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    Grumpycakes's Avatar
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    Fit for human consumption?

    Primal Fuel
    I was dog-sitting for my neighbours for a few days last week and the food they feed her got me intrigued. It's raw patties of ground up elk, cow, or bison, internal organs and bones and all. Sounds pretty good. It wasn't long before I started wondering how safe it would be for me to eat. Their website has this to say:

    We use the whole animal because the finely ground bones in whole animal raw food provide the proper balance of calcium and phosphorous. Whole animal food includes meat, bones, vital organs, heart, liver, lungs, kidneys and tripe - all the ingredients for full nutrition.

    Our high quality raw ground whole animal pet food is all Canadian and all natural - made from naturally-raised animals that come from local Saskatchewan farms where they are grazed, fed and cared for without any additives. From field to bowl, it's a natural process.
    It's the bones that concern me. I assume they're pretty close to powdered by the time they make it to the patties. There weren't any chunks that I could see. Could the human digestive system handle powdered bone? Could I be eating dog food in the near future?

    edit: I do plan on cooking the stuff as I'd cook regular ground beef.

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    Google 'prions'!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Primalchild View Post
    I was dog-sitting for my neighbours for a few days last week and the food they feed her got me intrigued. It's raw patties of ground up elk, cow, or bison, internal organs and bones and all. Sounds pretty good. It wasn't long before I started wondering how safe it would be for me to eat. Their website has this to say:



    It's the bones that concern me. I assume they're pretty close to powdered by the time they make it to the patties. There weren't any chunks that I could see. Could the human digestive system handle powdered bone? Could I be eating dog food in the near future?

    edit: I do plan on cooking the stuff as I'd cook regular ground beef.
    I am going to say that yes, everything would be fine mainly because I like the thought that some dude is out there eating dog food. I hate myself sometimes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivvin View Post
    I am going to say that yes, everything would be fine mainly because I like the thought that some dude is out there eating dog food. I hate myself sometimes.
    Actual 'LOL'!

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    If the slaughtering process is as clean as it is for animals intended for human consumption, I fail to see the difference. If organ meats are good for you, I'd rather be eating them all ground up than have to look at a pair of kidneys.

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    I say go for it. Only pansies get vCJD anyway; a good set of deep squats will cure it.

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    I'd try it; honestly, after reading the ingredients of several animal foods, I am starting to believe that some dog foods may actually be cleaner and safer to eat than human food.

    I doubt that HFCS, sucralose, xanthan gum, and all those other yummy goodies that appeal to humans appeal equally to dogs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chronyx View Post
    I say go for it. Only pansies get vCJD anyway; a good set of deep squats will cure it.
    Just spell it out for me, smartypants. What makes this meat more dangerous than supermarket meat?

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    Well I actually want you to read the same info I did so you can make your own mind up and i'm not passing on second-hand information.

    A proteinaceous infectious particle, or prion, is an infectious agent composed primarily of protein. Prions are the cause of a number of diseases in a variety of mammals, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, also known as "mad cow disease") in cattle and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. All known prion diseases affect the structure of the brain or other neural tissue and all are currently untreatable and universally fatal.

    Current research suggests that the primary method of infection in animals is through ingestion. It is thought that prions may be deposited in the environment through the remains of dead animals and via urine, saliva, and other body fluids. They may then linger in the soil by binding to clay and other minerals.

    Infectious particles possessing nucleic acid are dependent upon it to direct their continued replication. Prions, however, are infectious by their effect on normal versions of the protein. Sterilizing prions therefore involves the denaturation of the protein to a state where the molecule is no longer able to induce the abnormal folding of normal proteins. Prions are generally quite resistant to proteases, heat, radiation, and formalin treatments, although their infectivity can be reduced by such treatments. Effective prion decontamination relies upon protein hydrolysis or reduction or destruction of protein tertiary structure. Examples include bleach, caustic soda, and strong acidic detergents such as LpH. 134C (274F) for 18 minutes in a pressurized steam autoclave may not be enough to deactivate the agent of disease.Ozone sterilization is currently being studied as a potential method for prion denature and deactivation. Renaturation of a completely denatured prion to infectious status has not yet been achieved, however partially denatured prions can be renatured to an infective status under certain artificial conditions.
    Last edited by chronyx; 07-27-2010 at 02:07 PM.

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    PrimalCon New York
    I appreciate the info and I came up with the same thing when I googled prions, but I'm still not getting the point. You've bolded information about prion decontamination, but I still don't see why the animals in this pet food are at any higher risk for prions than the ones we get nicely ground up in cellophane and styrofoam packages. After all, mad cow disease was found in feedlot operations, wasn't it? And I haven't seen you advise against eating those animals.

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