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  1. #1
    nocturnalmama's Avatar
    nocturnalmama is offline Senior Member
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    I enjoyed this

    Primal Fuel
    Not sure if this has been posted or discussed here - but I enjoyed this lecture when I watched it a few months ago. I think it really speaks to many of the PB laws:

    http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/da...to_be_100.html
    Robin
    ~primal mama to 3~

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    Leanne's Avatar
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    Thank you for the link. Very interesting.
    I wonder what Mark would say about the cultures eating high amounts of beans and legumes?
    I what he says about surrounding yourself with healthy, physical people is true, it does encourage you to be more healthy and physical as well. I think the social networking ads to a sense of self worth that ads to the quality of ones life as well.

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    I would say that any of this is affirming the consequent and poor reasoning. If X lifestyle is optimal then Y population will do well on it. Y population does well on it, therefore X lifestyle is optimal. It is fallacious reasoning because there is no way to know if there is indeed a better way that doesn't appear in populations (most of the world is either poor or rich and eats junk food), and there is no way to know what is the cause of the success, it is shooting blindly in the dark. Also we can't isolate confounding factors and are only making blind generalizations.

    Negative stress and emotions are bad, enjoying daily activities is good, sleep is good, exercise is good but chronic cardio is bad. I agree and there is actual evidence to back this up instead of baseless assumptions. But with the food thing we are going to have to use our brains better. It may just be that if there is good infrastructure and health care, so long as people avoid sugar, processed junk, tons of omega 6 and get good nutrition then they can also expect to live 100+ years and so what these people are observing is not the virtues of beans and the evils of meat, but the difference between industrial diets and non industrial diets with many confounding factors. But keeping in mind that there is tons of evidence support paleo/primal to be optimal, and there are no examples of paleo/primal populations that also have a good quality of life and standard of living in the world, we can't use any epidemiological observations to decide what we ought to eat since there is no context to be found, except that hunter-gatherers tend to be very metabolically healthy, they just get killed by non degenerative factors. Anything to relish in pretense and avoid critical thought. Forget this guy, beans suck and a hefty chunk of ruminant fat coupled with fish fat does the body good.

    There may be some truth that too much protein can shorten lifespans but that is generally over the 20% mark, hence high fat, moderate protein, low/moderate carbs, no poisons, good nutrition and lifestyle. A certain amount of protein will be more of a boon than not.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

  4. #4
    Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nocturnalmama View Post
    Not sure if this has been posted or discussed here - but I enjoyed this lecture when I watched it a few months ago. I think it really speaks to many of the PB laws:

    http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/da...to_be_100.html
    I think some of what Buettner said he found to be healthful for people is unsurprising. That long-lived and healthy people should be active in their everyday lives, have a positive outlook, have social contacts, have a religious belief - and pray (which seems to have a calming effect on people) - none of that's surprising.

    However, I think the dietary advice is skewed. Nietzsche once spoke of people finding in texts what they'd previously buried. In other words, people see what they expect to see. I think this is probably the case with Buettner.

    Th reviewer at the WAPF gave his book a stinker of a review:

    http://www.westonaprice.org/book-rev...lue-zones.html

    It's a short and not particularly informative review, although this is a telling thrust:

    The Blue Zones is mostly story-telling and speculation. It is hardly scientifically rigorous. There is not a single footnote.
    Elsewhere on the same site, there is more relevant comment on the Okinawans in another context:

    An extensive study of diet and disease patterns in China found that the region in which the populace consumes large amounts of whole milk had half the rate of heart disease as several districts in which only small amounts of animal products are consumed. Several Mediterranean societies have low rates of heart disease even though fat—including highly saturated fat from lamb, sausage and goat cheese—comprises up to 70% of their caloric intake. The inhabitants of Crete, for example, are remarkable for their good health and longevity. A study of Puerto Ricans revealed that, although they consume large amounts of animal fat, they have a very low incidence of colon and breast cancer. A study of the long-lived inhabitants of Soviet Georgia revealed that those who eat the most fatty meat live the longest. In Okinawa, where the average life span for women is 84 years—longer than in Japan—the inhabitants eat generous amounts of pork and seafood and do all their cooking in lard.
    http://www.westonaprice.org/know-you...y-on-fats.html

    So there you go. Why all the blather about tofu from Buettner? Okinawans may eat more tofu than Americans, but I understand they don't actually eat very much of it. And, in fact, one wonders if the average American actually eats more soy than the Okinawans do, since it's stuffed in so much processed food. Why talk of tofu specifically and not soy?

    And why get hung up on the tofu and fail to mention the pork, the seafood, and the lard?

    I doubt Buettner is hiding a vegetarian agenda and being deliberately deceptive. I just question whether he's looking closely and rigorously enough. It sounds to me like he's gone out to these places with an idea of what one should eat already in his head and tends to notice whatever seems to confirm that and not notice what doesn't.

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    Stabby's Avatar
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    +1 on the Nietzsche quote. Academics and their prejudices mislead the herd and in their credulity and complacency
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

  6. #6
    nocturnalmama's Avatar
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    While, I think the specific criticisms given are valid - the essence of this talk is what appeals to me. If I wanted to introduce somebody to the concept of living primal, or even improving their lifestyle from a SAD diet - I would consider this to be an easy to listen to introduction to the primal principals.

    Fact is - the research in the Blue Zones is showing people live longer. One of the reasons why they live longer is because they do not eat processed food (I think we'd all be a whole lot healthier by simply just removing processed foods from our diet - especially soy!). I agree that Beuttner went into this with an idea of what people should be eating and found that. While the results he found may not prove the primal diet to be superior they do prove that a SAD diet is inferior and when I was initially exposed to making changes in my diet - that was all I needed to push me to make those changes. This is why I think this lecture and research is important.

    The other factors are all no brainers IMO. But, I feel they align very nicely within the Primal approach almost like a validation for the Primal Blueprint laws. To me, its all common sense. I imagine its all "old news" to Primal veterans, but I think listening to this stuff from another perspective is always good to hear. I love passing this lecture along to friends who are curious about my lifestyle. I think its a wonderful gateway to a healthier lifestyle. Who doesn't want to live longer?

    Don't get me wrong - I think we need to be critical and question studies like these further. I think your points are valid. I also think the essence of the Blue Zones study is worth sharing - with both primal and non primal folk. There is something to be gained in exploring why the average westerner is prone to chronic disease.

    On a side note - maybe worth a chuckle - this lecture was passed along to me by a vegetarian friend who felt it is a validation for her diet/lifestyle.
    Robin
    ~primal mama to 3~

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