed white bulb end with long green stalks. Both parts are edible. Scallions are considered younger than a green onion because they should not have a bulb, while green onions should have a miniature bulb.

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    greek_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizski View Post
    I always called it spinach pie because I couldn't pronounce spanakopita. One day when I went to a little Greek pizza shop and asked for some spinach pie, the elderly mama who ran the place said, "Pie? Pie? This is NOT a bakery!" So I pointed to the pan of delectable pastry and spinach goodies. "That's not pie!, " she said. "If you ask for pie you will get pizza...pizza pie with spinach on it. You want spanakopita." I told her I didn't know how to pronounce it and she very patiently (sort of) gave me a lesson: "Spana means spinach; kopita means pie. Now say it....s p a n a...SAY IT!!!
    Now, k o p i t a...SAY IT!!!!!!! Now say them together: spanakopita"

    By this time a little crowd was gathering to watch my language lesson. I don't know why I didn't walk out. Maybe I was too embarrassed? Maybe out of deference to her age? Probably because I wanted that spinach pie. I never forgot how to pronounce spanakopita though and that was some years back. LOL
    Brilliant! That's a typical behaviour expected from an elderly from Greece... they take a lot of pride in their cooking so you have to pronounce it correctly even if you don't leave in Greece. I will be going for 2 weeks in September and I wonder how I will resist the gorgeous greek bread and the spanakopita of course!!!

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